Delhis minorities body rejects BJP MP claim that mosque and graveyard encroached

first_imgNew Delhi: The Delhi Minorities Commission has rejected BJP MP Parvesh Verma’s claims that mosques and graveyards have come up on government land here, with a fact-finding committee concluding that the list was prepared in a careless manner to spoil the social atmosphere in the city.The DMC fact-finding committee report also concluded that there is prima facie grounds for registering an FIR against Verma for “targeting” a particular community and “spoiling” communal harmony through his allegations. Also Read – After eight years, businessman arrested for kidnap & murderThe committee, led by social activist Owais Sultan, said it found no substance in Verma’s claim that 54 mosques and graveyards were allegedly constructed on government land, especially in his West Delhi parliamentary constituency. “The list of mosques, graveyards and Madrasas was prepared in a very careless and non-serious manner to spoil the social atmosphere,” Sultan said. “No mosques, graveyards or Madrasas was found constructed on government land,” he said. Also Read – Two brothers held for snatchingsVerma had recently claimed that mosques and graveyards were mushrooming on government land and met Lt Governor Anil Baijal and handed over a list of 54 such alleged illegal structures in the city. He had demanded immediate action in this regard. Taking cognisance of Verma’s charge, the DMC had up the fact-finding committee. The committee’s report was submitted to DMC chairman Zafarul Islam Khan recently and was released at the DMC office here on Thursday. Khan said the charge by Verma is “incorrect” as shown in the report which also probed records of mosques and graveyards cited by Verma.last_img read more

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Karnataka CBI takes over probe into alleged phone tapping case of politicians

first_imgNew Delhi: The Central Bureau of Investigation has officially taken over the case of illegal phone tapping of senior Karnataka politicians – of both ruling and opposition parties – during the Congress-JD(S) government’s HD Kumaraswamy’s time as Chief Minister of the state.The CBI on Friday registered a case in the matter after receiving the consent of the state government, under the relevant sections of the Information Technology Act and the Indian Telegraph Act. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’The case first came to light after a leaked phone conversation between the Bengaluru Police Commissioner, Bhaskar Rao and a person known as Faraz purportedly revealed Rao lobbying for the Commissioner’s post. The CBI FIR reveals that Faraz’s phone was being tapped in connection with a separate probe into a Rs 250 crore Ponzi Scheme when the conversation between Rao and him was recorded and extracted allegedly on the directions of then Bengaluru Commissioner, Alok Kumar. Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&KKumar was replaced by Rao on August 2, days after the BS Yeddiyurappa government came into power this year. The Pandora’s Box that was opened after the leak led to several senior politicians from both the ruling party and opposition BJP, making statements that their phones were also tapped by the Kumaraswamy government, in an attempt to quash dissent. Earlier this month, Yeddiyurappa had said that his government would transfer the probe into the alleged instance of phone tapping to the CBI for an impartial investigation. An interim report by the team probing the case in the state had found the involvement of ADGP-ranked officers in leaking the illegally taped phone conversation, following which demands for an impartial probe by the central agency came forward. According to CBI officials, the case has been registered against unknown public servants and private persons. The CBI’s FIR also raises the possibility of personal information of several senior government servants being leaked in the process. Senior Congress Legislative Party leader Siddaramiah had welcomed the decision of a CBI probe. However, JD(S) national general secretary Ramesh Babu had recently questioned the CBI’s capability to probe a phone-tapping case, alleging that the agency itself has been accused of illegally tapping phones.last_img read more

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As coach I wouldnt have wanted Neymar back

first_imgMadrid: Former Spain manager Vicente del Bosque has said he would not have brought Neymar back to La Liga had he been coach of Barcelona or Real Madrid, even though he recognises the Brazilian’s outstanding qualities as a player. Barcelona held several meetings with Paris St Germain to bring the Brazilian back to the Camp Nou two years after he walked out on them to join the French side for a world record fee of 222 million euros (about $245 million). Also Read – Puducherry on top after 8-wkt win over ChandigarhBut the two clubs failed to strike a deal before the transfer window closed on September 2, with PSG’s sporting director Leonardo claiming that the Spanish champions had failed to meet his side’s asking price. Leonardo also acknowledged that his club had spoken to Real Madrid about the forward. Neymar has scored 51 goals for PSG but both of his seasons in France have been marred by serious injuries at key stages in the campaign. He also had an on-field dispute with team mate Edinson Cavani over penalty taking duties. Also Read – Vijender’s next fight on Nov 22, opponent to be announced later”I think it would have been good for the Spanish league if he had come back but if I was a coach of a club I wouldn’t have brought him back,” Del Bosque told Spanish television network Estudio Estadio. “Whilst I’ll say he is a brilliant player, I don’t think very highly of him for other reasons.” Del Bosque, who won the 2010 World Cup and Euro 2012 as Spain coach plus two Champions League titles as coach of Real, also criticised Neymar for the manner in which he left Barcelona in 2017. “With Barcelona he did not behave well, in fact he behaved badly, very badly,” he added. “If you surveyed Barcelona fans I’m sure that more than half of them wouldn’t want him back. There’s a reason for that.”last_img read more

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Im gonna abstain

first_imgLos Angeles: Brad Pitt has made it clear that he is not going to participate in the Oscar campaigns of his films – Once Upon a Time in Hollywood and Ad Astra. The 55-year-old actor has received overwhelming reviews for his performance in Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time in Hollywood and he is expected to be nominated in best supporting actor category at the 92nd Academy Awards. In James Gray’s space epic, Ad Astra, the critics have hailed Pitt’s grounded turn as an astronaut searching for his father in the outer reaches of the solar system, making him a potential candidate for best actor Oscar at the next year’s award ceremony. Pitt, however, has no plans of running an Oscar campaign for either of the films, saying that he has never chased award glory. “Oh, man. I’m gonna abstain. I mean, you never know, and it’s really nice when your number comes up.”last_img read more

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The silence after the blast How the Halifax Explosion was nearly forgotten

first_imgHALIFAX – A boy presses his small face up to a cold window pane. It’s an early winter morning, and two ships in Halifax harbour are exchanging a cacophony of horn blasts.Vessels use these loud whistles as they pass, the boy’s mom explains.But today, Dec. 6, 1917, they do not pass.The Norwegian relief vessel, the SS Imo, collides with a French munitions ship laden with explosives, the SS Mont Blanc. For 19-1/2 minutes, a dazzling display of fireworks captivates onlookers as the Mont Blanc drifts and burns.The toddler, playing with a toy train on the kitchen window sill, watches the flames engulf the ship — the last images he will ever see.At 9:04 a.m., the Mont Blanc blows up with devastating force, its 2,600 tons of explosives levelling swaths of Halifax and Dartmouth, raining down shards of white-hot iron, blowing off roofs and shattering glass — including the windows of a small wooden house in the city’s north-end Richmond neighbourhood.There, at age two years and seven months, Eric Davidson is blinded in the Halifax Explosion.“My father was still looking out and all the glass came in on his face and his upper body,” his daughter, Marilyn Elliott, said in an interview.“Doctors looked at him and determined that his eyes couldn’t be saved. Both of his eyes were removed that day. In an instant, a little baby, a happy-go-lucky baby, is without sight.”As a little girl, Elliott grew up knowing her father was blinded in the horrific blast that claimed nearly 2,000 lives, injured 9,000 and left 25,000 homeless. But it wasn’t a topic that was openly discussed in her family.The wartime disaster was mentioned in passing, in hushed tones, with a heavy heart.“My grandmother was a changed woman after the explosion. She grieved the loss of her baby boy’s eyesight,” Elliott said. “It was a permanent trauma that she carried with her the rest of her life.”A hundred years after the greatest human-made blast before the atomic bomb, the country is commemorating the explosion’s centennial with a large memorial service at Fort Needham Memorial Park. Dozens of organizations have received grants for museum and art exhibitions, theatre productions, documentary films and concerts. Canada Post has issued a striking commemorative stamp, a new plaque has been erected, a time capsule created and books published.But the Halifax Explosion anniversary wasn’t always so publicly remembered.For many years, Dec. 6 passed quietly in this East Coast town, with a small service or private prayers, but no official public ceremony marking one of Canada’s worst humanitarian disasters.In the wake of a deafening blow and billowing white smoke that rose thousands of metres above the harbour, a silence settled over the city: It would take decades before the blackout was lifted, and the heartwrenching stories of the Halifax Explosion told.***Jim Cuvelier, a 101-year-old survivor of the Halifax Explosion, said the disaster wasn’t spoken of when he was growing up.“People tried to forget it. You don’t carry that stuff around,” said Cuvelier, a baby who was at home on Lady Hammond Road on the outskirts of the blast zone at the time of the disaster. “I never heard them talk about it.”Mothers couldn’t bear the deaths of innocent babies. Children disappeared without a trace. Others turned up days later in makeshift morgues. Girls and boys struggled to comprehend being suddenly orphaned. Wives mourned their husbands, killed instantly in harbourfront factories. Soldiers grappled with the insurmountable trauma of watching homes burn to the ground, families still inside, the scent of burning flesh in the air.“The city was devastated. It was such a cataclysmic event, so traumatic, that I think people probably didn’t want to revisit those horrors,” said Craig Walkington, chairman of the Halifax Explosion 100th Anniversary Advisory Committee. “It really did do incredible damage. There was virtually no family that wasn’t touched by it, whether injuries, fatalities, or a loss in some way.”The horrors witnessed by survivors on that day 100 years ago were, for many decades, unspeakable. The blast wiped out much of Halifax’s densely populated north end and parts of Dartmouth, including a Mi’kmaq settlement known as Turtle Grove, and badly damaged the African-Nova Scotian community of Africville.The shock wave of the explosion was felt as far away as Cape Breton, and windows nearly 100 kilometres away cracked. It was followed by a towering 15-metre tsunami, drowning survivors near the shore and sweeping many bodies out to sea. Upturned cook stoves ignited fires that consumed wooden homes, scorched entire blocks and made the rescue of some injured survivors trapped inside homes impossible.That night, a blizzard blanketed the city with more than 40 centimetres of snow. “It got cold and the snow buried bodies. The next three days were a horror story,” local author and historian Dan Soucoup said. “They found children two or three days later huddled and frozen in the snow.”Relief efforts were badly hampered by the cold and snow. Still, miraculous stories emerged from the rubble.A soldier walking through the flattened Richmond neighbourhood a day after the explosion heard a faint whimper coming from a burned-out house. He walked through the charred debris and there, protected under an ashpan, he found a baby girl. The 23-month-old orphan, nicknamed ‘Ashpan’ Annie, was burned but alive.In some cases, entire families were killed. In others, one survivor lived on. One woman, Mary Jean Hinch, lost 10 children and her husband in the explosion. Pregnant and alone, she was rescued after being pinned under lumber for 24 hours. She and her unborn son were the only survivors in her family.Other harrowing tales from the front lines speak of near mythical courage. A train dispatcher, Vince Coleman, spent his final minutes warning an incoming train of the impending blast, prompting it to halt in its tracks and saving passengers and crew. In another case, most of the crew aboard the Stella Maris died attempting to attach a line to the Mont Blanc to tow it away from bustling Pier 6.***The disaster, towards the end of the First World War, made headlines around the world.“I have newspapers from all over the world. The Halifax Explosion shared the headlines with the major war-time events. It was not just some local thing,” said Janet Kitz, author of several books on the Halifax Explosion.As stories of the disaster got out, generosity flooded in. Children in Brantford, Ont., gave up their Christmas presents to raise money for the children of Halifax, donating $15,000 for relief efforts. People in Truro, N.S., lined the tracks at the rail station waiting to help the waves of refugees that arrived from Halifax in need of food and shelter.The city’s hospitals were inundated with wounded survivors and several emergency medical stations were set up in schools and clubs. Although aid arrived from across Canada and the United States — particularly Boston, a city Nova Scotia still thanks every year with a Christmas tree — many of the first medical responders on the scene hailed from nearby communities. Doctors, nurses and firefighters from across the Maritimes showed up to take on the harrowing task of aiding the injured.George H. Cox, a doctor and eye specialist from New Glasgow, about 150 kilometres northeast of Halifax, arrived at the Rockingham train station outside Halifax the next day. With the tracks into the city destroyed, he trudged through deep snow to Camp Hill Hospital. Men, women and children lined the corridors, many with glass, pottery, brick, mortar and nails stuck in their eyes. He quickly realized that the large number of ocular injuries required his expertise.“He worked for 40 hours removing eyes. He had a bucketful of eyes,” Soucoup said. “He chased everybody out, slept for three hours, and did that again.”Halifax’s mortuaries were also overwhelmed. Bodies, charred and frozen, were stacked like firewood outside funeral homes. Many unidentified corpses were stored in a school basement. Funerals went on for weeks, and services for the unidentified bodies drew thousands of mourners.***As the body count climbed, bereaved locals, politicians and newspaper editors began questioning the cause of the blast and demanding to know who was responsible for the calamity. Details of the collision emerged during a judicial inquiry and legal proceedings, though few got the answers they were seeking.When the Mont Blanc, laden with thousands of tons of explosives, came upon the Imo on the wrong side of the harbour, it asserted its right-of-way using loud whistles — the very horn blasts that attracted little Eric Davidson.“The Mont Blanc did have the right to the channel. But the Imo was stuck on a course it couldn’t get out of,” said Joel Zemel, an author and historian. “By the time they realized it, it was too late to avoid an accident. Everything that could go wrong did go wrong.”The initial investigation pinned the blame on three men: The Mont Blanc’s captain, its pilot and the Royal Canadian Navy’s chief examining officer in charge of the harbour. Given the Mont Blanc’s explosive cargo, it was said that the burden rested with its crew to avoid a collision at all costs.In the end, however, the Supreme Court of Canada and the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council in London found both the Mont Blanc and Imo were equally to blame for the navigational errors that led to the crash. No one was ever convicted in the disaster.Yet questions persisted, like why the crew of the Mont Blanc didn’t scuttle the ship, or steer it out to sea. “They were criticized heavily for being cowards,” Zemel said. “But it would have taken six hours to sink the boat. And they thought they only had 10 seconds, not 19-and-a-half minutes.”The ship’s cargo included wet and dry picric acid, TNT, gun cotton, benzol and other ammunition. “They were just a floating bomb. They could have tried to warn people but they didn’t want to die. It was run for your life,” he said.***Despite the enormity of the catastrophe, Halifax was forced to slowly pick up the pieces and move on. Swaths of the city had been levelled, and rebuilding was necessary to assuage the misery and anguish of survivors. Tents on the Commons had given way to rows of wood and tarpaper tenements near the current site of the Halifax Forum, but more permanent homes were desperately needed.Prime Minister Sir Robert Borden promised the full resources of the federal government would be placed at the city’s disposal, said Barry Cahill, author, researcher and member of the Halifax Explosion advisory committee.Nearly $30 million was set aside for the Halifax Relief Commission to assist with medical care, rebuild infrastructure and establish pensions for injured survivors. One of the commission’s lasting legacies is Canada’s first public-housing project, the Hydrostone development not far from the blast site itself. “They had the good sense to retain a famous English town planner, Thomas Adams,” Cahill said. The English-style garden suburb was completed in 1920.As homes, churches, schools and factories were rebuilt, Halifax residents pushed the terror of the explosion from their minds, in part out of necessity. With hard times ahead, people struggled to get on with their lives.“It wasn’t an easy time in the 20s and 30s. There was a lot of depression here. Economically it was a difficult time in the Maritimes,” Soucoup said. “The city went to sleep until the Second World War.”Halifax survivors were also fatigued by the news of endless First World War casualties in Europe.“People were a wee bit hardened because of war,” Kitz said. “The Nova Scotia Highland Regiment was at Passchendaele and several hundred men had been killed and wounded. Each day brought newspaper lists of those killed in action and hospital ships carrying wounded men arrived regularly.”***It took generations for the disaster to be commemorated. After the one-year anniversary, the city didn’t hold another official public memorial until the 50th anniversary in 1967. Church services were observed and small ceremonies organized, but Halifax’s collective psyche was not yet ready to publicly recall the calamitous blast that claimed so many lives.“It could have been too painful in the early days,” Elliott said, noting that even after the service in 1967 it once again fell by the wayside. “Why was it forgotten? No one has the answer to that. It could have been a sign of the times. Back then, people didn’t like to dwell on misfortune. It wasn’t really talked about.”Kitz wonders if the commemoration of the Halifax Explosion would have been different had it happened in another part of the city.“It happened in the north end of the city, where it was mainly working-class people. If City Hall had been destroyed or the big businesses of the south end had been decimated, it would have been slightly different maybe. It’s hard to say. Somehow you were expected to just get on with it. And that’s what people did.”It was Kitz’s tenacious research that helped change that.In 1980, she penned an original undergraduate essay on the Halifax Explosion that led her to uncover boxes of mortuary artifacts gathering dust in the dark basement of Province House. She carefully catalogued objects that belonged to the dead, such as a child’s Richmond School notebook with the words “Thou Eternity Away Forever” scrawled at the bottom of a page. “I quickly found it wasn’t the objects in themselves that were intrinsically interesting. It was the people behind the objects,” Kitz said.She interviewed survivors who had been children in 1917, many of whom had never spoken of the enormous explosion out of respect for the impenetrable grief of their parents.“Their mothers would never speak of it, because many of the fathers and children had been killed,” Kitz said. “For a mother who lost perhaps a husband and two children … it must have been just appallingly difficult. I don’t think the mothers could ever have spoken openly of what they went through.”But older children who had survived the explosion opened up to Kitz about what transpired on that winter day so long ago. “They were eager to share their stories. Many of the younger survivors had very vivid, personal stories,” Kitz said. “It wasn’t so absolutely desperate for the children. There was almost a pride about being a survivor.”Kitz helped fundraise for a monument to victims of the disaster. In 1985, the Halifax Explosion Memorial Bell Tower was opened at Fort Needham Memorial Park overlooking the explosion site. Survivors and those wishing to pay their respects now had a place to assemble.Kitz also helped mount an exhibit on the disaster at the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic in 1987, and two years later her best-selling book Shattered City further revived interest in the explosion.Elliott, whose father passed away in 2009, offered another theory as to why the city nearly forgot about a seminal event that shaped its history: Survivors simply weren’t ready to confront their memories.“Those impacted the most by the explosion needed time.”last_img read more

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Doug Ford raises abortion issue in effort to woo social conservatives expert

first_imgTORONTO – One of the four candidates competing to lead Ontario’s Opposition raised questions about access to abortion this week, resurrecting a political hot potato while stopping short of promising to reopen debate on the issue.Doug Ford’s statements that he would not personally revive the abortion debate but would allow those in his caucus to bring forward legislation on any matter important to them appears to be a “Hail Mary” move aimed at wooing the party’s socially conservative members as the leadership race comes to a close this weekend, a political analyst said.“This is a top-down leader and for him, on this issue, to be signalling that, hey, it’s ok by him for any of his caucus members to be where they want to be on the map on this one tells me that this is a retail politics vote-getting move, pure and simple,” said Myer Siemiatycki, a professor of politics at Toronto’s Ryerson University.“If he really believed it, he would say this is what he’s going to deliver, and the fact that he’s not prepared to say that says to me it’s about appealing to a base and portion of the (Progressive) Conservative party that nobody else has, on this issue, spoken to.”In interviews with various media outlets this week, Ford suggested that as party leader he would welcome having members of his caucus table legislation that would require parental permission for abortions sought by minors.He clarified his position Tuesday, saying that while he personally believes in “the sanctity of life,” he would follow in the footsteps of the federal Conservatives by not rekindling debate on the issue.“That being said, I will allow MPPs to draft, bring forward, and debate any legislation that is important to them,” Ford said in a statement.“The Liberals have set a dangerous and narrow-minded precedent both federally and provincially. I will never put members of my party in a position where they will have to compromise or deny their personal beliefs. I will never muzzle members of our caucus.”While the right for patients to give or refuse consent is laid out in law, there are currently no provisions regarding parental notification, according to Ontario’s medical regulator.Physicians must determine whether a patient has the capacity to give informed consent regardless of age, according to the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario. If the patient cannot consent, then the physician must seek out a substitute decision-maker.“A minor patient is either capable of providing informed consent to treatment or they are not,” said spokeswoman Kathryn Clarke. “The usual obligation that physicians have to maintain patient confidentiality exists for minor patients who are capable of providing informed consent to treatment.”The issue seemed to divide Ford’s rivals for the leadership, with only one — parental rights activist Tanya Granic Allen — saying she believes parents should be directly involved and consulted about any medical treatment proposed for their child.“She has never discussed legislation, she just believes strongly that parents are responsible for the best interest of their children and patient-doctor confidentiality should not permit a doctor to treat a child outside the knowledge of their parent,” said spokesman Mike Patton.Former Tory legislator Christine Elliott said she wouldn’t prevent party members from voting in line with their beliefs, even if they clash with hers.“I do not support any restrictions on abortion access, but would support a free vote by party members on any issues involving matters of conscience,” she said.Caroline Mulroney’s camp said the Toronto lawyer and businesswoman has been clear she has no interest in revisiting the controversial issue.“While she respects the broad range of opinions on this issue, she would not restrict a woman’s access, or criminalize her right to choose. She won’t reopen this debate,” said spokeswoman Melissa Lantsman.Premier Kathleen Wynne, meanwhile, said she wouldn’t wade into the Tory leadership debate but said her government’s position on the abortion issue has been longstanding.“We support a woman’s right to choose and that been our position for a long time,” she said. “That will not change.”last_img read more

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A lot to offer Plans for at least one Arctic university in

first_imgThe world’s only northern nation without some form of Arctic university may soon have three of them.There are plans in all three of Canada’s territories to give their residents a better shot at higher education. Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut all have different approaches but similar goals.All want to give their youth a chance to learn without having to travel thousands of kilometres. All want to focus on the needs of their particular jurisdictions.And all believe the North has characteristics — from language diversity to climate change — that could make an Arctic university a draw for students and researchers from around the globe.“We have a lot to offer,” said Caroline Cochrane, the N.W.T’s minister of education.The idea of a northern university has been kicked around since at least 2007 when a pan-territorial survey found residents wanted more influence over Arctic research. Northern First Nations have been asking for one for 50 years.Arctic colleges offer northern students degree programs such as education and nursing. But the programs are run and degrees awarded by southern institutions.Now, northerners are taking control of their own post-secondary education. Yukon is likely to be first out of the academic gate.“We’ve got three degrees lined up,” said Karen Barnes, president of Yukon College, soon to be Yukon University.This September, the institution will offer its first three bachelor’s programs under its own name instead of those brokered through another university.One will be in Indigenous governance, taking advantage of expertise in Yukon’s 11 self-governing First Nations. The second will be a business degree focused on operating in remote communities.The third will be in northern studies — traditional knowledge, culture, history and current situation of northerners.“A lot of universities have offered degrees in northern studies but this will be the first one actually offered in the North,” said Barnes.Also this fall, the N.W.T. legislature will consider an extensive report on the territory’s Aurora College that recommends a Northern Canada Polytechnic University that would combine bachelor’s and applied studies with a community college to support secondary schools. A search is on for someone to lead that transition, said Cochrane.“I think a university is needed within the N.W.T.,” she said.The Eastern Arctic is also moving ahead.By October, Nunavut Arctic College hopes to announce a partnership with a southern institution. It wants to broaden the college’s current offerings with a view toward the administrative needs of government and the technical requirements of the resource industry.Eleven southern universities have applied to be that partner, said Jesse Jacobs, the college’s director of planning.“What we’re really looking for in a partner institution is to take Inuit traditional knowledge and ensure that we are able to put it into credentials that are recognized nationally,” he said.Cultural relevance is prominent in the plans of all three institutions. Often, southern course materials just don’t work in the North.When Cochrane took her social-work degree in the south, she was taught that privacy concerns meant she shouldn’t get personal with her clients or acknowledge them in the street.“You go into a community of 100 people and you don’t shake hands in the store, you don’t have a job pretty soon,” she said.Language will be a big part. Jacobs said his college’s partnered programs will be taught in Inuktut, the term used for all dialects spoken by the Inuit.Just offering post-secondary courses in the North is a big deal. Travel to study elsewhere is a major cost and cultural disincentive for potential students, Cochrane said.“A lot are intimidated by southern universities. It’s hard when you come from a (tiny) community to all of a sudden walk into a community of millions.”Universities, however, are expensive. Financing the territories’ post-secondary plans remains unsettled, although Cochrane said one source of income could come from research partnerships in areas such as climate change.The Yukon government has topped up its annual $27 million grant to it Yukon College by $1.5 million to help with the transition to a university. The college is also about to begin a campaign to raise about $65 million over the next 10 years, Barnes said.Things are starting to happen, said Jacobs.“It’s an exciting time to be in post-secondary education in the Arctic.”last_img read more

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MPs could debate whether to revoke Suu Kyis honorary citizenship Trudeau

first_imgUNITED NATIONS, N.Y. – Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is opening the door to debate on whether to strip Myanmar’s de-facto leader of her honorary Canadian citizenship.The Trudeau government has faced pressure to revoke the honour given to Aung San Suu Kyi in 2007.Speaking to reporters at the United Nations General Assembly, Trudeau says Parliament could debate whether to take away the citizenship that MPs bestowed upon her.But Trudeau says the humanitarian crisis in Myanmar will not resolve itself whether Suu Kyi has Canadian citizenship or not.Suu Kyi has been widely criticized for not speaking out against the atrocities being committed against Myanmar’s Rohingya people.Last week, the House of Commons unanimously adopted a motion to recognize the crimes against the Rohingya as genocide.last_img read more

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Thats no bull Manitoba steer Dozer bigger than massive Aussie steer farmer

first_imgSTEINBACH, Man. — A Manitoba farm sanctuary is inviting people to meet a gentle giant after a photo of an Australian steer towering over other cows went viral.Knickers the Holstein has been making headlines Down Under because he stands just under two metres in height and weighs about 1.4 tonnes.But Dozer the steer near Steinbach stands about 2.5 centimetres taller.And that is no bull.Karl Schoenrock from Kismet Creek Farm took in Dozer last spring from an owner in Alberta who wanted a better of quality of life for the massive steer.Schoenrock says the farm takes animals in to live out their natural lives.“Everybody is pretty much smaller than Dozer. Even our horses and everything else, nothing compares,” he said Wednesday.“He is just so calm, with his demeanour.”Dozer currently shares a pasture with two other steers and a horse. (CTV Winnipeg) The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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Design firm tied to federal detention centre says extreme leftists targeting it

first_imgMONTREAL — A Montreal-based architecture firm involved in the construction of an immigrant detention centre says it has been attacked again by “extreme leftists.”The firm Lemay said in a statement one of its employees was personally targeted in front of his home. The company adds its property has been hit several times over recent months by the leftist group, which it doesn’t name.Lemay did not say who was attacked or how, but an anonymous post to an anarchist website described an arson attack against the car of one of the firm’s architects and partners. The post on Montreal Counter-Information celebrates the torching of a BMW belonging to a Lemay partner outside his home in the city’s west end on June 11.Montreal police spokesman Julien Levesque confirmed today the force’s arson squad is investigating a June 11 arson incident involving a car in the Notre-Dame-de-Grace borough. He wouldn’t give other details.According to the federal government’s procurement website, Lemay is part of a joint venture that received a contract in 2018 worth up to $5 million for a new immigration holding centre in Laval, Que., north of Montreal. Since then, the company has been the target of a series of attacks.Last May, police opened an investigation after crickets were released into Lemay’s offices. A group calling itself the Anti-construction Crew claimed responsibility on the Montreal Counter-Information website.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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Trudeau should apologize for violation of ethics code Philpott

first_imgOTTAWA — Former Liberal cabinet minister turned Independent MP Jane Philpott says the people of Canada still “deserve an apology” from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on the SNC-Lavalin affair.In an interview with The Canadian Press, Philpott says since the ethics commissioner found Trudeau violated the Conflict of Interest Act, “that is one of the things” he should apologize for.Trudeau said Wednesday he takes full responsibility for the SNC-Lavalin affair, but he refused to apologize for what he called standing up for Canadian jobs, which he said is what Canadians expect him to do.Philpott, however, says that’s not why Canadians want to hear him say he’s sorry.She is seeking re-election in the federal riding of Markham—Stouffville as an Independent while former justice minister Jody Wilson-Raybould, the central player in the controversy, is doing the same in the B.C. riding of Vancouver Granville.Philpott says she took a stand based on principle because she believes her constituents watned her to uphold the highest ethical standard and she welcomes the “validation” in the ethics commissioner’s report. The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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Air Canada ordered to pay 21K to francophones over language violations

first_imgThe Canadian Press MONTREAL — The Federal Court has ordered Air Canada to pay a total of $21,000 to two francophones for repeated violations of their language rights, including seatbelts on which the instruction to “lift” the buckle was marked only in English.Michel Thibodeau and Lynda Thibodeau filed 22 complaints in 2016 with the commissioner of official languages for alleged offences under the Official Languages Act.The pair complained that planes’ emergency exit door signs were either in English only, or the English words were in larger font than the French ones. They noted seatbelts were engraved with the word “lift” with no French-language equivalent.And they complained that a French-language boarding announcement made at the airport in Fredericton was not as detailed as the English-language one. The two say Air Canada systematically violated the linguistic rights of francophones.The airline argued the Thibodeaus were interpreting the Official Languages Act too strictly. The airline said the law doesn’t require it to treat the two languages identically, but in a substantially similar way.On the issue of the seatbelt, it was the manufacturer’s decision to mark the word “lift,” Air Canada said, noting that a fully bilingual message on how to use a seatbelt is delivered before takeoff.Federal Court Justice Martine St-Louis disagreed. She ordered the airline to write letters of apology to both complainants and to pay them damages totalling $21,000.The Thibodeaus have complained about Air Canada’s language act violations before.Their last legal case against the airline went to the Supreme Court of Canada. The two lost, however, after the country’s highest court ruled Air Canada didn’t have to respect the language laws on international flights.last_img read more

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Beyoncé Supports World Humanitarian Day

first_imgWorld Humanitarian Day is a day of remembrance set up for victims of the 2003 bombing of the Baghdad, Iraq United Nations Headquarters. The holiday serves as moment to promote global humanitarian efforts and to recognize those who have lost their lives in the pursuit of such efforts. Music superstarBeyoncé promoted the August 19, 2012 observance by releasing a video for her hit single “I was Here.” The song, taken from her album 4, focuses on creating a legacy dedicated to making positive impacts in the lives of others.The video was filmed on August 10, 2012 at the New York United Nations General Assembly Rooms and features a star packed audience including actress Julia Stiles, singer-songwriter The-dream and “I was Here” writer Diane Warren.Beyoncé is no stranger to humanitarian causes. The singer has also been involved with projects benefiting the Survivor Foundation, Feeding America, the Clinton Bush Haiti Fund and the Lunchbox Foundation.Copyright ©2012Look to the Starslast_img read more

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Josh Duhamel Launches Valspar Hearts And Hands For Habitat

first_imgActor Josh Duhamel today joined Valspar Paint and Habitat For Humanity to launch Valspar Hearts and Hands for Habitat.The program auctions off the colorful handprints of celebrities and notable personalities created with Valspar Paint. The auction benefits Habitat for Humanity’s Disaster Response program, which provides immediate and long-term response and solutions to devastating natural disasters, such as Hurricane Sandy and the recent tornadoes in Oklahoma and Texas, that damaged and destroyed thousands of homes.“I am proud to partner with Valspar Paint and Habitat for Humanity for this important program which benefits a cause that is very near and dear to my heart. The rebuilding process is ongoing; I’ve seen it firsthand in my hometown of Minot, N.D., with the destructive floods in 2011,” said actor Josh Duhamel. “Through this program, everyone can support Habitat families as they repair and rebuild their communities, and gain access to safe and secure places to live. Please, bid now.”Valspar Paint, known for offering the Valspar Love Your Color Guarantee, has received autographed handprints from a range of celebrities showing their guaranteed love and support of Habitat for Humanity. In addition to Josh Duhamel, other celebrities’ handprints that have been donated include: Patrick J. Adams, Kate Bosworth, Mischa Barton, Brooke Burke, Rosanne Cash, Eric Close, Marcia Cross, Fergie, Jenna Elfman, Ethan Hawke, Genevieve Gorder, Heather Graham, Jonathan Groff, Warren Haynes, Ashley Hebert, Stacy Keibler, Minka Kelly, Jenny McCarthy, Jillian Michaels, Lea Michele, Bette Midler, Miles Redd, JP Rosenbaum, Kelly Rutherford, Susan Sarandon, Liev Schreiber, Taylor Spreitler, Naomi Watts, and more.Valspar is committed to helping everyone connect to the power in color, and to symbolize celebrities’ love and support of Habitat for Humanity’s mission, each set of colorful handprints feature a heart that was created using a range of vibrant Valspar Paint colors. In addition to proceeds from the auction benefitting Habitat’s Disaster Response program, for every set of celebrity handprints created for Valspar Hearts and Hands for Habitat, Valspar is donating $1,000 to the cause, with a minimum donation of $25,000.“Valspar has a long-standing relationship with Habitat for Humanity, and we are committed to supporting their mission of providing safe and affordable housing. At Valspar, we believe color can transform, and that is why we guarantee paint for every new Habitat home built in the United States, and why we also offer the Valspar Love Your Color Guarantee which ensures that our consumers find their right color,” said Paula Shikany, director of marketing for Valspar.After a disaster strikes, Habitat helps families rebuild their lives with both immediate and long-term assistance. Valspar began supporting Habitat locally in the mid-1980s. Since launching its national partnership in 2002, the Valspar Foundation has committed more than $60 million in cash and paint to Habitat through 2014.“We are grateful to Valspar for their continued support of Habitat’s mission and goals,” said Jonathan T.M. Reckford, CEO of Habitat for Humanity International. “The Valspar Hearts and Hands for Habitat auction provides support to our Disaster Response program and is another example of how the Valspar Foundation is committed to helping us create a world in which everyone has a decent place to live.”The Valspar Hearts and Hands for Habitat auction is now live on the Valspar Paint Facebook Page, with handprints open for bidding through Friday, Aug. 30, 2013 at noon EST.last_img read more

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OUT Helps Kick Off New York Pride 2014 Season

first_imgOUT, the world’s leading gay fashion and lifestyle brand, kicked off Pride Season in New York with an exclusive invite-only event hosted at Millesime at the Carlton Hotel in Manhattan.Perez Hilton poses for the 2014 OUT Magazine Hot List & NY Pride PartyCredit/Copyright: Mike Coppola/Getty Images for OUT MagazineIn celebration of OUT’s annual “Hot List” issue, which this year features The Normal Heart and White Collar star Matt Bomer on its cover, the cocktail reception featured a mix of VIP celebrities and guests and Las Vegas DJ Lisa Pittman spinning throughout the evening.The evening featured live performances by Barrett Wilbert Weed and Dave Thomas Brown from the Broadway musical Heathers and legendary drag performers Severely Mame and Macy Rodman, music by renowned Las Vegas DJ Lisa Pittman, as well as special guests including Perez Hilton; Alysia Reiner (Orange Is the New Black); Cappie Pondexter (WNBA’s New York Liberty); designer Alexis Bittar; photographer Braden Summers; Jaymes Vaughan from the world famous Chippendales male revue show in Las Vegas; and actress Sarah Megan Thomas (Law & Order Special Victims Unit).Sponsors of the OUT Hot List Pride Party are Marriott International, which featured their #LoveTravels campaign; Cottonelle; Gillette Body; Las Vegas; SKYY Vodka; and Midori Melon Liqueur.last_img read more

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Usher And Tyrese Gibson To Perform At Ford Neighborhood Awards

first_imgAward-winning entertainers Usher, Tyrese Gibson and Kenny “Babyface” Edmonds will heat up the stage in Atlanta, bringing their smooth vocals and superstar performances to the 13th Annual Ford Neighborhood Awards at the Philips Arena on Saturday August 8th.Steve Harvey and television/radio/film producer Rushion McDonald created the one-of-a-kind Neighborhood Awards (formerly the Hoodie Awards) and Neighborhood Awards Weekend to recognize and celebrate men and women from all over the United States who uplift their neighborhoods through their contributions and excellence as entrepreneurs, religious and community leaders, educators and more. Hosted by Steve Harvey – the EMMY-winning talk show, Family Feud and radio star marks his 13th year helming the one-of-a-kind Awards show – welcoming a winning lineup of celebrity presenters and fans coming together for a dazzling night of glamour, filled with laughs, unpredictable moments, exuberant speeches and inspiring entertainment.Anthony Anderson, Wendy Raquel Robinson, David and Tamela Mann, Michelle Williams, Erica Campbell, Yolanda Adams, Kym Whitley, Roland Martin, Shirley Strawberry, Nephew Tommy, and Carla Ferrell are among the host of celebrity presenters expected, joining Harvey for a witty, jubilant celebration to unveil this year’s Neighborhood Awards winners in 12 categories. This year’s Top 48 honorees encompass entrepreneurs, community/religious leaders and educators from across the nation, with categories including Best Church and Best Community Leader remaining open for voting online in one category per day until June 16th, on www.NeighborhoodAwards.com.The 2015 Ford Neighborhood Awards show is the cornerstone event in a four-day lineup of entertainment running August 6-9th in Atlanta, with other signature events during the weekend taking place at the Georgia World Congress Center, featuring appearances from Ne-Yo, Doug E. Fresh, Nephew Tommy, Sheryl Underwood, Erykah Badu, Jodeci, Salt-N-Pepa, Jazmine Sullivan, K. Michelle, Avery Sunshine, Yolanda Adams and more.Tickets for the Ford Neighborhood Awards show and weekend events are available via Ticketmaster. The 2015 Neighborhood Awards Weekend includes support from Ford Motor Company, State Farm, Masterbuilt, AARP, McDonald’s, Express Employment Professionals, Tracfone, and DHerbs. Stay tuned into the #1 rated Steve Harvey Morning Show weekdays on the radio or online from 6-10 AM EST at www.SteveHarvey.com for essential news, daily inspiration, laughs, interviews and more with Steve Harvey and his co-hosts.last_img read more

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Jay Leno Hosts 20th Anniversary Gala To Celebrate Hudson River Park

first_imgThe 20th Anniversary Gala to celebrate Hudson River Park was held at Pier Sixty in New York City last week.Jay Leno onstage at 20th Anniversary Gala to celebrate Hudson River ParkCredit/Copyright: Getty ImagesThe event, hosted by Jay Leno, honored Claire Danes, Alicia Glen and Scott Rechler.Additional guests in attendance included Martha Stewart, Gabby Hoffmann, Alex and Keytt Lundqvist, Lea DeLaria, Diana Taylor, and Ryan and Emilia Serhant. The evening featured music Natalie Merchant and DJ Lina.Hudson River Park, the longest riverfront park in the nation, is Manhattan’s backyard. Running from Chambers to 59th Street along the Hudson River, it has transformed four miles of decaying industrial waterfront into a beloved, urban recreational paradise. Hudson River Park attracts millions of visitors to its myriad recreational facilities, educational and cultural programs, imaginative playgrounds, lively dog parks and lush green lawns, waterfront esplanade and bike paths. To learn more about Hudson River Park, click here.last_img read more

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CBC ANNOUNCES FALL BROADCAST PREMIERE DATES FOR NEW AND RETURNING TELEVISION SERIES

first_imgAdvertisement Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: CBC today announced premiere dates for its fall 2016 television season, featuring a diverse and uniquely Canadian slate of six new and 18 returning series including premium drama and comedy, cutting-edge news and investigative content, original documentaries and engaging factual, arts, kids, daytime and sports programming.New primetime series include THIS IS HIGH SCHOOL (6×60), premiering Sun. Oct 2, which will offer unprecedented and unfiltered access to real life at a Canadian high school; comedy KIM’S CONVENIENCE (13×30), the funny, heartfelt story of a Korean-Canadian family running a convenience store in Toronto, premiering Tues. Oct. 4; and political thriller SHOOT THE MESSENGER (8×60), premiering Mon. Oct. 10, which centres on the complex relationships between crime reporters and the police.CBC’s daytime programming welcomes the highly anticipated one-hour weekday program THE GOODS on Mon. Oct 3, hosted by Steven Sabados, Jessi Cruickshank, Shahir Massoud and Andrea Bain, who will offer playful inspiration and information on home, style, food and wellness; while new Kids’ CBC original series include the Tues. Sept 6 world premiere of animated adventure DOT. (52×11), based on the children’s book by entrepreneur Randi Zuckerberg, and photography competition series SNAPSHOTS (6×30), premiering Sat. Sept. 10.Returning for new seasons are CANADA’S SMARTEST PERSON (season 3); DRAGONS’ DEN (season 11);EXHIBITIONISTS (season 2);HEARTLAND (season 10);HELLO GOODBYE (season 2);MR. D (season 6);MURDOCH MYSTERIES (season 10);RICK MERCER REPORT (season 14);THE ROMEO SECTION (season 2);THIS HOUR HAS 22 MINUTES (season 24); and THIS LIFE (season 2). Also returning are acclaimed news and investigative programs MARKETPLACE (season 44) and the fifth estate (season 42); thought-provoking documentary series FIRSTHAND (season 2); David Suzuki’s THE NATURE OF THINGS (season 56); and weekly CBC Sports series ROAD TO THE OLYMPIC GAMES.THE MOBLEES (season 2) and BIG BLOCK SINGSONG (season 3) return for new seasons on Kids’ CBC.The complete CBC fall premiere schedule is as follows: TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 67:45 a.m. (8:15 NT) — The Moblees 8 a.m. (8:30 NT) — Dot. *NEW SERIES*8:23 a.m. (8:53 NT) — Big Block SingsongSATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 109 a.m. (9:30 NT) — Snapshots *NEW SERIES*SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24:30 p.m. (5:00 NT) – Exhibitionists7 p.m. (7:30 NT) — Heartland8 p.m. (8:30 NT) — This is High School *NEW SERIES*9 p.m. (9:30 NT) — This LifeMONDAY, OCTOBER 32 p.m. (2:30 NT) — The Goods *NEW SERIES*TUESDAY, OCTOBER 48 p.m. (8:30 NT) — Rick Mercer Report8:30 p.m. (9 NT) — This Hour Has 22 Minutes9 p.m. (9:30 NT) — Kim’s Convenience *NEW SERIES*WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 58 p.m. (8:30 NT) — Dragons’ Den9 p.m. (9:30 NT) — The Romeo SectionTHURSDAY, OCTOBER 68 p.m. (8:30 NT) — The Nature of Things: “Pompeii’s People”9 p.m. (9:30 NT) — Firsthand: “Road to Mercy”MONDAY, OCTOBER 108 p.m. (8:30 NT) — Murdoch Mysteries9 p.m. (9:30 NT) — Shoot the Messenger *NEW SERIES*TUESDAY, OCTOBER 119:30 p.m. (10 NT) — Mr. DFRIDAY, OCTOBER 21 8 p.m. (8:30 NT) — Marketplace 8:30 p.m. (9 NT) — Hello Goodbye9 p.m. (9:30 NT) — the fifth estateSATURDAY, OCTOBER 22 4 p.m. ET (1 pm PT) — Road to the Olympic GamesSUNDAY, NOVEMBER 138 p.m. (8:30 NT) — Canada’s Smartest Person-30-About CBC/Radio-CanadaCBC/Radio-Canada is Canada’s national public broadcaster and one of its largest cultural institutions. We are Canada’s trusted source of news, information and Canadian entertainment. Deeply rooted in communities all across the country, CBC/Radio-Canada offers diverse content in English, French and eight Aboriginal languages. We also provide international news and information from a uniquely Canadian perspective. Advertisement New series SHOOT THE MESSENGER, KIM’S CONVENIENCE and THIS IS HIGH SCHOOL anchor CBC primetime lineup of distinctly Canadian storytelling Daytime sees the premiere of the highly anticipated new weekday program THE GOODS and the launch of new Kids’ CBC titles DOT. and SNAPSHOTS Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

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Montreal dancer to perform in silence after company wins rights to Leonard

first_imgMONTREAL—On March 6, when Montreal dancer Susan Paulson will take the stage to perform a piece choreographed to Leonard Cohen’s song “Famous Blue Raincoat,” she’ll have to do it without the music.That’s because last week a Montreal company, Ballets Jazz de Montreal, announced it had struck a five-year deal giving it exclusive rights to use Cohen’s repertoire in dance shows.The news shocked Margie Gillis, who choreographed and originally performed the piece Paulson was set to present in March as part of the “Legacy Project,” an homage to Gillis’ four-decade contribution to modern dance. Login/Register With: Advertisement Advertisement Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement “My first reaction was ‘this can’t be true, this doesn’t make sense,’” Gillis told The Canadian Press in a phone interview.After debating “for about a minute” about whether remove that segment from the show, Gillis asked Paulson to perform the piece in silence.The 63-year veteran dancer says the decision wasn’t a protest against the other dance company, but rather an homage to Cohen, who died in November at the age of 82.Gillis made slight changes to the choreography to make sure the piece’s themes of loss and forgiveness shine through in the dancer’s movements.She’s also changed the title from “Blue” to “The presence of absence” to show that both the song and the singer himself can still inspire even in their absence.“As (Cohen) said, ‘there’s a crack in everything, that’s how where the light gets in,’” Gillis said, quoting one of the singer’s lyrics. “And that’s what we’re doing here.”Gillis is not the only dancer to use Cohen’s music in recent years. Several others, including Canadians Catherine Gaudet and Guillaume Cote, have used his work in recent years, while Les Grands Ballets Canadiens have announced a performance honouring the singer in 2018.Les Grands Ballets did not immediately respond when asked if their programming would be affected by the moratorium on Cohen’s songs.Last Tuesday, Ballets Jazz de Montreal said its worldwide exclusive dance and circus art rights include Cohen’s name and image as well as his visual, musical, and literary works.The company plans to debut a Cohen-inspired show in December that “will be performed through a series of acts, evoking the cycles of life, the colours of the seasons and nature’s true elements,” according to a news release.Getting exclusive rights is an increasingly common way for dance companies to market their products in a competitive world, according to Fabienne Cabado, the executive director of a group that represents dancers in Quebec.“Competition is fiercer and fiercer, and artists have to find creative ways to stand out,” she said in a phone interview.But it can be hard on other artists who may be forced to revise or even cancel planned shows—something Cabado says few can afford.She also believes the practice raises wider philosophical questions on the commercialization of art and its role in society.“Can we in one swoop, appropriate the work of one artist?” she said. “It limits possibilities for creators, and for the public who won’t get access to works created in the echo of other artists.”Gillis says she understands the reality of exclusive rights, and will be in the audience for Ballet Jazz’s show come December.“It will be a bit bittersweet but (I’m) also thrilled that somebody is creating movement to this brilliant poetry,” she said. Twitterlast_img read more

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Circus meets extreme sports in Cirque du Soleils Volta

first_img Login/Register With: Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Twitter “I think when people sat down to think not about how to reinvent Cirque du Soleil but to push the boundaries and try to do something different, extreme sports just came to the surface,” said Johnny Kim, the show’s assistant artistic director.It also meshes with the larger story Volta is trying to tell, of a young man learning to embrace his differences in a fantastical take on the modern world, complete with social media, smartphone addiction, and the desires for instant fame and popularity.READ MORE Facebook Advertisement Advertisement MONTREAL― This fall, Cirque du Soleil’s latest show, Volta, will bring a mix of the timeless and the trendy to Toronto audiences.There are the fanciful costumes, makeup and characters that have become the Montreal-based company’s international calling card over three decades. And while many of the acts and performers are firmly rooted in traditional circus disciplines, what sets this show apart is its incorporation of extreme sports more likely to be found on YouTube channels and social-media streams than under a circus big top.Parkour free runners jump and flip and swing through an obstacle course of steel bars, bridges and surfaces that rise into the sky, while a team of freestyle BMX riders make up the finale of the show with a performance on see-through Plexiglas ramps that give the audience a sort of fish-tank view of the tricks.last_img read more

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