Cloud Goes Mainstream in Brazil Financial Market

first_imgBrazil, the B in BRIC, is regularly in the media. An emerging economy going through deep social transformations, Brazil is facing serious infrastructure challenges. With millions rising from the lower to middle classes, urban mobility and transport are under discussion. Roads, ports, airports, communication, and energy management are also challenged. In the middle of this revolution, the finance industry organized CIAB, the largest financial and technology sector event in Latin America.The finance industry in Brazil has always been a leader in technology adoption. Brazil’s unified compensation system was among the first in the world to interconnect multiple banks in real time, under modern and innovative regulation. With this spirit still in mind, the theme of the show was very appropriate: New Challenges of the Financial Sector.New consumers, modern banking models, mobile payment, social interaction, and advanced security threats are all trends driving the need to change and achieve more efficiency with technology so it was no surprise that the biggest message at the event was the financial industry’s dependence on IT. Now, more than ever, financial services organizations need technology to succeed.EMC was a Diamond Sponsor at this year’s event, with former CIO Sanjay Mirchandani on stage discussing IT Transformation and IT Efficiency. EMC’s positioning on Cloud, Big Data, and Trusted IT was perfectly aligned to the event.While there, I had the opportunity to meet with customers and partners at EMC’s booth, speak with journalists who wanted to better understand EMC’s cloud solutions for the finance sector, and present on the Cloud Computing industry panel.The panel was very interesting. With representatives from IBM, Capgemini, and Brasilcap (a national credit operations company), we discussed the vision, roadmap, evolution, and state of IT around Cloud Computing in the finance industry.There are three important aspects that I would like to call out.First, we are on the verge of a new digital platform called “the third platform” as coined by IDC. The scale of users and new applications puts pressure on existing infrastructure, and the old ways just won’t work anymore. In order to remain relevant, IT organizations will need to be prepared to be elastic and flexible like never before.Second, Cloud transforms IT, and the early adopters are already taking advantage. Organizations need to accelerate Cloud adoption and stop asking “when” and start asking “how.”Lastly, the Software Defined Data Center will be the new way to deploy infrastructure that is elastic and flexible, and can meet efficiency demands through built-in automation and virtualization. EMC’s Converged Infrastructure Vblock offering with VCE and new Software Defined Storage platform, ViPR, demonstrate how we’re helping transform infrastructure management for the Cloud Data Center.These three messages were reinforced during the Q&A session that took place after the presentations. It was a great interactive discussion that called for specific industry examples. Fortunately, I came prepared with the NYSE Euronext Capital Markets Community Platform story.This example shows how a finance organization not only took advantage of its own IT efficiency for enabling the business, but also leveraged these new strengths to seize opportunities that were born from a new world of interconnected financial services.CIAB started many conversations on the linkages between the finance sector and IT, and I hope EMC can continue to make strides in helping these companies lead their own IT transformations.last_img read more

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Accelerate and simplify with management tools designed for virtualization

first_imgThe good and the bad on server virtualizationFew technologies have had as profound an effect in the evolution of the data center as virtualization.  The increased flexibility and reduced cost that a virtualized environment offers are well documented.  Server provisioning times, for example, have been significantly reduced with the ability to roll out a new virtual server as compared to a full bare metal deployment. And as more data centers are moving to cloud, virtualization lays the foundation and gives businesses even more flexibility to get new servers up and running when needed.However, with all the benefits that come from virtualization and cloud, there’s also increasing complexity.  To deal with this complexity, IT teams are using a combination of non-integrated tools to manage their physical and virtual resources. Routine tasks like configuring and deploying a virtual server can involve using multiple tools that don’t talk to each other and often times require administrators to do things manually.  All this can result in an increased risk of errors and IT teams that are strapped trying to keep up with all of the different tools.The skills required to be proficient in all the tools that are needed to manage complex virtualized environments, along with the lack of integration amongst tools, puts increasing pressure on IT teams and makes it even more difficult to maintain clear visibility across physical and virtual resources.For example, in VMware environments, administrators have already spent considerable time in training and practice to become skilled users of VMware vCenter.  Why should they need to spend time learning how to use yet another new tool to get the critical information required to keep their virtualized servers up and running?There’s light at the end of the tunnelDell offers systems management solutions designed for use with all of the leading virtualization platforms with one goal in mind….making the IT administrator’s job easier. These tools are fully integrated, allowing IT administrators to manage their servers directly from the virtualization console that they are already familiar with.  This helps reduce the need for learning a new tool. Dell also provides administrators with detailed, actionable intelligence on the status of their Dell servers so they can focus on meeting SLAs and be proactive in avoiding downtime.At the heart of the Dell PowerEdge server brand beats the integrated Dell Remote Access Controller (iDRAC) with Lifecycle Controller. This 100% agent-free server management technology is the core of Dell’s enterprise infrastructure management solutions. This technology enables management at the server and remotely via a traditional console or mobile device as well as integrating with leading virtualization platforms like VMware vCenter.Leveraging the inherent benefits of iDRAC with Lifecycle Controller technology, Dell’s OpenManage Integration for VMware vCenter is a native VMware vCenter plug-in that enables administrators to monitor, manage, configure and deploy Dell PowerEdge servers — all from within their vCenter console. This gives administrators easy access to hardware-level monitoring and alerting.  Tasks like bare-metal discovery and deployment can be automated, allowing admins to do 80% of their physical server administration from within their virtualization management platform.Dell OpenManage Integration for VMware vCenter delivers streamlined platform management with seamless integration into the VMware vCenter Server console, providing a single pane of glass to manage both virtual and physical environments. Alert integration is also available with custom alarm definitions that enable administrators to remediate failures in an automated fashion.With OpenManage Integration for VMware vCenter, IT teams can dramatically reduce complexity, speed deployment and minimize risk in IT operations.  By providing cluster-level hardware views directly within vCenter, the OpenManage Integration for VMware vCenter plug-in enables easy scaling and a streamlined process for applying updates to multiple Dell hosts in a single, cluster-aware workflow. Administrators can use the six-step wizard tool to automate and schedule updates for all Dell PowerEdge servers in a cluster without losing any workload productivity.Watch the video below and visit http://www.Dell.com/OMIVV to see how you can bridge the physical and virtual gap and simplify IT operations in your datacenter with Dell OpenManage Integration for VMware vCenter.If you are attending VMworld, stop by the Enterprise Systems Management area in the Dell booth (booth #1431) to discuss your needs and see how we can help!last_img read more

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Your Sensitive Data Will Be Shared, So Make Sure It’s Secure

first_imgWhen you think of data breaches, you probably think of anonymous attackers tapping into your secure network via malware and accessing confidential data from afar. But a new Dell survey shows that an equally concerning threat may exist right within your walls.The Dell End-User Security Survey recently found that 72 percent of employees are willing to share confidential, regulated or sensitive data under certain circumstances. It’s not always because they’re careless, and it’s typically not because they’ve gone rogue. Rather, there are simply a number of scenarios in which it makes good business sense to share sensitive data.What’s troubling is not so much that employees are sharing data, it’s how they’re going about it. Today’s workforce is more mobile and collaborative than ever, and employees are engaging in risky behaviors simply to stay productive. More than half of employees (56 percent) use public cloud services such as Dropbox, Google Drive, iCloud and others for sharing or backing up their work. When sharing confidential files with third-party vendors or consultants, nearly half (45 percent) use email, while one-third (31 percent) say these outside parties have access to their company’s intranet or other internal information system. Target learned the riskiness of the latter approach firsthand when the company was breached thanks to a gap in its HVAC vendor’s security.Many companies understand the need to protect their information where it’s stored, but if you’re not also protecting it when it is being shared or used, you’re still opening yourself up to the risk of disastrous and expensive breaches.That’s why we created Dell Data Guardian. Data Guardian protects, controls and monitors data wherever they go. This is a solution that we developed in-house to solve a big problem in the market today. It provides file-level encryption and enterprise digital rights management to protect data when they’re in motion or in use without hindering workers’ ability to collaborate and be productive. Further, it also provides IT with the ability to control who gets access to the data, apply policies, and monitor the data activity and location even when they are outside of the corporate network.Want to see how this works in practice? This video will walk you through it:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xP85wH2jIEwWe launched Dell Data Guardian in December 2016, and we’re continuing to innovate and strengthen the solution. We look forward to sharing those developments with you as we release new updates. Today, we’re pleased to introduce two usability improvements that make secure sharing of information easier for file creators and recipients.Data Guardian now makes it easy to authorize new recipients when emailing files, keeping your data secure no matter where they go. Through an Outlook plug-in, Data Guardian enables senders to grant access to addressees in an email. Before access is granted, the file sender sees a pop-up to verify the action, protecting against unwarranted file access.With Data Guardian, users can painlessly extend the reach of their secure collaboration, while staying in control. External users who receive a file protected with Data Guardian but do not have authorization rights will receive an automatically-generated link to request access. This request will go back to the original file creator – not necessarily the person who may have forwarded the file – ensuring that only those who should receive access are quickly granted it. All this activity is logged in the Dell Data Security Management Server, giving the file owner continuous visibility as the file is shared onwards.We’re excited about what these updates mean for our customers and their need to protect critical data wherever they go. To learn more about Dell’s full portfolio of security solutions, including Dell Data Guardian, please visit our Data Security web site.last_img read more

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Resurrecting Your Career? Just Keep Talking

first_imgI’ve been there – moving from corporate life to the life of a stay at home parent. Spending my days reveling in every second of my kids’ lives, decorating my home floor to ceiling for holidays, over-volunteering my time. And then my life’s path took a very sharp turn. I found myself reentering the working world years before I had planned to do so.My experience as a photographer taught me the power of networking; my entire client base was based off of referrals. In fact, I can thank the power of networking for every job I have ever had throughout my career.So I brushed off the dust on my resume. Got to work on my LinkedIn profile. Set up job alerts on Indeed and FlexJobs.  Joined key Facebook groups. And then I started talking. I told anyone who would listen that I was on the job search. It didn’t matter if they were friends, family or the local coffee barista; they all were keenly aware of my search and keeping their ears and eyes open for me.So my advice, after being in your shoes and successfully finding my way back into the corporate world – talk, network, reach out.  It is so easy these days given all the means we have to communicate with each other.  In fact, I stumbled upon my current position, my dream job, by networking through an old friend.  And through the power of social media, I was able to find out that the hiring manager’s husband and I went to the same university.  Not only did knowing that make the first interview easier on both of us, but it made me a bit more memorable in her eyes.Now, after my 10 year hiatus, I have resurrected my career at Dell and my life’s path is much brighter.  I have a rewarding job and a flexible working environment that helps me balance work with my home life.The added bonus?  My network continues to grow.  I have met a number of women like me, who took time away from their careers for one selfless reason or another.  And, like me, they found a place at Dell and a perspective to share.  These inspirational women were more than willing to share their wise words with others who find themselves facing the uncertainty of reentering an ever-progressing workforce.Vice President in Dell Legal, Mary Hamaker, took 2 years off during her son’s early years.Be confident and don’t let anyone tell you that you’re somehow “damaged goods” because you’ve taken a break (that happened to me).  Maintain, and if possible, extend your network while on leave, even if only via social media.  Let people know when you’re planning to return, what you’re looking for and ask them to keep you in mind.  Have a few in-person meetings with people in your network who may be well-connected in an industry where you want to land. Stacey Moore (below), IT Product Owner: Customer Master Data Management, left her career to support her husband’s, which moved them from Texas to Copenhagen, Denmark for 3.5 years.I was anxious that I was not going to be able to find the right balance upon returning back to work full time. Don’t be worried though, you can and will find a good balance. Dell, from the very top level, supports work/life balance and a flexible work schedule. In my team, this is further supported at a management level. As long as you work hard and focus at work to keep up with your job responsibilities, you can do your job around the things that are most important to you at home. It does require a lot of organization and discipline, but it is very possible and fulfilling.Dell Human Resources Business Partner, Kristen Tuohey, took 5 somewhat loud years off from her career to stay at home with her two young sons.Don’t let your self-doubt take over. Don’t look at your time away as a time when you’re “losing skills”. You are learning/gaining new skills that are completely transferable. And if you’ve ever spent your days caring for two rambunctious kids, you should know that you’re really ready for anything the workforce has to throw at you.Rebecca Bales, Dell Sales Strategy and Planning, left her career at Dell to tend to her ailing father for 3 years.  Do not under value the time you have spent away.  Look to create a list of the experiences you had during your time away and leverage those when determining your special set of skills.  This effort will help you in positioning your capabilities for your new role or when interviewing.   Do not apologize for this time.  Be proud of your accomplishments, the impact this has had on your family and leverage your inner strength.  It is tough to make the decision to leave the safety and security of what we know.  I encourage you to venture into the unknown with a passionate approach to whatever life brings.Laura Schmuelgen, Regional Product Manager Support & Deployment Product Group, took 8 years from her full time career to be a stay-at-home mom.Somewhere along the way – I learned how to take a step back and see the big picture.  I’ve come to the conclusion that the right choice is very individual and the worst critics of your choices are often because they are grappling with their own conflicting decisions. I felt criticized when I worked – when I stayed home – and when I chose to return to work. It’s given me a perspective about life in general, empathy and respect for different choices others make. It did take time for me to build back the confidence that I was as good – if not better than when I left the workforce. The key takeaways from these women that have walked in your shoes – don’t discount your network as a source for opportunities, and believe in your skills and what you have to offer.  All our life’s paths take different turns, some expected, some unexpected.  Taking the first step on your new path is the only way to see where it leads.last_img read more

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Group discusses voting

first_imgVoter registration and education on local political issues will create positive channels between Notre Dame students and the surrounding area, student body president Catherine Soler told Campus Life Council (CLC) Monday. Social Concerns chair Pat McCormick said the Center for Social Concerns and student government teamed up to get students involved in the election. CLC members supported the campaign to vote in local elections and learn more about important issues in the South Bend community. “We have put a lot of time and energy into this issue,” Soler said. “Voter registration gives us some of the best opportunities for community involvement.” Recent negative energy between Notre Dame students and South Bend Police created tensions that could be helped if members of the community see the student body reaching them through  the elections, Soler said. “We are encouraging students to take full membership in the community,” McCormick said. Finding the best way for each student to participate in the local community is the most important part of this project, Soler said. “What we are doing is essentially a three-tier process,” McCormick said. The campaign broke into components of education, registration of Indiana voters and involvement of out-of-state students in local elections, he said. “First, we are encouraging all students regardless of their state of residency to learn about the issues that affect us most,” McCormick said. “Education for voters is a huge part of this idea.” Second, students who are Indiana residents are strongly encouraged to register to vote and learn about dominant issues in their home state, he said. Third, out-of-state students can legally switch their permanent residence to Indiana in order to vote in local elections, McCormick said, but this change might cause problems post-graduation based on state policies. Some students might find the transition back to their home state more difficult after switching their permanent residency to Indiana, he said. “Students who are interested in that route should get advice from someone trained in legal issues to find out what that change would look like for them,” McCormick said.last_img read more

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Members support textbook rental

first_imgStudent Senate passed a resolution that encouraged professors to help students rent, rather than purchase, textbooks from the Hammes Notre Dame Bookstore for their classes. Academic Affairs chair AJ McGauley said the resolution will encourage professors to embrace the Rent-A-Text program, which was established this semester. “The idea of this resolution is to use it as a starting point for talking with professors and deans about using rentals,” McGauley said. Student government created Rent-A-Text so students could save money by renting textbooks from the Bookstore rather than buying them. “On average a student would save about 50 percent on the rental price of the buying price,” McGauley said. The Hammes Notre Dame Bookstore can only provide books for Rent-A-Text that appear a national list sponsored by the Follett’s or a local Follett’s list begun by the University. To add a textbook to a local list for Notre Dame, a professor must commit to use the textbook for four semesters. Professors must add textbooks to the local list and notify the Bookstore for final approval, McGauley said. McGauley said the program was successful during its inaugural semester, and student government hopes to expand the program. In the resolution, the senators resolved to encourage “that professors consider the Rent-A-Text program and the texts currently included in the national and local lists when selecting future material.” Nearly half of students surveyed about Rent-A-Text indicated they would rent more texts if more titles were available, the resolution said. Community Relations chair Claire Sokas said the resolution could help make more textbooks available to rent. “I am a science major,” Sokas said. “I could not rent a lot of my textbooks this year.” Lewis Hall senator Marina Seminatore said committing to a textbook for multiple semesters might restrict professors. “If they have to commit to four terms of use professors could still find another book they like better,” Seminatore said. “Committing to use the first might not be beneficial to their class.” The senators acknowledged not all professors could make Rent-A-Text work for their courses but said they hoped to see some expansion. The Senate passed the resolution unanimously.last_img read more

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New minor looks at Constitution

first_imgUndergraduates will have the chance to delve deeper into the nuances of government when the new David Potenziani Program in Constitutional Studies, a part of the political science department, launches as a minor program this fall. “For our undergraduates, we hope to offer a course of study that invites them to think deeply and broadly from a variety of perspectives and disciplines about the most fundamental questions of life and law,” Vincent Muñoz, a professor in the program, said. Muñoz said some of these questions include, “What is the proper relationship between government and civil society, between law and moral principles?” and “What are the philosophical foundations of human rights and constitutional democracy?” The minor has been in development for several years, but was proposed and accepted to the College of Arts and Letters this semester, Muñoz said. The minor will be open to all undergraduates, regardless of their college or career aspirations. “We hope that the minor will be particularly useful to those students who might have a vocation to careers in politics, law and public policy, but we hope that we serve all students interested in fundamental questions of justice, citizenship and the common good,” he said. Muñoz said the minor will be interdisciplinary in nature. Courses will come from the political science, philosophy, theology and history departments and even the law school, he said. Students are required to take five courses from four different components to complete the minor, Muñoz said. These components are, “Constitutionalism: History and Philosophy,” “The American Founding and American Constitutional History,” “Constitutional Government and Public Policy” and “Comparative Constitutionalism and International Law.” “These general categories will focus on the great political and constitutional debates in American and world history and on the underlying principles of constitutional government — for example, natural and civil rights, social contract theory, the market economy, voluntary associations, separation of powers, popular sovereignty and the rule of law,” Muñoz said. Muñoz said the gateway course for the minor will be Constitutionalism, Law and Politics, which he taught for the first time last semester. Sophomore Lizzie Helpling, who is considering the constitutional studies minor, took the course last semester and said it shaped her interest in the field. “I think the class itself really helped me develop a deeper understanding of constitutional thought and interpretation, especially in the American tradition,” Helpling said. In addition to the minor, Muñoz said the David Potenziani Program in Constitutional Studies will sponsor constitutional studies lectures. For starters, the program is sponsoring a lecture from Professor Jeffrey Tulis of the University of Texas titled “The Possibility of Constitutional Statesmanship.” The lecture will take place Feb. 6 in DeBartolo Hall 131 at 4:30 p.m., he said. “Once the minor begins, constitutional studies minors will be invited to meet with such visiting faculty members over lunch or dinner or perhaps at a faculty member’s house,” Muñoz said.last_img read more

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Alumnus shares design career trajectory

first_imgRyan Meinerding, the Head of Visual Development at Marvel Studios and 1999 Notre Dame graduate, spoke Monday night in West Lake Hall about his career in design and his work on various movies including Iron Man 2, Captain America and The Avengers.“I head up a team of artists that actually do all the character design for all of the marvel studios movies,” Meinerding said. “We also do key frame illustrations, which is going through the script and figuring out what the key moments are and how to visualize them. We illustrate and design things as early as possible in production so the director and producers can understand what the movie is going to look like before it’s made.”Meinerding said he dabbled in website and video game character design before working for Marvel Studios.“I began trying to do animation style work, but I learned very quickly that across all of the companies that do animation: Pixar, DreamWorks, Sony, there are basically three guys that do all of the animation,” he said. “The jobs that are design jobs for the other people are designing all the doors or all the tables in the films and I decided pretty quickly I wasn’t going to do animation, which is sad because I really enjoy it.“That’s when I started to do more realistic work, like live action film design.”Meinerding said he and his team focus on whatever story the filmmakers are trying to tell and align the spirit of the characters with the Marvel Universe.“The visuals of the movie define the tone, however dramatic or comedic, and that’s the driving force for the storytelling,” he said. “Behind that, we aim to be true to the comics. Other comic book movies that are being done not by Marvel Studios aren’t always using that as the basis for their films, but at Marvel we try to be true to the story of the film and true to the source material.”“We have a faith in the character and in the brand that’s been around forever,” he said. “Captain America has been around for over 70 years. We try to find what’s fantastic about that character and bring it to life, as opposed to reinterpreting or changing it.”One of the biggest challenges as a designer in the film industry is maintaining a sense of integrity and pride in your work, Meinerding said, while still putting out pieces at the demanding pace required by the industry.“It’s very easy to get beaten down by deadlines and say I can’t do something good,” he said. “That’s a constant challenge with concept art because things have gotten to the point where people are just using photocopying and using pictures as their bases and not taking pride in their work, they just want to get something done that looks realistic.”Meinerding said it can be challenging when his work is not selected as the final design, but that he has learned to step back as a manager and realize that the design that is chosen will be quality.“Our job is to present the best options that we are capable of preventing,” he said. “If I get to draw Captain America and it doesn’t get picked I’m still okay with that because I got to draw Captain America. It can get disheartening in some context like when politics are involved and they actively aren’t picking the best design, but because we’re in a place where I have hired a lot of people that I know are doing great stuff. If my stuff doesn’t get picked, I still know it’s going to be a good design.”Tags: Marvellast_img read more

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Orientation introduces transfer students to ND community

first_imgHearing “I have always wanted to go to Notre Dame” is not unusual on campus, but for senior Liz Hynes, who transferred to Notre Dame the fall of her sophomore year, this phrase has an entirely new meaning.“Coming to campus as a student for the first time is completely surreal,” Hynes said. “Among transfers, you’ve got a lot of lifelong dreamers who’ve had to wait for a second chance, so we’re doubly grateful.”Hynes said unlike typical undergraduate students, transfer students do not have the luxury of enjoying a full four years at Notre Dame. “Get out of bed every day. There will be days when you’re sick or exhausted, and you’ll be tempted to stay in bed for 12 to 24 hours,” she said. “Don’t do it.”Instead, Hynes said, she would advise new transfers to make the most of their time on campus.“We will never be this rich in time and opportunity again, where we can write for a newspaper and join student government and create art with our friends and study things we’ve always been curious about,” she said. “Life won’t always let us do all of these things at once. Life will make us choose. Don’t do that one second before you have to. Do everything. Get out of bed.”Junior Emily Schneider transferred last fall from Kansas State University, a school she said “could not have been more different than Notre Dame.”“I did not know what to expect from such a transition, but I immediately felt as if I belonged at Notre Dame and felt like a member of the Notre Dame family,” Schneider said.This year, Schneider, along with 24 other transfer students from previous years, will be leading the new transfers through their orientation process. “Transfer orientation helps so much and really helped me to feel like a second year student, instead of like a freshman again,” Schneider said. “It really helps students make strong friendships and bonds with other transfers in the same situation. I met some of my best friends during transfer orientation and could not be more grateful for the experience.”Instead of going through orientation with their respective dorms, transfers are divided up into small groups called “transfer families,” according to junior and transfer orientation leader Nick Olmanson. “The thing that I am most excited about is meeting all the new students in my transfer family. Leaders are grouped in twos and are combined with about six or seven new students to create a family,” Olmanson said. Olmanson said he hopes to be a good resource to his transfer family, even beyond orientation.“Last year my transfer family was pretty close. We organized dinners throughout the year and I hope to be able to build friendships like those,” he said. Transfer families tend to stay close, and Olmanson said several students from his transfer family went on to be co-rec flag football champions that year. “My transfer family was very influential for me and everyone I met got along great,” he said. “I remained close friends with them as the year went on. The leaders last year did a great job and my transfer parents specifically made me want to be a leader to give that great experience to the next transfer class.”Olmanson also said he encourages transfers to reach out to people in their dorms. “I am lucky to have a bunch of great guys living in my dorm as well.  I was able to meet them pretty early on in the year, so that made the transition easy,” Olmanson said. Hynes said the separation between the incoming freshmen and the transfer class is key. “While some other schools lump transfers in with incoming freshmen, Notre Dame keeps in mind that these students have already spent time in college and don’t need to start from square one,” Hynes said. “They’re already aces at college, otherwise they wouldn’t have been accepted as transfers. So we make sure they get an experience that assists specifically with their transition to Notre Dame.”Hynes described the welcome luncheon of transfer orientation as “the happiest room in the world.” “The energy that everyone’s sharing — the excitement, the anxiety, the relief at finally being here — it’s incredibly special,” Hynes said. Senior Jake Wagner, who transferred to Notre Dame for the 2014-2015 academic year, said he advises new transfer students not to get overwhelmed by the process. “I know I was very overwhelmed, and thought I wasn’t cut out for Notre Dame,” Wagner said. “Transferring to Notre Dame can be a very difficult transition for a lot of people, but things get better. Don’t forget that you have the transfer network here to help you.”Tags: Transfer, transfer orientation, Transfer-Olast_img read more

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Founder of #MeToo Movement speaks at Notre Dame

first_imgTarana Burke, the founder of the #MeToo movement, spoke to the Notre Dame community Monday evening about her leadership in activism against sexual violence in society. The lecture kicked off “Sex and the Soul Week,” an event week that seeks to promote dialogue about sexuality and faith on campus.The talk, moderated by Maria McKenna, professor of education and Africana Studies, was sponsored by Multicultural Student Programs and Services and cosponsored by the Gender Relations Center, Campus Ministry, the McDonald Center for Student Well-being and student government.During the talk, Burke described her early work as a camp youth leader and its large impact on her decision to pursue activism against injustice in society.“I started doing work around sexual violence almost by accident,” she said. “I was an organizer at a very young age. I started working when I was 14. Once I discovered what that was, and that I had the power to change things, I became very obsessed with [activism].”Anne Elizabeth Barr | The Observer A sexual assault survivor herself, Burke described her realization of the pervasiveness of sexual assault and violence — especially in communities of women of color — early on in her life.“Nobody in my world talked about sexual violence although many of us were survivors. We would find out by happenstance,” she said. “We sort of lived with this reality. As I was dealing with my own healing, as a part of that journey, I was also dealing with young people, young black girls in particular, who were carrying the same burdens. I was just a couple of steps ahead of them in recognizing what it was.”Burke founded the #MeToo movement in 2006 to create a community of women of color, particularly black women, who are survivors of sexual harassment and assault in need of a place for healing. This soon became a platform for activism against such a societal injustice.“#MeToo came from my inability to say, ‘Me, too,’ to a young person in a time I think she really needed to hear it and struggling with, ‘Why can’t I say this?’, ‘Why can’t I share my own story?’ and also, ‘Why are there so many people with such stories?’” Burke said. “It was a marriage of my sense of looking for where injustice is and where we can do something different and also seeing this as a community problem that no one was addressing.”It was not until October of 2017, however, that the #MeToo Movement took Twitter by storm after celebrity actresses came forward with sexual abuse accusations against film mogul Harvey Weinstein.Later that year, Burke was named one of the Silence Breakers on Time’s Person of the Year edition for her role as the founder of the movement.Burke discussed her reactions to the movement’s viral attention and momentum, describing the importance of not letting its growth get in the way of its original purpose — creating systemic change and healing for sexual assault victims, particularly for women of color.“It is not sustainable to build a movement over simply naming wrong-doers and not looking at the systems that they come out of and not looking at ways to dismantle those systems,” she said.Burke is currently the senior director of Brooklyn-based Girls for Gender Equity, “an intergenerational organization committed to the physical, psychological, social and economic development of girls and women,” according to the group’s site. Burke said she is working to direct the #MeToo movement back towards its roots of healing and activism.“Part of my job now is to talk about the movement and the vision of #MeToo,” Burke said. “Our vision is to make sure that survivors of sexual violence are able to craft a healing journey, and it’s also to inspire leadership amongst survivors and activate survivors as advocates in this work to end sexual violence.”Tags: #MeToo, Sex and the Soul Week, Tarana Burkelast_img read more

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