RSS for dummies Congress takes aim at Sangh as Rahul fights defamation

first_img LiveKarnataka floor test: Will Kumaraswamy’s 14-month-old govt survive? 0 Comment(s) It also alleged that “the RSS opposed liberalisation… In short and in shorts, the RSS is anti-development and fought against freedom when we fought for it”.The video also alleges that the RSS considers the ‘Manusmruti’ greater than the Constitution.The video comes a day after Gandhi formally resigned as Congress president while taking full moral responsibility for the party’s Lok Sabha poll debacle.In his four-page farewell letter, Gandhi also said the RSS succeeded in its mission to capture India’s institutions. Towards social politics Kulbhushan Jadhav ‘guilty of crimes’, will proceed further as per law: Imran Khan By PTI |New Delhi | Updated: July 4, 2019 9:04:59 pm Related News Gandhi on Thursday pleaded ‘not guilty’ in the court in the defamation case after he accused the RSS of being responsible for the murder of journalist Gauri Lankesh.Think you know what the RSS is all about, think again. The Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh has consistently participated in anti-India activities, including pledging loyalty to the British, instigating violence & assassinating Mahatma Gandhi. #RSSvsIndia pic.twitter.com/z0jK3sXuRa— Congress (@INCIndia) July 4, 2019“Think you know what the RSS is all about, think again. The Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh has consistently participated in anti-India activities, including pledging loyalty to the British, instigating violence & assassinating Mahatma Gandhi,” the Congress said on Twitter, using hashtag “RSSVsIndia”.“From the freedom struggle to the symbols of Indianness, the RSS has always opposed them. When freedom fighters were fighting the British, the RSS as an institution was bowing before the British. Opposing the “idea of India” has been the policy of the RSS,” the party also tweeted.The one-minute video titled “RSS for Dummies” alleged that RSS founder ‘KB Hedgewar ordered the Sangh not to participate in Satyagraha’. “Sangh leaders encouraged members to join the British civic guard… RSS’ non-participation in India’s Independence was complimented by their British masters… The Sangh opposed our national flag! Anti-national, much? Nathuram Godse shot and killed Gandhi,” the party claimed. Advertisingcenter_img Best Of Express 'RSS for dummies': Congress takes aim at Sangh as Rahul fights defamation case The video alleges that the RSS considers the ‘Manusmruti’ greater than the Constitution.On a day Rahul Gandhi appeared before a Mumbai court in a defamation case for his remarks against the RSS, the Congress on Thursday posted a video on Twitter about the Hindutva organisation alleging that it has “consistently participated in ‘anti-India’ activities”. “The stated objectives of the RSS, the capture of our country’s institutional structure, is now complete. Our democracy has been fundamentally weakened. There is a real danger that from now on, elections will go from being a determinant of India’s future to a mere ritual,” he wrote.“This capture of power will result in unimaginable levels of violence and pain for India. Farmers, unemployed youngsters, women, tribals, Dalits and minorities are going to suffer the most. The impact on our economy and nation’s reputation will be devastating. The Prime Minister’s win does not negate the breadth of corruption allegations against him; no amount of money and propaganda can ever hide the light of the truth.“The Indian nation must unite to reclaim and resuscitate our institutions. The instrument of this resuscitation will be the Congress party,” Gandhi said in his letter. ‘RSS activism at grassroots played major role in Lok Sabha polls’, says political scientist Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach J&K cops overhaul village defence committees, PDP says Centre design to arm RSS workers Advertisinglast_img read more

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UN chief calls for independent probe into Gulf tanker attacks

first_img Related News With Iran nuclear deal on the brink, US vows to choke off Iranian oil sales By Reuters |United Nations | Published: June 15, 2019 9:15:34 am Bolton says way is open for Iran to enter talks with US India should use diplomatic tools at its disposal to help de-escalate US-Iran tensions Somalia making progress but must tackle extremism: UN chief Antonio Guterres Guterres, who condemned the attacks on the tankers, was speaking on Friday alongside Arab League Secretary-General Ahmed Aboul Gheit after the pair met. (File)United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres called on Friday for an independent investigation to establish the facts and who was responsible for attacks on two oil tankers this week in the Gulf of Oman. Advertising U.N. political affairs chief Rosemary DiCarlo met with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif on Friday on the sidelines of a Shanghai Cooperation Council meeting in Kyrgyzstan, U.N. spokesman Stephane Dujarric said. He added that Guterres and his staff had been in contact with many of the countries concerned to tell them of the need to avoid any escalation.Guterres, who condemned the attacks on the tankers, was speaking on Friday alongside Arab League Secretary-General Ahmed Aboul Gheit after the pair met.Gheit told reporters that he did not believe an Arab country was “trying to obstruct naval lanes or to shoot itself in the foot by acting the way we have seen in the Gulf of Oman or in the Hormuz Strait.”“My call to our Iranian brothers – be careful and reverse course because you’re pushing everybody towards a confrontation that no-one would be safe if it happens,” he told reporters. Advertising The United States blamed Iran for the attacks on Thursday, a charge Tehran rejected. Amid the rising tensions, Guterres said he was available to mediate if the parties agreed, however, he added that “at the present moment we don’t see a mechanism of dialogue possible to be in place.”Tehran and Washington have both said they have no interest in starting a war, but this has done little to assuage concerns that the two arch-foes could stumble into a conflict. Guterres said the world cannot afford a major confrontation in the Gulf.“It’s very important to know the truth and it’s very important that responsibilities are clarified. Obviously, that can only be done if there is an independent entity that verifies those facts,” he told reporters, adding that he believed only the Security Council could order a U.N. investigation. Post Comment(s)last_img read more

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Iran will enrich uranium to any amount we want President Rouhani

first_img With Iran deal teetering on brink, Europeans assess next steps Iranian state television aired footage of mourners in the strait, as armed Iranian Revolutionary Guard fast boats patrolled around them. They tossed gladiolas into the strait as some wept.The July 3, 1988 downing of Iran Air flight 655 by the U.S. Navy remains one of the moments the Iranian government points to in its decades-long distrust of America. The U.S. Navy’s mistaken missile fire killed 290 people. The comments by President Hassan Rouhani come as tensions remain high between Iran and the U.S. over the deal, which President Donald Trump pulled America from over a year ago.Authorities on Monday acknowledged Iran broke through a limit placed on its stockpile of low-enriched uranium.An increasing stockpile and higher enrichment closes the estimated one-year window Iran would need to produce enough material for a nuclear bomb, something Iran denies it wants but the nuclear deal sought to prevent. Advertising Hassan Rouhani says Iran ready to talk to US if sanctions lifted Related News Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield 1 Comment(s) By AP |Tehran | Published: July 3, 2019 2:01:26 pmcenter_img Best Of Express UK says seized Iranian oil tanker could be released Advertising After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Iran nuclear deal, US iran trade tariff, US iran trade war, US Iran trade sanctions, US Iran trade deal The comments by President Hassan Rouhani come as tensions remain high between Iran and the U.S. over the deal, which President Donald Trump pulled America from over a year ago. (AP/File)Iran’s president warned European partners in its faltering nuclear deal on Wednesday that Tehran will increase its enrichment of uranium to “any amount that we want” beginning on Sunday, putting pressure on them to offer a way around intense U.S. sanctions targeting the country. Meanwhile, the U.S. has rushed an aircraft carrier, B-52 bombers and F-22 fighters to the region and Iran recently shot down a U.S. military surveillance drone. On Wednesday, Iran marked the shootdown by the U.S. Navy of an Iranian passenger jet in 1988, a mistake that killed 290 people and shows the danger of miscalculation in the current crisis.Explained | Behind Iran’s nuclear defianceSpeaking at a Cabinet meeting in Tehran, Rouhani’s comments seemed to signal that Europe has yet to offer Iran anything to alleviate the pain of the renewed U.S. sanctions targeting its oil industry and top officials.Iran’s nuclear deal currently bars it from enriching uranium above 3.67%, which is enough for nuclear power plants but far below the 90% needed for weapon-grade levels. “In any amount that we want, any amount that is required, we will take over 3.67,” Rouhani said.Meanwhile on Wednesday, relatives of those killed in the 1988 downing of the Iranian passenger jet threw flowers into the Strait of Hormuz in mourning. Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence last_img read more

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This 5000yearold mass grave hides a family tragedy

first_imgThis 5000-year-old mass grave hides a family tragedy By Michael PriceMay. 6, 2019 , 3:00 PM Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The 15 men, women, and children discovered in a 5000-year-old mass grave near the southern Polish village of Koszyce must have suffered brutal deaths: Each was killed by blows to the head. Yet the tidy, systematic nature of their burial suggests they were laid to rest with care. Now, new genetic analyses reveal the dead all belonged to a single extended family, offering an intimate glimpse of a Bronze Age tragedy.To discover their identities, a team of geneticists sequenced the genomes of all 15 skeletons. Once it was clear the individuals were closely related, scientists looked at their burial positions. They found that mothers were buried next to their children, and siblings were placed next to one another. Fathers and other older male relatives were conspicuously missing from the group, the researchers report today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.The dead belonged to the central European Globular Amphora culture—named for the bulbous pottery vessels included in graves—and were neighbors to the demographically distinct Corded Ware culture. Little is known about the interactions between those two groups, but some researchers speculate that as the Corded Ware culture expanded throughout Europe, competition for resources often boiled over into violence. One of those deadly outbreaks may have led to the killings of those in the Koszyce mass grave.center_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) But although the cause of the massacre isn’t known, it appears that the family’s elder men escaped—and therefore, the scientists say, may have been the ones to bury their dearly departed. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

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Philips introduces Ingenia Ambition X 15T MR with fullysealed BlueSeal magnet for

first_imgOct 1 2018Ingenia Ambition X combines fully-sealed BlueSeal magnet technology and workflow innovations for step-change in productivityRoyal Philips, a global leader in health technology, today launched the Ingenia Ambition X 1.5T MR. Incorporating Philips’ breakthrough BlueSeal fully-sealed magnet, the Ingenia Ambition X is the world’s first MR system to enable helium-free operations, reducing the chance of potentially lengthy and costly disruptions, and virtually eliminating dependency on a commodity with an unpredictable supply. The first commercial installation of the Ingenia Ambition X was recently completed at Spital Uster Hospital, a major provider of extended primary healthcare in the canton of Zurich, Switzerland. The Ingenia Ambition X is CE marked and has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).“We are very proud to be the first hospital in the world to offer this new cutting edge, resource-friendly MRI technology to our patients,” said Dr Andreas Steinauer, Chief Radiologist at Spital Uster Hospital, Switzerland. “With the new Philips Ingenia Ambition X our patients can have the best of two worlds: leading MRI technology with a smaller footprint. This new leaner platform will allow more sites to deliver advanced MRI technology to their patients, helping to improve patient care.”This announcement completes the renewal of the Ingenia MRI portfolio, which comprises fully-digital MRI systems, healthcare informatics and a range of maintenance and life cycle services for integrated solutions that support customers’ needs for first-time-right imaging, enhanced diagnostic capabilities and improved productivity.1.5T MR imaging is core to the day-to-day operations of radiology departments in the UK and around the world, supporting clinicians in the diagnosis of a wide range of patient conditions. As demand for care increases and budgets become more constrained, improvements in productivity of this diagnostic mainstay can have a significant impact. The Ingenia Ambition X can substantially improve overall efficiency, combining its revolutionary BlueSeal magnet with innovations that can reduce downtime, enable single operator workflow and speed up exam times by up to 50 %.“MRI provides exceptional diagnostic and therapy guidance capabilities, but it also places substantial operational demands on the hospital or imaging center due to requirements for installation, footprint and services,” said Ben Huard, Business Marketing Manager, MR at Philips UK. “With our breakthrough fully-sealed BlueSeal technology we’re dramatically cutting the amount of liquid helium needed to cool the magnet to less than half a percent of the current norm. The result is numerous customer benefits from a smaller, lighter and more flexible installation footprint, and a more efficient return to normal operations when required.”A wealth of innovations delivers step-change in MR productivityRelated StoriesPhilips recognised for quality and breadth of ultrasound productsPhilips announces launch of global movement to raise awareness for COPDPhilips sponsors research to help COPD patients breathe easierThe Ingenia Ambition X includes a range of innovative features that combine to deliver a step-change in productivity. With Philips’ EasySwitch services, the BlueSeal’s magnetic field can be easily turned off if an item becomes stuck in the bore. Once the problem is resolved, an in-house or Philips technician can initiate an automated ramp-up to bring the magnet back to field, minimizing operational downtime. A conventional MR typically requires two staff to manage daily operations. The Ingenia Ambition X combines guided patient setup and Adaptive Intelligence-driven SmartExam analytics for automatic planning, scanning and processing. This frees up time to enable a single operator to manage the full scan from the patient’s side with just a single touch of a button.Philips Compressed SENSE is an advanced acceleration application that reduces exam times by up to 50%. In addition, Philips VitalEye is a unique approach to detecting patient physiology and breathing movement. VitalEye technology and algorithms intelligently extract signs of breathing – allowing routine exam set-up time to occur in less than a minute, even for less experienced operators. Together, these innovations help to standardize and speed up workflow, allowing clinicians to focus on the patient.The Ingenia Ambition X is part of the all-new Ingenia digital MR portfolio and complements the recently introduced Ingenia Elition and Ingenia Prodiva MR solutions. For more information about Philips’ MR portfolio and to see how Philips’ MR Innovations are improving diagnostic speed, comfort and confidence visit the next MR wave webpage. Source:https://www.philips.com/last_img read more

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Duty Calls Popular Shooter Back to World War II

first_imgEven though this game promises greater realism, thanks to improved graphics and gameplay, Activision and developer Sledgehammer Games may be ensuring that it has something for everybody.Few details were provided, but based on the trailer and the official website, Call of Duty: WWII could include the popular “zombie” cooperative mode. This has been a regular staple of the series since 2008, with the release of Call of Duty: World at War, appearing in the subsequent Call of Duty: Black Ops titles.”This helps give the game a low barrier of entry, and promises to have something for different tastes,” noted Recon Analytics’ Entner.”This is for those who are in a beer-and-pretzels mood and want silly fun,” he said. “It is a way to get away from the realism that the other half of the game offers.” Call of Duty will return to its World War II roots when the latest title arrives this November, publisher Activision Blizzard announced on Wednesday. The franchise has been a steady hit maker since its 2003 debut. Various titles in the series have become regular staples in e-sports tournaments and Major League Gaming.Call of Duty is one of the most popular series in video game history, selling a combined 175 million copies — second only to Take 2’s Grand Theft Auto franchise. The game has passed US$11 billion in total lifetime revenue.Although the series has been a robust seller for Activision Blizzard, the critical response to recent titles hasn’t been as strong. In Call of Duty: WWII, the game once again set its sights on the military exploits of the Greatest Generation, including the D-Day landings.The upcoming game will feature both a single player campaign, which will allow players to take the role of various characters at different points in the war, and an online multiplayer mode. The campaign will take place largely in the latter stages of the war, as the Allies liberate Nazi-occupied Europe.Based on what has been announced so far, it seems that players will assume the role of Private Ronald “Red” Daniels of the American 1st Infantry Division. They can opt to fill the shoes of a British soldier as well, and even play as a member of the French resistance. Peter Suciu has been an ECT News Network reporter since 2012. His areas of focus include cybersecurity, mobile phones, displays, streaming media, pay TV and autonomous vehicles. He has written and edited for numerous publications and websites, including Newsweek, Wired and FoxNews.com.Email Peter. Return to Duty Sledgehammer Games, an independent but wholly owned subsidiary of Activision, is the developer of Call of Duty: WWII. The studio codeveloped Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3 with Infinity Ward, and it also developed Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare.The game has not yet been rated. The original Call of Duty, which came on the heels of Electronic Arts’ Medal of Honor and Battlefield 1942 titles, scored a direct hit when it launched in 2003. Gamers couldn’t seem to get enough World War II action.”The original Call of Duty was certainly helped by those other titles — but really by the number of World War II movies that brought the conflict to the mainstream again,” said Entner. “It was the beginning of the war on terror, and the game combined elements of heroism and patriotism, and people wanted to play out the exploits of these heroes.”As the very real war on terror drags on without an end in sight, the modern conflict setting may have run its course, but the question is whether today’s gamers will be interested in returning to World War II again.Call of Duty won’t be the first franchise to jump back to an earlier era. EA’s Battlefield 1 last fall proved gamers may have interest in period pieces. That game was one of the top sellers of last year, suggesting that fans may be ready for something different — but there are still risks.”Games, like movies, have a huge upfront cost, and this is why we see so many sequels,” said Entner. “At the same time, the sequels need to be more than just more of the same.” History vs. Gaming It’s possible some people with an interest in history will be drawn back to games, thanks to this World War II setting.”I did witness a spurt of WWII awareness during the original Call of Duty’s popularity that I would attribute directly to the game,” said John Adams-Graf, editor of Military Trader, a publication devoted to military memorabilia and historical re-enactors.”While its release was about the same time as the epic WWII film, Saving Private Ryan, followed by the HBO series, Band of Brothers, the level of interest in WWII small arms that I witnessed at that time probably had more to do with the game than with Hollywood,” Adams-Graf told TechNewsWorld.The game could heighten awareness of the historical event as well.”The depth of detail and in-game resources will give any gamer immediate access to more information about WWII, the men and women who served, and the weapons that were used,” he added. Total War Every Bullet Counts Sledgehammer Games has promised that Call of Duty: WWII will be different from other shooters, as it attempts to reimagine the traditional first-person shooter model. Notably, the game will have a darker tone that doen’t shy away from the graphic horrors of war, and it apparently will ditch one of the genre’s longstanding features, namely the health-regeneration systems.This means every bullet could have the character’s name on it, and while technically it won’t mean “game over,” it should change the gaming experience.”This is going to be a more hardcore game, where the skill curve is greater and the challenges harder,” said Roger Entner, principal analyst at Recon Analytics.”The graphics will also be more realistic, and that could make the violence seem even more intense,” he told TechNewsWorld.”However, we have to realize that this is a title aimed at mature gamers, and today the average age for those gamers is in their 30s,” Entner added. “This isn’t a game for kids, but gamers are more than kids today.”last_img read more

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First Impressions iPhone X Garners Lots of Cautious Thumbs Up

first_imgMissing Home Button Whatever the critics say about the X, it likely will be a success in the market.”It’s a visibly different iPhone design and there’ll be enormous demand for it,” said Ian Fogg, a mobile and telecom analyst with IHS Markit.”Apple has done what it set out to do,” he told TechNewsWorld. “They set out to create a phone that is their vision for the future of the smartphone, and they’ve done precisely that.”The market’s reception should be positive, noted Ross Rubin, principal analyst at Reticle Research.”For those who want the best from Apple, this is the phone for them,” he told TechNewsWorld.The X will do well in the market, predicted Bob O’Donnell, chief analyst for Technalysis Research.”It’s got a cool design and all the things people are looking for these days in a smartphone,” he told TechNewsWorld. “It’s distinctly different from any other iPhone, and for that reason, big iPhone fans will go for it.” With the X, Apple scrapped using a fingerprint reader to unlock the phone and has gone to a facial recognition scheme. Many critics expected that feature could be critical to the phone’s success, but reserved judgment because they didn’t have time to truly test it at the Apple event Tuesday.”Overall, it’s much better than the face-unlock systems we’ve seen on other smartphones, but we’ll have to really test it out in harsher conditions — and try to fool it, of course,” wrote The Verge’s Patel.Another radical departure for Apple is the elimination of the “home” button in the X. It’s been replaced by screen gestures, like swiping. That change has detractors and supporters among early reviewers.”Swiping is easy, but it isn’t as easy as hitting a button, and it may throw some people off at first,” wrote Farhad Manjoo for The New York Times.”The learning curve will be interesting to watch,” he added.”After years of mashing the home button, using the iPhone X was… very strange for the first few minutes,” wrote Engadget’s Velazco.”Once everything clicked, I was shocked that Apple hadn’t tried to do this sooner,” he continued. “It feels incredibly natural, to the point where after a few minutes of playtime, I really don’t want to go back to the 7 Plus.” Tech critics hailed the X’s design.”The new iPhone X is easily the best-looking phone Apple’s ever made,” TechRadar’s Beavis wrote.”We were fans of the industrial design that heralded the arrival of the iPhone 4, and the curved lines of the iPhone 6,” he continued. “But it feels like the new phone takes all of those ideas and smashes them into the future.”Others found the X’s size a definite plus.”This phone gives you the jumbo screen size of a Plus model into the compact body size of the non-Plus iPhones,” wrote David Pogue for Yahoo Finance.”That’s a big, big deal for anyone who loves the features of the Plus models (a zoom camera lens, longer battery life, huge screen) but isn’t crazy about wielding a phone the size of a VHS cassette,” he added. Enormous Demand for X “The iPhone X is one of the most exciting phones released this decade — but not because it offers anything particularly innovative or new,” wrote Gareth Beavis for TechRadar.”It’s exciting because it’s the most radical redesign of an iPhone yet,” he continued, “tying together a number of key trends in the industry and adding in a level of polish that will attract legions of Apple fans to upgrade, and spend another couple of years in the iCycle.”A sore point with many reviewers was the mobile’s price. A unit with 64 gigabytes of storage costs US$999 and one with 256 GB costs $1,146.Not all reviewers were annoyed by the pricing, though.”The thing that a lot of people want to talk about with the iPhone X is its $999 starting price, but when you have the phone in your hand, it feels… worth it,” wrote Nilay Patel for The Verge. John P. Mello Jr. has been an ECT News Network reportersince 2003. His areas of focus include cybersecurity, IT issues, privacy, e-commerce, social media, artificial intelligence, big data and consumer electronics. He has written and edited for numerous publications, including the Boston Business Journal, theBoston Phoenix, Megapixel.Net and GovernmentSecurity News. Email John. The X’s 5.8-inch OLED “Super Retina HD Display” made a favorable first impression with many evaluators.”If the planned effect of the iPhone X was to wow with its display, it’s certainly done that,” TechRadar’s Beavis noted. “The colors are just so vivid on the all-screen front, and it truly feels like you’re holding one of the iPhone concepts we wrote about years ago.”To give the X an edge-to-edge look, Apple had to shrink the bezels around the display. As thin as the bezels are, though, they aren’t thin enough for everyone.”What did bother me a little more than expected were the bezels that run around the screen,” wrote Chris Velazco for Engadget.”To be absolutely clear: they’re really not that big, and I expect most people thinking about dropping $1,000 on a phone couldn’t care less,” he explained. “Still, given that Apple’s competition has done an incredible job trimming the cruft from around their displays, I can’t help but feel that the iPhone X’s design doesn’t have the same kind of impact as, say, the Essential or Samsung’s recent Galaxys.” Smashing Ideas Into the Future A Display That Wows Apple on Tuesday raised the curtain on its next-generation iPhone X, and it so far has been greeted with praise — though tentative — from early hands-on reviewers.For the most part, they gave the X kudos for design and build, but reserved their unequivocal endorsements until they could spend more time with the phone.last_img read more

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Retention in HIV care declines following release from incarceration

first_imgOct 10 2018Fewer than half of people with HIV are retained in care three years after release from incarceration, according to a study in the U.S. published October 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Kelsey Loeliger of Yale School of Medicine, and colleagues. The findings also suggest that better access to health insurance and transitional case-management services may improve retention in HIV care and viral suppression in this population. Source:https://www.plos.org Credit: Staff Sgt. Charles Rivezzo, 60th Air Mobility Wing Public Affairscenter_img Fewer than half of people with HIV are retained in care three years after release from incarceration, according to a study in the U.S. published October 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Kelsey Loeliger of Yale School of Medicine, and colleagues. The findings also suggest that better access to health insurance and transitional case-management services may improve retention in HIV care and viral suppression in this population.HIV prevention and treatment strategies aim to reduce HIV-related morbidity, mortality and transmission by retaining people with HIV in care and sustaining them on antiretroviral treatment to achieve viral suppression. Few prior studies have described long-term retention in HIV care or viral suppression for people transitioning from prisons or jails to communities. This is an important knowledge gap because HIV and incarceration are overlapping epidemics that disproportionately affect people who are already marginalized by homelessness, substance use and psychiatric disorders, and socioeconomic status. To examine this issue, Loeliger and her colleagues conducted one of the longest assessments to date of retention in care and viral suppression in a large cohort of incarcerated people living with HIV.Related StoriesTwo new studies develop algorithms to identify patients at risk of acquiring HIVEven when HIV prevention drug is covered, other costs block treatmentReprogramming cells to control HIV infectionThe authors merged statewide databases from the Departments of Public Health and Correction on all people living with HIV who were released from prisons or jails in Connecticut between 2007 and 2011. Among 1,094 individuals included in the study, continuous retention in care declined over the three following years (67.2%, 51.3%, and 42.5%, respectively). Sustained retention in HIV care (RIC) and viral suppression (VS) three years after release were independently associated with older age (RIC: Adjusted Odds Ratio = 1.61]; 95% Confidence Interval [1.22, 2.12] and VS: AOR = 1.37; 95% CI [1.06, 1.78]), having health insurance (RIC: AOR = 2.15; 95% CI [1.60, 2.89] and VS: AOR = 2.01; 95% CI [1.53, 2.64], and receiving more transitional case-management services. Moreover, better treatment outcomes were strongly associated with receiving antiretroviral therapy during incarceration (RIC: AOR = 1.33; 95% CI [1.07, 1.65] and VS: AOR= 1.91; 95% CI [1.56, 2.34] and early access to care after release (RIC: AOR = 2.64; 95% CI [2.03, 3.43] and VS: AOR = 1.79; 95% CI [1.45, 2.21]).Taken together, the findings suggest that dedicated resources are needed to optimize people’s HIV care while they are in prison or jail and link them to care following release. Although prior studies suggest that prison provides a temporary window of opportunity to reconnect people to care, supporting community-based retention in HIV care efforts is critical for improving long-term treatment outcomes.last_img read more

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Consumption of antibiotics for children varies widely from country to country finds

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Dec 4 2018Researchers analyzing the sales of oral antibiotics for children in 70 high- and middle-income countries found that consumption varies widely from country to country with little correlation between countries’ wealth and the types of antibiotics. Of concern is the relatively low-level use of amoxicillin, an antibiotic to treat the most common childhood infections. In addition, the review found the sale of antibiotics which should only be used for specific indications, or ‘Watch’ antibiotics in a quarter of all countries accounted for 20% of total antibiotic consumption. This is of concern since there is a higher risk of bacteria developing resistance to ‘Watch’ antibiotics.In 2017, the World Health Organization (WHO) grouped antibiotics into three categories – Access, Watch and Reserve – with recommendations on when each category should be used to ensure antibiotics are available when needed, and that the right antibiotics are prescribed for the right infections. This categorization is designed to enhance treatment outcomes, reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria, and preserve the effectiveness of ‘last-resort’ antibiotics when all others fail.Related StoriesNew network for children and youth with special health care needs seeks to improve systems of carePuzzling paralysis affecting healthy children warns CDCResearchers identify gene mutations linked to leukemia in children with Down’s syndromeWhile the report finds the consumption of ‘Access’ antibiotics made up on average 76% of child-appropriate antibiotic formulations across all countries, the use of Amoxicillin in community practice is relatively low (median 31%). Categorized by WHO as an ‘Access’ antibiotic, amoxicillin should be used as first choice for most common antibiotic treatment indications encountered in community practice.Dr Julia Bielicki, Senior Lecturer at St George’s, University of London, and study lead said: “This is the first attempt at developing simple metrics of global child community antibiotic use based on the WHO’s grouping. The data can be used by countries to assess their antibiotic use patterns for young children. Countries with low Access percentages can identify opportunities for greater use of these antibiotics. Unnecessary use of Watch antibiotics is more clearly identifiable.”The research was supported by GARDP, the Global Antibiotic Research and Development Partnership. Dr Manica Balasegaram, Executive Director of GARDP, said: “WHO strongly encourages use of ‘Access’ antibiotics to treat the majority of infections for children and adults as they are affordable, generally less toxic and less likely to drive future antibiotic resistance. Providing country policymakers with evidence on what antibiotics are being prescribed in their country is an important first step to help countries tackle inappropriate prescribing of antibiotics. This in turn will help countries deliver their National Action Plan on antimicrobial resistance and ensure antibiotics remain available and effective for generations to come.””Consumption of oral antibiotic formulations for young children according to the WHO AWaRe groups; an analysis of sales data from 70 middle and high-income countries” is published in Lancet Infectious Source:https://www.sgul.ac.uk/news/news-archive/global-review-finds-consumption-of-children-s-antibiotics-varies-widely-with-little-correlation-between-countries-wealth-and-types-of-antibiotics-prescribedlast_img read more

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Massage helps relieve pain improve mobility in patients with knee osteoarthritis

Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Dec 14 2018Short-term improvements in symptoms suggests massage could complement treatmentPatients with arthritis in their knees experienced significant improvement in pain and mobility after undergoing a weekly, whole-body massage for two months, according to a study led by researchers at Duke Health.The finding, appearing online in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, suggests that massage could offer a safe and effective complement to the management of knee osteoarthritis, at least in the short term.”Osteoarthritis is a leading cause of disability and affects more than 30 million people in America,” said lead author Adam Perlman, M.D., program director of the Leadership Program in Integrative Healthcare at Duke University School of Medicine. “Medications are available, but many patients experience adverse side effects, raising the need for alternatives. This study demonstrates that massage has potential to be one such option.”Related StoriesResearch suggests new way to improve the efficacy of arthritis drugStill-to-be-approved drug proves to be new option for treating active rheumatoid arthritisMultiple breaches of injection safety practices identified in New Jersey septic arthritis outbreakPerlman and colleagues at four institutions enrolled approximately 200 patients with osteoarthritis in their knees. Patients were randomly divided into three groups: those who received a one-hour, weekly Swedish massage for eight weeks; those who received a light-touch control treatment; and those who received no extra care other than their usual regimen.After eight weeks, each of the groups were again randomized to continue with massage or light-touch every other week, or to receive no treatment for the remainder of the study, which spanned 52 weeks.Patients were assessed every two months using a standardized questionnaire called the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index. The questioinnaire measures pain, stiffness and functional limitations, including how well patients can climb stairs, stand up from sitting or lying down, bend, walk or get out of a car, among other activities.At eight weeks, massage significantly improved patients’ scores on the questionnaire compared to light-touch and usual care. Massage improved pain, stiffness, and physical function.At 52 weeks, the twice-monthly massages maintained the improvements observed at eight weeks, but did not provide an additional benefit. There were no significant differences between the groups at 52 weeks.”Massage therapy is one of the most popular complementary medicine interventions,” Perlman said. “At a time when people are looking for effective non-medication options for pain, this study provides further evidence that massage has a potential role, at least for those suffering with osteoarthritis.” Source:https://corporate.dukehealth.org/news-listing/study-shows-massage-helps-ease-arthritis-pain-improve-mobility?h=nl read more

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Researchers compare scheduled vs emergencyonly dialysis among undocumented immigrants

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Dec 24 2018A unique opportunity made it feasible for uninsured patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who received emergency-only dialysis in Dallas, Texas, to enroll in private, commercial health insurance plans in 2015 and that made it possible for researchers to compare scheduled vs. emergency-only dialysis among undocumented immigrants with ESRD.This observational study included 181 undocumented immigrants, 105 of whom received insurance coverage and enrolled in scheduled dialysis and 76 of whom remained uninsured. Regularly scheduled dialysis (the standard of care for ESRD) compared with emergency-only dialysis (administered when a patient becomes life-threateningly ill) was associated with reductions in mortality, health care utilization and costs among patients with ESRD. The authors call for scheduled dialysis to be the standard of care for any patient with ESRD in the United States.​ Source:https://media.jamanetwork.com/news-item/study-compares-scheduled-vs-emergency-only-dialysis-among-undocumented-immigrants/last_img read more

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Cultural practices improve health of Indigenous women recovering from trauma of partner

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jan 31 2019The health of Indigenous women recovering from the trauma of partner violence improves when the healing process integrates elder-led circles and other cultural elements, finds new research from the University of British Columbia and Western University.The study tested the efficacy of a unique program, called Reclaiming our Spirits, that focused on nurses working with women individually over the course of six to eight months, and weekly circles or group activities led by an elder. The latter activities included sharing personal stories and aspects of Indigenous culture through ceremonies, cultural teachings and traditional crafts.Related StoriesComplement system shown to remove dead cells in retinitis pigmentosa, contradicting previous researchResearch on cannabis use in women limited, finds new studyTrump administration cracks down on fetal tissue researchThe approach was developed in collaboration with Indigenous elders and advisers.”At the end of the program, the women reported significantly fewer symptoms of trauma and depression and a better quality of life compared with how they felt in the beginning,” said lead researcher Colleen Varcoe, a professor of nursing at UBC. “Participants also experienced a greater sense of self-empowerment and felt more supported by their family and community.”These effects persisted at least six months later, Varcoe added.Participants included 152 Indigenous women from different nations and language groups who were living in Vancouver and Surrey, B.C. Most had survived childhood abuse in a residential school, in addition to partner violence; all were living on incomes much lower than the Canadian average and faced racism and other forms of discrimination on a regular basis.The study highlights the importance of a holistic approach towards healing for Indigenous survivors of intimate partner violence, said study co-author Roberta Price, an elder from the Coast Salish Snuneymuxw and Cowichan Nations.”For these women, treatments can be much more effective if they integrate Indigenous ways of knowing and being, such as sharing culture through storytelling, teachings and ceremonies,” said Price.The program, which is based on iHEAL, a health promotion program developed by the researchers a few years ago, is currently being tested in three provinces to see if it is effective for women in all settings, including for Indigenous women.”Indigenous women in Canada experience high rates of violence, including from their partners, and yet there are few evidence-based interventions designed specifically for them,” said Varcoe. “Our hope is that with iHEAL, we can contribute to turning the situation around.” Source:https://www.ubc.ca/last_img read more

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Google Maps for cancer Imagebased model accurately represents blood traffic inside tumors

first_imgPoor representations of the tumor ‘microenvironment’ make models and the research based on them less accurate. So I thought, how I can use my imaging expertise to improve the information available to modelers?”Arvind Pathak, Associate Professor of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and a Member of the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center To create a model that more precisely reflected the structure and behavior of tumors, his research team implanted mice with human breast tumor cells and imaged the resulting tumors using 3D magnetic resonance microscopy and micro-CT imaging. These high-resolution 3D images provided detailed information about a tumor’s volume and the structure of its blood vessel networks.With the underlying blood vessel structure mapped, Pathak and his research team scoured the scientific literature to find information on how these structures would likely behave in a living system. Specifically, they searched for studies that included measurements of blood pressure, blood flow and volume in vessels similar to those seen in their tumors.Using this information, the group collaborated with Aleksander Popel’s Systems Biology Laboratory in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine to develop a set of mathematical formulas designed to represent these aspects of tumors. They did this by combining data from previously published studies with the information they collected.“The image-based model comprises thousands of data points about the predicted blood flow and intravascular oxygenation throughout tumors,” Pathak says.Related StoriesSurgery can be beneficial for one type of primary central nervous system lymphomaSmarter, more educated people get a cognitive ‘head start’, but aren’t protected from Alzheimer’sResearchers develop new artificial intelligence tools to find cell’s true identityThe next challenge for the group was to make the information they collected easy to see and understand, in much the way that web-based geographical maps can be easily seen and overlaid with different kinds of useful information such as travel time, traffic activity, detours and average speed.“We had to create a completely new way to represent the information we had generated so that it is meaningful and not overwhelming to those who need to understand and use it,” says Pathak.To do that, Pathak recruited Akanksha Bhargava, Ph.D., a mechanical engineer and postdoctoral fellow in the Systems Biology Laboratory, to build on the mathematical models established by Spyros Stamatelos, Ph.D. We brainstormed about different ways to superimpose the modeling results onto the underlying blood vessel geometry without compromising the complexity and richness of the data.”Akanksha Bhargava, Ph.D., a Mechanical Engineer and Postdoctoral Fellow in the Systems Biology Laboratory The result, he says, was a 3D representation of the blood vessel network of each tumor with a color-coded map of the traffic-like movements of blood through the vessels that feed it. “It looked an awful lot like Google Maps,” says Pathak, “The blood vessel segments are the streets and the blood flow in each segment is analogous to the traffic along each street.” And like mapping apps, he says, the model gives researchers a more accurate depiction of what is happening within a tumor at any given time, adds Pathak. These compelling visualizations have already garnered the attention of the scientific community and were featured as the “biomedical picture of the day” by the MRC London Institute of Medical Sciences.Pathak says the team plans to make these images freely available to the scientific community for research purposes. The model can be made interactive, so that users can alter parameters such as the width of blood vessels to observe the effect on blood flow and the delivery of drugs or other treatments on the tumor.The investigators caution that the approach is not directly applicable to human tumors yet. But, says Pathak, “As our ability to obtain high-resolution images in the clinic improves, we hope that this tool can be adapted to provide a noninvasive way to predict the behavior of an individual patient’s cancer and customize their therapy.”At present, the model should be useful for bioengineers and cancer biologists to more easily study aspects of tumor biology “in silico,” as well as conduct tests for potential therapies.Sources:https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/news/newsroom/news-releases/google-maps-for-cancer-image-based-computer-model-reveals-finer-details-of-tumor-blood-flow-behaviorcenter_img Credit: Johns Hopkins MedicineThis work was published March 27 in Nature Scientific Reports.Arvind Pathak, Ph.D., the study’s leader, says the project was developed out of the need to address the complexities of cancer biology in growing and developing tumors. He saw the need for better predictive models, as many existing models employed rudimentary approximations of the complex geometry of a tumor’s blood vessels. May 7 2019Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have developed something akin to a “Google Maps” approach for more accurately computing and visualizing the structural and functional blood vessel changes needed for tumor growth. By pairing high-quality 3D imaging data of tumor specimens from animal models with sophisticated mathematical formulas, the researchers say they now have a model that accurately represents blood traffic inside tumors, including the complex blood flow, oxygenation and structural changes that occur.last_img read more

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Researchers find link between maternal obesity and childhood cancer in offspring

first_imgWe are dealing with an obesity epidemic in this country. From a prevention point-of-view, maintaining a healthy weight is not only good for the mother, but also for the children, too.”Senior author Jian-Min Yuan, M.D., Ph.D., professor of epidemiology at Pitt Public Health and co-leader of the cancer epidemiology and prevention program at UPMC Hillman Cancer Center Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jul 10 2019A new study from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health and UPMC Hillman Cancer Center found that children born to obese mothers were more likely to develop cancer in early childhood.Using Pennsylvania birth records, the researchers found a correlation between pre-pregnancy body-mass index (BMI) in mothers and subsequent cancer diagnosis in their c, even after correcting for known risk factors, such as newborn size and maternal age. The final version of the paper published online today in the American Journal of Epidemiology.”Right now, we don’t know of many avoidable risk factors for childhood cancer,” said lead author Shaina Stacy, Ph.D., postdoctoral scholar in the Pitt Public Health Department of Epidemiology and UPMC Hillman Cancer Center. “My hope is that this study can be, in a way, empowering and also motivating for weight loss.”Related StoriesNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerBacteria in the birth canal linked to lower risk of ovarian cancerHow cell-free DNA can be targeted to prevent spread of tumorsStacy and colleagues pored through nearly 2 million birth records and about 3,000 cancer registry records filed in the state of Pennsylvania between 2003 and 2016 and found that children born to severely obese mothers-;BMI above 40-;had a 57% higher risk of developing leukemia before age 5. Weight and height also were individually associated with increased leukemia risk.Further analysis showed that it wasn’t simply that larger women were giving birth to larger babies or that heavier women tended to be older-;known risk factors for childhood cancer-;but rather, a mother’s size independently contributed to her child’s risk.The researchers think the root cause of the effect they’re seeing has something to do with insulin levels in the mother’s body during fetal development, or possibly changes to the mother’s DNA expression that are passed to her offspring.Importantly, not all levels of obesity carry the same risk. Among the obese women in the study, higher BMI came with higher cancer rates in their children. So, even small amounts of weight loss can translate to a real reduction in risk, Stacy said. Source:Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburghlast_img read more

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Botulinum toxin may offer relief from chronic pelvic pain in women with

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Jul 11 2019Pelvic pain associated with endometriosis often becomes chronic and can persist (or recur) following surgical and hormonal interventions. According to results published in Regional Anesthesia & Pain Medicine, treating pelvic floor muscle spasm with botulinum toxin may relieve pain and improve quality of life. The study was conducted by scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health. Endometriosis occurs when the uterine tissue lining grows outside of the uterus and is estimated to affect up to 176 million women worldwide. It is an inflammatory condition that can lead to infertility and cause chronic pain. The usual gynecologic treatments include hormonal therapy and surgery to remove the growths. However, in many cases, pain returns after the interventions.In the study, women with surgically treated endometriosis who were generally taking hormones to suppress menses, but who continued to experience pain and had pelvic floor muscle spasm, initially received injections of botulinum toxin or saline as part of a placebo-controlled clinical trial, targeting areas of spasm. At least one month after the masked study injection, 13 participants chose to receive open-label botulinum toxin injections in areas that remained in spasm and were then followed for at least four months. These patients were described in the current study at the NIH Clinical Center.Related StoriesCase study: Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome in a patient with ALSWar against mosquitoes saves lives and money in Sri LankaVitamin D supplementation may not reduce the risk of heart diseaseIn all participants, during follow-up, pelvic floor muscle spasm was not detected or occurred in fewer muscles. Within two months of receiving the injections, pain decreased in all of the participants, with 11 out of 13 subjects reporting that their pain was mild or had disappeared. Additionally, usage of pain medication was reduced in more than half of the participants. Prior to receiving toxin injections, eight participants reported moderate or severe disability and after treatment, six of those patients noted an improvement.The participants experienced a decrease in muscle spasm and had pain relief that resulted in less disability and less use of pain medication. These findings suggest that pelvic floor muscle spasm may be experienced by women with endometriosis and contribute to pain persisting after standard treatment. Importantly, the beneficial effects were long-lasting, with many patients reporting pain relief lasting at least six months.Botulinum toxins, such as Botox, work by blocking the nerve signals for muscles to contract and have been used to treat migraines and certain movement disorders. Previous research has suggested that botulinum toxin may help women experiencing other types of chronic pelvic pain, but this treatment had not been studied in women with endometriosis.”We know that many doctors are using botulinum toxin to help their patients, but everyone uses slightly different techniques and methods, including different brands of toxin and various doses. This study will begin to provide rigor to help ensure standardized protocols and treatment in pelvic pain,” said Dr. Karp.Larger clinical studies will need to confirm the current findings. In addition, future research will focus on the mechanisms underlying chronic pelvic pain and better understanding of ways in which botulinum toxin may help treat those disorders. Source:NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and StrokeJournal reference:Tandon, H.K. et al. (2019) Botulinum toxin for chronic pelvic pain in women with endometriosis, a cohort study of a pain-focused treatment. Regional Anesthesia & Pain Medicine. doi.org/10.1136/rapm-2019-100529. The botulinum toxin injections were incredibly effective in decreasing pain levels, as well as patients’ use of pain medications, including opioids. Many of the women in our study reported that the pain had a profound effect on their quality of life, and this treatment may be able to help them get their lives back.”Pamela Stratton, M.D., a gynecologist and scientist at NINDS, who co-led the study with Barbara Karp, M.D., a neurologist and program director at NINDSlast_img read more

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New tool promotes greater sharing of clinical trial data by pharmaceutical companies

first_imgThe findings show that this scorecard and ranking system work. It’s one tool we can use to set standards and catalyze change in the industry.”Jennifer Miller Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jul 10 2019A tool developed by researchers at Yale, Stanford, and Bioethics International can promote greater sharing of clinical trial data by pharmaceutical companies. While nearly one-third of the companies that the researchers assessed met standards for sharing data, others could be more transparent to the benefit of science and the public, the researchers said.Their study was published in The BMJ (British Medical Journal).Since the late 1990s, new laws and regulations have increased requirements for pharmaceutical companies to register and report results from clinical trials. Yet, some companies don’t fully comply, and industry guidelines vary. To assess the data-sharing practices of large companies, lead author Jennifer Miller and her collaborators developed a new tool consisting of a set of standards and a ranking system.Related StoriesScientists revive pig brain cells four hours after death, providing hope for stroke patientsPioneering trial offers hope for patients with Parkinson’s diseaseCould deep brain stimulation help resolve the opioid epidemic?The researchers applied the tool to large pharmaceutical companies with drugs approved by the FDA in 2015. Initially, the investigators found that 25% of companies fully met their standards. Those standards included registering clinical trials, sharing data and study protocols publicly, and reporting requests for data on an annual basis.When given the opportunity to improve their score, a few companies responded, and the proportion of those meeting the standard rose to 33%. They did so by updating their policies to report annually or by adding timelines for data sharing, the researchers said. However, the study also found that some companies could go much further to share trial data in a timely and transparent way.Data sharing has many benefits, the researchers noted, including generating knowledge, promoting evidence-based guidelines, and maximizing use of data.”Data sharing is important for advancing development of new cures and therapies,” Miller noted.The next step for the team is to make annual assessments of companies’ data-sharing and transparency performance, and to expand the scorecard to address drug pricing and clinical trial design practices, said Miller. Source:Yale UniversityJournal reference:Miller, J. et al. (2019) Sharing of clinical trial data and results reporting practices among large pharmaceutical companies: cross sectional descriptive study and pilot of a tool to improve company practices. The BMJ. doi.org/10.1136/bmj.l4217.last_img read more

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Alcohol reduction associated with improved viral suppression in women living with HIV

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jul 11 2019Women living with HIV are less likely than men to achieve viral suppression with antiretroviral therapy. Reduction in alcohol use is a possible strategy to improve health outcomes in women with HIV, with evidence that unhealthy alcohol use (>7 drinks per week or >4 drinks per occasion for women) is associated with poorer adherence to treatment, lower rates of viral suppression, and faster disease progression.Several medications are available on prescription to help reduce drinking, including naltrexone, which is taken as a once-daily pill; however, none have been studied in relation to clinical outcomes in people with HIV. Researchers from universities in Florida have conducted a clinical trial, published in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, to understand the effect of naltrexone on drinking behavior and clinical outcomes in women with HIV who engage in unhealthy alcohol use, exceeding recommended drinking levels.Related StoriesReprogramming cells to control HIV infectionHIV DNA persists in spinal fluid despite treatment, linked to cognitive impairmentNovel method can help clinicians identify individuals most in need of PrEPAlmost 200 women with HIV who reported having more than seven drinks per week, or more than three drinks per occasion, were randomly assigned to take either daily naltrexone or a placebo pill for 4 months. The participants, most of whom were African American and receiving HIV antiretroviral therapy, were followed up for a total of 7 months and encouraged to adhere to their allocated treatment for four months.At the start of the trial all the women met criteria for unhealthy alcohol use, 62% met criteria for an alcohol use disorder, and only 63% had HIV viral suppression. Women in both groups substantially reduced their drinking over the course of the study; only around half of participants reported ongoing unhealthy alcohol use at four months, and this proportion continued to drop even after stopping the medication. Although women taking naltrexone initally showed a greater reduction in drinking than those assigned to placebo, there was no difference between the two groups from four months onwards; at seven months, 64% of women in each group had reduced or quit drinking.Laboratory analysis showed that HIV viral suppression was significantly more common among women who had reduced or quit drinking than in those who continued to drink at unhealthy levels; after 7 months, 74% of those who had reduced or quit drinking had HIV viral suppression, compared with 54% of those who had not cut their alcohol intake.While naltrexone has been shown to be effective in prior studies, the current decrease in drinking regardless of medication assignment suggests that repeated assessments and support that participants receive in a research study could serve to augment treatment success. Alcohol reduction was associated with improved HIV viral suppression, supporting recommendations for women living with HIV to avoid unhealthy alcohol use. Source:Research Society on AlcoholismJournal reference:Cook, R.L. et al. (2019) Reduction in Drinking was Associated With Improved Clinical Outcomes in Women With HIV Infection and Unhealthy Alcohol Use: Results From a Randomized Clinical Trial of Oral Naltrexone Versus Placebo. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. doi.org/10.1111/acer.14130.last_img read more

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Uber close to scrapping human backups in selfdriving cars Update

Explore further Uber plans to carry passengers in autonomous vehicles without human backup drivers in about the same time frame as competitors, which expect to be on the road at the latest sometime next year, the service’s autonomous vehicle chief said Wednesday. Citation: Uber close to scrapping human backups in self-driving cars (Update) (2018, January 17) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-01-uber-scrapping-human-backups-self-driving.html © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Waymo rolls out autonomous vans without human drivers Advanced Technology Group leader Eric Meyhofer wouldn’t give a specific start date but he said Uber won’t deploy the driverless cars without human backups unless they are proved safe.”Once we can check that box, which we call passing the robot driver’s license test, that’s when we can remove the vehicle operator,” Meyhofer said in an interview at an auto industry investors conference Detroit. “We’re going aggressively too.”Waymo, the name of the autonomous car unit of Alphabet Inc.’s Google, currently is testing on public roads in the Phoenix area without human backups and plans to carry passengers soon. General Motors Co.’s Cruise Automation has promised to start sometime next year in an unspecified location.Meyhofer said Volvo XC-90 SUVs are being prepared for the work. Uber Technologies Inc. has 215 test vehicles carrying passengers with human backups in Phoenix and Pittsburgh. They travel 80,000 miles per week gathering data and have given 50,000 paid rides, he said.Uber also is testing autonomous vehicles in Toronto and San Francisco but says it is not carrying passengers in them.San Francisco-based Uber started carrying passengers with autonomous vehicles in 2016, first with two Uber employees on board, Meyhofer said. The person in the passenger seat documented the vehicle’s behavior while the one on the driver’s side would intervene if the car needed help. The vehicles have improved to the point where Uber has removed one of the humans and now the backup driver enters data on a screen in rare cases, Meyhofer said.The ride service now has 1,600 people working on autonomous vehicles in the four test locations.Waymo said in November that it plans to carry passengers without human backups in a few months but gave no definite date. The testing would be done in a relatively small area that is covered by detailed three-dimensional maps.Meyhofer said Uber would start in the same way, gradually expanding the size of the area as mapping is done and vehicles become more capable. Currently the cars are limited to 40 miles per hour, Meyhofer said.Such testing likely will be done in warm-weather areas that don’t get snow. Meyhofer said Uber is still working on use of the cars when snow covers the lane lines and can’t be seen by cameras. “That’s all well within our scope. It’s just not in our scope today,” he said.The developments on the road come as self-driving car technologies are being battled over in court. Waymo has alleged that one of its top self-driving car engineers, Anthony Levandowski, stole its trade secrets before founding a startup that he sold to Uber for $680 million. Uber has denied the allegations. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

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UK lawmakers call on Zuckerberg to appear before them

The U.K. parliament’s media committee demanded Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg appear before the panel after lawmakers said the senior executive who testified Thursday failed to fully answer their questions about the data protection scandal that has engulfed the company. “We were slow to understand the impact at the time, and I am way more disappointed in this than you are,” Schroepfer said to laughter from the room.”It’s a high bar,” Collins retorted.”I’m sorry, I shouldn’t have said that,” Schroepfer replied. “It’s something we’re working very hard on.” Explore further “As an American citizen living in California, Mr. Zuckerberg does not normally come under the jurisdiction of the U.K. Parliament, but he will the next time he enters the country,” Collins said.”We hope that he will respond positively to our request, but if not the committee will resolve to issue a formal summons for him to appear when he is next in the U.K.”Collins sharply worded statement came after a session in which lawmakers demanded specificity, particularly in regard to the social media company’s actions on elections and alleged Russian interference.In one moment of candor, Schroepfer acknowledged that he himself was disappointed with Facebook’s handling of Russian disinformation campaigns. © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. A protester wearing a mask with the face of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, in between men wearing angry face emoji masks, during a protest against Facebook outside Portcullis in London, Thursday, April 26, 2018, as the Chief Technical Officer of Facebook Mike Schroepfer is due to give evidence on the companies use of data from its customers in front of a Parliamentary Select Committee. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant) Chief Technical Officer of Facebook Mike Schroepfer leaves Portcullis House after giving evidence to a Parliamentary select committee on digital, culture, media and sport in London, Thursday, April 26, 2018. The UK parliament’s media committee has criticized Facebook’s response to allegations that data from millions of accounts was misused during elections in the United States and Britain as they grilled one of the company’s senior executives about the scandal. (AP Photo) Committee members didn’t hide their frustration with Facebook’s chief technical officer, Mike Schroepfer, who was forced to defend the company against suggestions that it was cavalier with user data and has done little to stem the spread of fake news. Facebook dispatched the unassuming engineer to London despite a previous request for Zuckerberg to appear.During a four-hour plus session that covered many of Facebook’s perceived sins, lawmaker Julian Knight accused the company of “bullying journalists, threatening academic institutions and impeding investigations by legal authorities,” before declaring the company to be “a morality-free zone.”Schroepfer said he “respectfully disagreed” with such characterizations.Immediately after the session, committee Chairman Damian Collins issued a statement saying that said Schroepfer answer’s fell short “on 40 separate points,” particularly in regard to Cambridge Analytica and associated companies, which allegedly misused data from 87 million Facebook accounts.The committee asked Zuckerberg to appear on May 24, during what it described as a planned trip to Europe to give testimony to the European Parliament. Chief Technical Officer of Facebook Mike Schroepfer leaves Portcullis House after giving evidence to a Parliamentary select committee on digital, culture, media and sport in London, Thursday, April 26, 2018. The UK parliament’s media committee has criticized Facebook’s response to allegations that data from millions of accounts was misused during elections in the United States and Britain as they grilled one of the company’s senior executives about the scandal. (AP Photo) UK MPs demand Zuckerberg testify on data row after he offers deputy Citation: UK lawmakers call on Zuckerberg to appear before them (2018, April 26) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-uk-lawmakers-zuckerberg.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

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Novel microplate 3D bioprinting platform for muscle and tendon tissue engineering

first_img Citation: Novel microplate 3-D bioprinting platform for muscle and tendon tissue engineering (2018, June 13) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-06-microplate-d-bioprinting-platform-muscle.html Postholder insert for the printing of dumbbell-shaped muscle-tendon tissues in a 24-well plate (left above: postholder, right above: postholder in 24-well plate [top view], bottom: bioprinted muscle tissue in 24-well well plate differentiated for 14 days [top view]). Credit: Zurich University of Applied Sciences (ZHAW) More information: Sandra Laternser et al, A Novel Microplate 3D Bioprinting Platform for the Engineering of Muscle and Tendon Tissues, SLAS TECHNOLOGY: Translating Life Sciences Innovation (2018). DOI: 10.1177/2472630318776594 Explore further There is a strong need for medication that treats age-related degenerative muscle and tendon diseases. A critical bottleneck in the discovery and development of novel drugs for skeletal muscle is the lack of efficient and robust functional in vitro assays for compound screening. In a new SLAS Technology original research article available now for free ahead-of-print, researchers in Switzerland describe the development of a novel screening platform with automated production of 3-D muscle- and tendon-like tissues using 3-D bioprinting. The novelty and importance of this new approach is the combination of the automated musculoskeletal tissue production using 3-D bioprinting with a new microwell plate addressing the specific tissue attachment requirements. Thus, this screening platform represents a promising new tool for musculoskeletal drug discovery and development.Muscle and tendon tissue models are fabricated by printing alternating layers of photo-polymerized gelatin-methacryloyl-based bioink and cell suspensions in a dumbbell shape onto a newly designed cell culture insert in 24-well plates containing two vertical posts. The cells show high viability after printing in culture and good tissue differentiation based on marker gene and protein expressions.In addition, functionality of the muscle tissue models is demonstrated by calcium signaling of Fluo4-loaded cells and myofiber contractility induced by electrical pulse stimulation. Finally, the authors successfully fabricate tendon-muscle-tendon co-cultures by printing tenocytes around the posts of the cell culture inserts and myoblasts between the posts. Provided by SLAS (Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening) Decellularized muscle grafts support skeletal muscle regeneration to treat tissue loss This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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