Big Heavy World announces 1st Vermont music summit

first_imgJoe Adler, James Lockridge and Justin Hoy To Host Music Industry GatheringOn Saturday, January 14 ‘The 1st Annual Vermont Musicians Summit’ comes to Higher Ground. The event will bring together musicians and professionals from all facets of the Vermont music industry to take part in an array of music-related activities. From 5:30-7pm artists and industry pros alike are invited to come network, share stories, take part in panels and in all ways bring the Vermont music community closer together.Afterwards, doors open to the public at 8pm for a concert beginning at 8:30 and featuring performances from Kat Wright & The Indomitable Soul Band, Something With Strings, The Human Canvas, The Wind Woods w/ Brett Hughes, and more to be announced, including an all-star jam session with some very special guests.In the eyes of the three men behind the summit, the evening has been a long time coming. Musician, song-writer and Radio Bean stalwart Joe Adler admits that he has seen for a while the ‘need to get everybody together.” According to Adler, there is a collaborative attitude already at work in the Vermont music scene, ‘[Adler’s band] Wee Folkestra came out of this attitude, this is how [Adler’s weekly parties at Half Lounge] Burgundy Thursdays developed… everybody needs to meet.’ Despite this need for collaboration, Adler still sees a fair amount of disconnect amongst various Vermont music camps and looks to the summit to provide an open field for collaboration and education. He muses, ‘If we could bring everybody up to at least understanding the basics of everything…it would raise the bar.’ To that end, he, ‘want[s] to make it big, make it memorable, and hopefully get the word out to some of the more national musicians who live in Vermont.’ For Adler, ‘The summit is the meat and potatoes. The music after it is just the dessert.’Justin Hoy, the President/CEO and founder of Halogen Media Works was the one who had the initial vision for the summit. It occurred to Justin that, ‘We’ve been doing music for the local community for a long time, and I thought we should do something to bring the whole industry together.’ As the idea for the summit began to take shape Hoy reached out to Adler for help in attracting talent and putting together a program and to Jim Lockridge of Big Heavy World since, ‘I think Big Heavy is important as a building block for the Vermont music industry.’With the pieces coming into place, Hoy next turned his attention to finding an appropriate venue and quickly settled upon Higher Ground. Says Hoy, ‘I thought about all that Higher Ground does for local music and realized that it would be the place to have it. Also at Higher Ground we can have it be an all ages event.’ That the summit open to all ages is crucial to Hoy’s vision of an annual gathering, which he hopes will become a banner event for the entire Vermont music community. Hoy posits, ‘It’s important to have the summit as a yearly event to be able to have different headliners, showcase different headliners. The two things we’re going for here are having fans engage with the music and having industry people meet each other.’ To that end, Hoy sees the summit as a way to, ‘expand a dialogue between musicians and industry folks.’ This means that, ‘The summit will help musicians to see the back end behind when they book a gig. Lots of times when musicians book and play a gig they don’t necessarily see everything that goes on back behind the scenes.’ By uniting musicians with industry professionals of every stripe, Hoy hopes to ensure that everyone in the rapidly growing Vermont music scene understands every part of the industry, and knows the people responsible for making the industry work.Jim Lockridge, the man behind volunteer-run music advocacy organization Big Heavy World, sees the event as a natural extension of the work that the non-profit has been doing since its birth in 1996. According to Lockridge, ‘Big Heavy has always sought to bring the music in Vermont closer together and help individual musicians recognize the larger community… this summit is a social application of that.’ He believes that, ‘Ultimately what happens at the summit will give a charge to the musicians that come, and help them to recognize that there are other friends out there that are experiencing the same challenges.’ For Lockridge, the summit also provides a chance for ‘musicians that come to be introduced to the resources that Big Heavy World offers for free to the Vermont music community.’ These resources include promotion, event production, airplay on radio station 105.9 the Radiator, and even use of the brightly-painted Big Heavy World van for touring.Musicians and industry professionals of every kind are welcome to attend the free early evening summit and for those with ideas about activities or interest in putting together a panel, programming director Joe Adler is open to communication. Tickets for the concert are currently available to the public and are being sold for $8 in advance or $10 on the day of the show. With a talented and diverse line-up of musicians, and a wide cross-section of the Vermont music community already looking forward to the event, The 1st Annual Vermont Musician’s Summit should prove to be a unique gathering of every side of Vermont music, as well as a night filled with songs and fun for those young and old.Nick Kramer – BURLINGTON, VTlast_img read more

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80% of power generation growth in Texas seen as coming from wind or solar

first_img80% of power generation growth in Texas seen as coming from wind or solar FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence:More than 80% of the new power generation capacity expected to come into service in 2019 in the Electric Reliability Council of Texas region will be either wind- or solar-driven, according to an S&P Global Market Intelligence analysis.Overall, the region, which encompasses most of the state of Texas including major load centers such as Houston and Dallas/Fort Worth, is expected to see 10,440 MW of new capacity go online in 2019, with 6,934 MW, or 66.4%, from wind and another 1,706 MW, or 16.3%, from solar. Gas-fired capacity using combined-cycle and gas-turbine technologies totals 1,770 MW and accounts for 17.0% of the scheduled additions.Unlike in 2018, when more than 4,000 MW of coal-fired capacity was retired, no retirements are scheduled for the year. One coal-fired plant, however, is being mothballed indefinitely.More: ($) S&P Global Market Intelligencelast_img read more

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Curb climate change, protect environment to prevent future pandemics, countries told

first_imgLand degradation, wildlife exploitation, intensive farming and climate change are driving the rise in diseases that, like the coronavirus, are passed from animals to humans, United Nations experts said on Monday.The UN Environment Program (UNEP) and International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) jointly identified seven trends responsible for such diseases, known as zoonotic, calling on governments to take steps to stop future pandemics.These are: rising demand for animal protein, extraction of natural resources and urbanization, intensive and unsustainable farming, exploitation of wildlife, increased travel and transportation, food supply changes and climate change, it said. “The science is clear that if we keep exploiting wildlife and destroying our ecosystems, then we can expect to see a steady stream of these diseases jumping from animals to humans in the years ahead,” said UNEP Executive Director Inger Andersen.”Pandemics are devastating to our lives and our economies, and as we have seen over the past months, it is the poorest and the most vulnerable who suffer the most.”To prevent future outbreaks, we must become much more deliberate about protecting our natural environment.”About 60% of known infectious diseases in humans and 75% of all emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic, she said, largely due to the increased interaction between humans, animals and the environment. Topics :center_img The new coronavirus, which is most likely to have originated in bats, has infected more than 11 million people and killed over half a million people globally, according to the Johns Hopkins University.But it is just one in a growing number of diseases – including Ebola, MERS, West Nile fever, Zika, SARS and Rift Valley fever – that have jumped from animal hosts into the human population in recent years, said the report.Around two million people, mostly in developing nations, die from neglected zoonotic diseases every year. These outbreaks not only cause severe illness and deaths, but also result in major economic losses for some of the world’s poorest.In the last two decades alone, zoonotic diseases have caused economic losses of more than $100 billion. This does not include the cost of the COVID-19 pandemic, which is expected to reach $9 trillion over the next few years, said the report.Most efforts to control zoonotic diseases have been reactive rather than proactive, say experts. They want governments to invest in public health, farm sustainability, end over-exploitation of wildlife and reduce climate change.Africa – home to a large portion of the world’s remaining intact rainforests as well as fast-growing human population – is at high risk of the increased emergence of zoonotic diseases – but could also provide solutions, said experts.”The situation on the continent today is ripe for intensifying existing zoonotic diseases and facilitating the emergence and spread of new ones,” said ILRI Director General Jimmy Smith.”But with their experiences with Ebola and other emerging diseases, African countries are demonstrating proactive ways to manage disease outbreaks.”He said some African nations had adopted a “One Health” approach – uniting public health, veterinary and environmental expertise which can help to identify and treat outbreaks in animals before they pass to humans.The experts urged governments to provide incentives for sustainable land use and animal husbandry and to develop strategies for producing food that do not rely on the destruction of habitats and biodiversity.Monday is World Zoonoses Day, which commemorates the work of French biologist Louis Pasteur, who successfully administered the first vaccine against rabies, a zoonotic disease, on July 6 1885.last_img read more

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A home with strong rugby union credentials has hit the market again

first_imgThe home once owned by rugby union player Quade Cooper.AUSTRALIAN rugby star Quade Cooper’s second home has come back on the market, two years after he flipped it for $1.6 million.The five bedroom, three bathroom, two car garage house at 8 McDonald Street, Hawthorne, has seen some major changes happen in that time, as Brisbane’s southside saw a boom in interest.More from newsCrowd expected as mega estate goes under the hammer7 Aug 2020Hard work, resourcefulness and $17k bring old Ipswich home back to life20 Apr 2020The Queensland Reds’ player’s old backyard still has the “one of a kind” basketball halfcourt complete with custom graffiti art that he loved.But there is no doubting how much the area has surged with new neighbours in what used to be a vacant block off his backyard.The home was sold by Cooper in July 2015.The property is set to go to auction at 12.30pm on June 8.Agents Amaya Brookman and Darcy Lord of Place — Bulimba have the property open for inspection from noon to 12.30pm today.last_img read more

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Activist asset management can ‘create alpha’, says RWC

first_imgHe told IPE: “The regulatory uncertainties relating to, for example, the Alternative Investment Fund Managers Directive, have left European investors hesitant to look to alternative strategies. But we believe that will change.”Activist strategies are expensive strategies to run. However, the value proposition is higher due to the creation of alpha.”Mannix admits activism has historically had some negative connotations, as a result of the aggressive tactics of some investors, particularly in the US, where the market dynamics are supportive of more explicitly aggressive behaviour.He believes that, in Europe, activist fund managers generally only get things done when they have a positive relationship with corporate management.He added: “It is different in the European market. There, we have to have empathy with the local market dynamics that are varied across the different countries.”RWC took over the Focus Funds from Hermes in 2012. It has three strategies – Japan, UK only and pan-Europe.Mannix said: “We saw the opportunity to reposition the focus funds in the minds of investors and have seen significant inflows into the European strategy since the teams joined us.” Activism is essentially about being an alpha creator, according to investment manager RWC.But to date, activist funds are more widespread in the US.RWC chief executive Dan Mannix said: “In Europe, there is a lack of fund managers who do this well. In addition, there is a lack of capital support from European institutions.”However, Mannix said that, thanks to recommendations – for example, those coming from the UK’s Kay review – there is an increasing belief that fund managers have a duty to be good stewards and engage with the companies they invest in, increasing the interest in pure play activist managers.last_img read more

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BP’s earnings rise in Q3

first_imgUK-based energy giant and LNG player BP reported its underlying replacement cost profit, the company’s version of net profit, of $1.86 billion for the third quarter of 2017.The company’s underlying RC profit for the quarter jumped significantly compared to the $684 million recorded in the second quarter of the current year and $933 million in the corresponding period last year.BP’s oil and gas production in the third quarter averaged 3.6 million barrels of oil equivalent a day, 14 percent higher than in the third quarter of 2016.Net debt at September 30, 2017 was $39.8 billion, compared with $32.4 billion a year ago.Commenting on the results, BP’s CEO, Bob Dudley said, “This quarter, three new Upstream projects and the highest Downstream earnings in five years, underpinned by reliable operations and disciplined spending, have generated healthy earnings and cash flow. There is still room for further improvement.”Including amounts relating to the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, operating cash flow for the third quarter was $6.0 billion, compared with $2.5 billion during the corresponding period in 2016.last_img read more

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Bulker collides with small tanker off Philippine coast

first_img Image by the Philippine Coast Guard “MV Dawn Horizon skippered by Captain Jovar Arboleda failed to perform necessary action based on the advisory of Vessel Traffic Management System (VTMS) – Corregidor that she was nearly (approximately two nautical miles) at the collision course of MTKR Malingap,” Antonio Guiritan, RAD officer of MTKR Malingap, told PCG. The 2013-built Dawn Horizon is owned by Panama-based White Coral Maritime and commercially controlled by Japan’s NYK Line, VesselsValue’s data shows. Image by the Philippine Coast Guard The ships in question are the 207,400 dwt Capesize bulker Dawn Horizon and the 2,800 dwt small clean tanker Malingap. A Panama-flagged bulk carrier collided with a Philippine-flagged tanker off Luzon Point, Mariveles, Bataan, on 15 August 2020, the Philippine Coast Guard (PCG) said. Following the incident, Malingap filed a marine protest against Dawn Horizon to the Coast Guard Sub-Station Mariveles. Malingap reported no physical injuries to its crew members. However, the vessel suffered damages at its starboard bow bulwark, forecastle deck starboard side, starboard side access trunk, railings, fire hydrant and fire hose box, and starboard quarter, among others as a result of the sea collision. The 2016-built Malingap is owned by Philippine company Herma Shipping and Transport.last_img read more

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Joyce Roth, 69

first_imgJoyce A. Roth, 69, of Nebraska passed away at 2pm Saturday, March 5, 2016 at her home. She was born at Glendale, Ohio on October 17, 1946. She was married to Curtis Roth on December 24, 1999 and he survives. Other survivors include one step-son Dwayne (Holly) Roth of Sunman and four grandchildren. Mrs. Roth was a former employee of the Osgood Grub Company and also NAT, a division of Gecom in North Vernon. Mrs. Roth enjoyed feeding her birds outside as well as her parakeets in the house. Funeral services will be held on Wednesday, March 9th at 12pm at the Stratton-Karsteter Funeral Home in Versailles with visitation beginning at 10am. Burial will be in the Otter Creek Cemetery at Nebraska. Memorials may be given to the Versailles Church of Christ in care of the funeral home.last_img read more

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Bulldogs Victorious Against Squires

first_imgBatesville 7th grade improved to 10-1 on the year with a 55-27 victory over South Dearborn. Batesville gave great effort all night, methodically wearing the opponent down. Eventually pulling away right before the half, not letting up. Scoring for the dogs; Cade Kaiser (17), Jake Chapman (8), Carson Laker (6), Will Jaisle (6), Jacob Stenger (6), Gage Pohlman (4), Javier Jimenez (4), John Meyer (2), and Grant Goldsmith (2).  8th grade moved to 7-4 after defeating South Dearborn 35-27. South Dearborn began to make a run, but a last-second three by Chris Lewis to end the 3rd quarter helped gain momentum heading into the final quarter. Offensively the Bulldogs were led by Jack Grunkemeyer with 15 points, followed by Gus Prickel (8), Chris Lewis (3), Sam Johnson (3), Conner Drake (3), and Carter Bohman (3). Batesville is back in action Thursday at home against Milan.  Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Tyler Burcham.last_img read more

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