She IS Going…to London! Dreamgirls to Bow in West End

first_img This marks the first major production of the musical in London. It premiered on Broadway in 1981 and won seven Tony Awards. It was revived in 1987—two years after the original production had played its final performance. The 2006 screen adaptation starred Jamie Foxx, Beyoncé Knowles and Jennifer Hudson in an Oscar-winning performance. View Comments Dreamgirls is the story of a Supremes-style singing trio, who are torn apart by fame, fortune and inner group dynamics. The tuner features music by Henry Krieger and a book and lyrics by Tom Eyen.center_img You’re gonna love them, U.K.! Dreamgirls is set to finally make its London premiere and Tony winner Casey Nicholaw (Mormon, Aladdin) is in talks to direct the production, The Daily Mail reports. No word yet on theater, cast or dates.last_img read more

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Alexandria Wailes & Elizabeth Greene Begin Performances in Spring Awakening

first_imgSwitcheroo for the final weeks of Spring Awakening at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre. Alexandria Wailes and Elizabeth Greene will replace Marlee Matlin and Camryn Manheim in their roles, respectively, on January 10. Deaf West’s revival is scheduled to end its limited engagement on January 24.Michael Arden’s production previously played two different engagements in Los Angeles. The staging incorporates American Sign Language with the dialogue, as select characters are portrayed as deaf, with additional performers providing their voices.Spring Awakening, featuring music by Duncan Sheik and a book and lyrics by Steven Sater, is based on Frank Wedekind’s 1891 play by the same name. It follows a group of teenagers as they navigate through their sexual and intellectual blossoming, with varying degrees of support from adult figures in their lives. The original production won eight Tony Awards in 2007 including Best Musical.The cast also includes Krysta Rodriguez, Andy Mientus, Patrick Page, Russell Harvard as well as over a dozen newcomers, including Austin McKenzie as Melchior, Sandra Mae Frank as Wendla, Katie Boeck as the voice of Wendla, Daniel Durant as Moritz and Alex Boniello as the voice of Moritz. Spring Awakening View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 24, 2016 Related Showslast_img read more

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Kinky Boots, In the Heights, Mark Rylance Top Olivier Noms

first_img View Comments Matt Henry in ‘Kinky Boots'(Photo: Matt Crocket) Less than 12 hours after taking home an Oscar for Bridge of Spies, three-time Tony winner Mark Rylance earned an Olivier Award nomination for his leading performance in Farinelli and the King; the production is eyeing a New York bow later this year. Other Olivier nominees include Judi Dench and Kenneth Branagh for The Winter’s Tale, Benedict Cumberbatch for Hamlet, Imelda Staunton for Gypsy (the production leads the nominations with a whopping eight), Nicole Kidman for Photograph 51 and Janet McTeer for Les Liaisons Dangereuses. The Father, which will return to Broadway this spring with Frank Langella, is up for Best New Play, alongside Farinelli and the King, Hangmen and People, Places and Things. Two Tony-winning Best Musicals are up for Best New Musical for the London bow: In the Heights and Kinky Boots. Joining them in the category are Bend It Like Beckham and Mrs. Henderson Presents. The Olivier Awards ceremony will take place on April 3 at the Royal Opera House.Best New MusicalBend It Like Beckham In the Heights Kinky Boots Mrs. Henderson Presents Best Musical RevivalBugsy Malone Guys and Dolls Seven Brides For Seven Brothers GypsyBest New PlayFarinelli and the KingThe FatherHangmenPeople, Places and Things Best RevivalHamlet Les Liaisons Dangereuses Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom The Winter’s Tale Best New ComedyA Christmas Carol Hand To God at Vaudeville TheatreNell Gwynn at Apollo TheatrePeter Pan Goes Wrong at Apollo TheatreBest Actor in a MusicalIan Bartholomew for Mrs Henderson Presents Killian Donnelly for Kinky Boots David Haig for Guys and Dolls Matt Henry for Kinky Boots Jamie Parker for Guys And Dolls Best Actress in a MusicalTracie Bennett for Mrs Henderson Presents Natalie Dew for Bend It Like Beckham Laura Pitt-Pulford for Seven Brides For Seven Brothers Imelda Staunton for Gypsy Sophie Thompson for Guys and DollsBest Actor in a Supporting Role in a MusicalDavid Bedella for In the HeightsDan Burton for GypsyPeter Davison for GypsyGavin Spokes for Guys and DollsBest Actress in a Supporting Role in a MusicalPreeya Kalidas for Bend It Like BeckhamAmy Lennox for Kinky Boots Lara Pulver for Gypsy Emma Williams for Mrs. Henderson Presents at Noël Coward Best ActorKenneth Branagh for The Winter’s Tale Kenneth Cranham for The Father Benedict Cumberbatch for Hamlet Adrian Lester for Red Velvet Mark Rylance for Farinelli and the King Best ActressGemma Arterton for Nell Gwynn Denise Gough for People, Places and Things Nicole Kidman for Photograph 51 Janet McTeer for Les Liaisons Lia Williams for Oresteia Best Actor in a Supporting RoleMark Gatiss for Three Days in the CountryMichael Pennington for The Winter’s Tale Tom Sturridge for American Buffalo David Suchet for The Importance of Being Earnest Best Actress in a Supporting RoleJudi Dench for The Winter’s Tale Michele Dotrice for Nell Gwynn Melody Grove for Farinelli and the King Catherine Steadman for Oppenheimer Best DirectorRob Ashford and Kenneth Branagh for The Winter’s TaleMatthew Dunster for HangmenRobert Icke for Oresteia Jonathan Kent for Gypsy Best Theatre ChoreographerCarlos Acosta and Andrew Wright for Guys and DollsDrew McOnie for In the HeightsStephen Mear for GypsyJerry Mitchell for Kinky BootsBest Costume DesignGregg Barnes for Kinky BootsHugh Durrant for Nell GwynnJonathan Fensom for Farinelli and the KingKatrina Lindsay for Bend It Like BeckhamBest Set DesignHildegard Bechtler for OresteiaEs Devlin for Hamlet Jonathan Fensom for Farinelli and the King Anna Fleischle for Hangmen Best Lighting DesignNeil Austin for The Winter’s Tale Natasha Chivers for Oresteia James Farncombe for People, Places and Things Mark Henderson for Gypsy Best Sound DesignGeorge Dennis for The Homecoming Tom Gibbons for People, Places and Things Christopher Shutt for The Father Christopher Shutt for Hamlet Sound Award for Outstanding Achievement in MusicBend It Like Beckham—music by Howard Goodall, lyrics by Charles Hart, orchestrations by Howard Goodall and Kuljit BhamraFarinelli and the King—Claire van Kampen for musical arrangements, the musicians and Iestyn Davies and the singers who alternated the singing role of FarinelliIn The Heights—music and lyrics by Lin-Manuel MirandaKinky Boots—music and lyrics by Cyndi Lauper, music supervision, arrangements and orchestrations by Stephen OremusOutstanding Achievement in an Affiliate TheatreBarbarians at The ClarePhil Dunster for his role in Pink Mist Pat Kinevane and Fishamble for Silent Violence and Son Best Entertainment and FamilyAlice’s Adventures UndergroundDr. Seuss’ The LoraxI Want My Hat Back Peter Pan Showstopper! The Improvised Musical Best New Opera ProductionCavalleria Rusticana/Pagliacci The Force of Destiny Morgen Und Abend Outstanding Achievement in OperaEnglish National Opera Chorus and Orchestra for The Force of Destiny, Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk and The Queen of SpadesFelicity Palmer for The Queen of SpadesSir Antonio Pappano for his conducting of Cavalleria Rusticana/Pagliacci, Guillaume Telland Król Roger Tamara Wilson for The Force of DestinyBest New Dance ProductionHe Who Falls (Celui Qui Tombe) by Compagnie Yoann BourgeoisRomeo et Juliette by Les Ballets de Monte CarloWoolf Works by Wayne McGregorOutstanding Achievement in DanceAlessandra Ferri for her performances in Chéri and Woolf WorksJavier De Frutos for his choreography of Anatomy of a Passing CloudSasha Waltz for her choreography of Sacrelast_img read more

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Mia Michaels Enlisted for Rockettes’ Spectacular

first_imgMia Michaels(Photo by Bruce Glikas) Three-time Emmy winner Mia Michaels has been tapped to direct and choreograph the previously reported New York Spectacular Starring the Radio City Rockettes. Douglas Carter Beane will pen the show, which will run at Radio City Music Hall from June 15 through August 7.New York Spectacular Starring the Radio City Rockettes celebrates New York City in the summertime centered around the trip of a lifetime for two kids, who, while on a vacation in New York, are separated from their parents. The city magically comes to life to show them its many splendid wonders and helps to reunite their family in the end.Best known for her work on Fox’s So You Think You Can Dance, Michaels served as choreographer of “Welcome to New York,” the opening number of 2015’s New York Spring Spectacular and to Finding Neverland. Beane was Tony nominated for his work on Xanadu, Rodgers + Hammerstein’s Cinderella, Lysistrata Jones, Sister Act and The Little Dog Laughed.The production will feature lighting design by Alain Lortie and video design by Moment Factory. View Comments NY Spectacular Starring the Radio City Rockettescenter_img Show Closed This production ended its run on Aug. 7, 2016 Related Showslast_img read more

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Watch the NYC Gay Men’s Chorus Pay Tribute to Orlando

first_img View Comments In the wake of the attacks at Pulse Nightclub in Orlanda, Florida, the 70th annual Tony Awards were a beautiful reminder that theater can inspire and uplift. As James Corden said in his opening remarks, “Theater is a place where every race, creed, sexuality and gender is equal, is embraced, and is loved.” The New York City Gay Men’s Chorus embraced this sentiment as they performed an arrangement of “Light” from Tom Kitt and Brian Yorkey’s Next to Normal on Good Morning America. The group’s delivery of lyrics such as “The price of love is loss, but still we pay; we love anyway” are particularly resonant, and hopefully provide some much needed love and light. Take a look at the touching performance from Times Square below. The New York City Gay Men’s Choruslast_img read more

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Buy plants, cook stumps

first_imgUniversity of GeorgiaHost Walter Reeves shows how to buy the perfect plant at yournursery on “Gardening in Georgia” July 16 on Georgia PublicBroadcasting.”Gardening in Georgia” is produced by GPB and the University ofGeorgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Itairs each Saturday at 12:30 and 7 p.m.On this week’s show, Reeves visits with nursery owner StuartCofer to learn some tricks on selecting plants. Cofer shows howto examine plants in a nursery before buying them. The roots, hesays, are the keys to a healthy plant.Reeves shows a way to “cook” a stump, too, rather than digging orgrinding it down. His recipe involves drilling several deep holesinto the stump and then packing them with rich, woods dirt. Thenhe sprinkles some 10-10-10 on top, wets the mound and covers itwith clear plastic and a bit of pine straw. In a few months, thestump will be gone.Finally, Reeves looks closely at planthoppers, small insectsknown for their jumping ability. Planthoppers do little damage toplants. If you find them distracting from the beauty of yourplants, though, a blast from a water hose or a water pistol willremove them.last_img read more

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20 Stop that buzzing

first_imgVolume XXXIIINumber 1Page 20 Summertime brings out mosquitoes. The good news is that the risk of catching a mosquito-borne disease is pretty small. The bad news is that some mosquito-borne diseases, like encephalitis, can be devastating.Here are a few ecommendations will help you protect your family.• Minimize mosquito-breeding sites. Once a week, empty any container that holds water, including birdbaths, toys, flowerpot saucers, rain gauges and tire swings. Ask your neighbors to do the same. • Use mosquito dunks in water that cannot be emptied weekly, such as ornamental ponds. If you have fish in your ponds, you may not need to use any control method. Many fish eat mosquito eggs and larvae. If the larvae and pupae are abundant, you will see them.• Keep ground covers trimmed. Cut grape ivy and other low-growing plants around the house. This can greatly reduce the number of adult mosquitoes because they do not have an attractive place to rest.• Use insect repellents. Products containing DEET are the most effective against mosquitoes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently added two new active ingredients to their guidelines – picaridin and oil of lemon eucalyptus – as viable alternatives for people who object to using DEET.• Keep household screens in good repair.• Wear light-colored clothing. Mosquitoes are less attracted to light-colored clothing than dark. Certain types of mosquitoes prefer pregnant women. Some types of mosquitoes prefer human skin temperatures over 90 degrees. If you are attending an outdoor party, the key to keeping mosquitoes away is to be cool, wear light-colored clothes and chat with pregnant women who prefer dark Gothic styles. Be aware that mosquitoes can bite through T-shirts and other lightweight, tight-fitting clothing. I guess another option would be to attend outdoor summer parties wearing a heavy, loose coat. (You won’t be invited to many outdoor summer parties, but maybe you and the pregnant Gothic woman will hit it off.)Bug zappers do not kill many mosquitoes, but they kill a lot of beneficial insects. Bug zappers are useful against some insects but not mosquitoes. Ultrasonic devices are almost worthless for insect control. Don’t waste your money.Bats and purple martins don’t eat many mosquitoes. They prefer insects with a little more meat on them.The risks of an unmonitored pesticide application, like automated pesticide misters, almost always outweigh the benefits.Mosquito foggers can be used to greatly reduce mosquito populations in a small area for a few hours. Be sure to use a pesticide that is labeled for your use site and always follow the pesticide label directions.Mosquito traps usually catch a lot of mosquitoes, but they may not catch enough to keep mosquitoes from biting you. In a small, somewhat enclosed area, a trap may be useful. If mosquitoes are coming to your party from all over, you may not think a trap is worth the money. If I spend more than $200, one mosquito bite will probably seem like too many.For more information on protecting your family from mosquitoes, visit www.ent.uga.edu/pubs/mosquitos.htm. By Paul GuillebeauUniversity of Georgialast_img read more

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Water savings

first_imgBy April SorrowUniversity of GeorgiaMost Georgians are aware of the importance of conserving water, both inside and outside the home. In the landscape, a great way to save water is by planting during the cooler fall season, says a University of Georgia horticulturist. Spring = short establishment timeTrees and shrubs planted in the spring often don’t have time to get established before they’re exposed to the sizzling summer heat, said Gary Wade, a horticulturist with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.As temperatures rise, developing leaves, fruit and flowers demand more water and the root system may not be able to satisfy the demand, he said. If watering schedules are limited due to drought conditions, plants may die of thirst.When a plant’s top demands more supplies than the roots can provide, it starts abandoning branches or dropping leaves in a fight for survival. Fall is less stressful, more successful”Planting in the fall is much less stressful for the plant than springtime planting,” Wade said. Trees and shrubs grown in containers can be planted anytime, he said. But if you plant in the fall, as the weather cools down, the plant has a much better chance for survival. “Roots don’t go dormant,” he said. “They keep growing all winter. Even though the tops of deciduous plants go dormant for the winter and the tops of evergreen plants slow down, roots continue to grow. Since the tops demand little from the roots, the plant’s energy can be funneled to the roots for growth and establishment.” Fall-planted ornamentals also have a supply of carbohydrates and other food substances stored in their roots from the previous growing season. This stored energy helps roots establish while the rest of the plant rests. “When spring arrives, the plant will be able to pop with growth,” Wade said. Other advantages of fall planting are less water loss due to evaporation from the soil and from foliage as temperatures cool down. For these reasons, the plant requires less water while establishing. Follow these tipsPlanting in the fall is very similar to spring planting. “The only big difference is that you don’t want to fertilize when you plant in the fall,” he said. “Wait until next February.” Wade offers some basic fall planting tips: • Plant groupings of shrubs in beds thoroughly cultivated eight to 12 inches deep. • For a single shrub, dig a planting hole at least twice as wide and as deep as the plant’s root ball. • Make sure the planting site drains well. • When planting balled-and-burlapped plants, cut the cord or wire from around the stem and remove it. Then remove the top third or half of any burlap or fabric from around the root ball. • Place the plant at the same depth it was grown in the nursery. Make sure the top of the root ball is level with the soil surface. • Fill the hole with the soil you removed. Lightly pack it with your hands, water when it’s half filled and again when completely filled to remove air pockets around the roots. • Cover the planting surface with three to five inches of mulch, such as pine straw, pine bark or even fall leaves. This is always important, but even more critical during a drought. Mulch conserves water. • Water. Plants need water anytime it’s dry no matter which season. However, in the fall, they’re much more forgiving if you’re a day late watering them. Use care around trees and shrubsWhen adding new plants, minimize soil disturbance around existing trees and shrubs. When planting around established trees and shrubs, it’s best to plant in individual holes instead of cultivating an area and cutting roots of adjacent plants.“Most roots are within the top 12 inches of soil and the roots of established trees and shrubs can extend two to three times farther than their canopy spread,” Wade said. “When you dig and cut roots, you’re affecting the plant’s ability to absorb water and nutrients.”last_img read more

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Cold crops

first_imgIn recent weeks, bitter cold fronts have blasted the Deep South, wreaking havoc on home water pipes and icing roads. But for Georgia crops, the weather isn’t so bad, at least for now.Georgia’s famous peach crop, in fact, needs the cold weather right now, said Frank Funderburk, the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent in Peach County, the hub of the state’s peach industry. Peach trees need chill hours, or hours below 45 degrees Fahrenheit, to stay dormant during the winter months. This helps them bloom properly in the spring and produce fruit in the summer. Individual varieties require a different number of chill hours, ranging from 650 total hours to 950 total hours, he said. Right now, central Georgia has close to 400 chill hours logged already due to the cold weather, around 100 hours more than this time last year, Funderburk said. Growers like to get the chill hours their trees need by Feb. 15. As daytime temperatures warm, trees wake up and start to bloom. Any severe cold snaps in late winter or early spring burst buds, and that is bad, he said.Another famously sweet Georgia crop, the Vidalia onion, is now planted and growing in fields in southeast Georgia, the state’s official onion region. Even with temperatures dipping into the low teens like they did earlier this week, the onions are fine, said Reid Torrance, a UGA Extension agent in Tattnall County and an onion expert.“The only onions susceptible to injury at this stage are the earlier-planted varieties planted in November. They are getting big enough to have some damage, but mostly from being sandblasted from the high winds we received in the area,” Torrance said.He estimated that 25 percent of the total 13,000 or so acres of onions was planted in November. Even if they are damaged now, they will rebound when moderate weather returns to the region.Onions are winter-hardy, but cold weather can hurt them when ground temperatures shoot below freezing and reach the developing bulbs underground. This is rare but has happened in the past, Torrance said.Vegetable crops planted now like cabbage, collard greens and turnip greens tolerate cold weather, said Glenn Beard, UGA Extension agent in Colquitt County in south Georgia. This time of year, Colquitt farmers have roughly 3,500 acres of cabbage and 2,000 acres of greens planted.“We are on the tail-end of cabbage harvest, and we’ve gone without any major effect” by the weather, Beard said.Growers are harvesting the greens, too, which they try to sell to meet demand between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Eve, he said. The crop is shipping in good shape. Severe cold weather actually hit Colquitt County later this year than normal. The first plant-killing frost was Dec. 3, Beard said, three weeks later than normal.“Like I’ve told a few folks, it is winter, even in Georgia,” Beard said.last_img read more

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Katerva Award Nomination

first_imgAgriculture uses about 70 percent of the world’s fresh water supply, but a growing population’s increasing demand for drinking water means farmers need to know how to grow more with less water.A nationwide team of researchers — including scientists, engineers and economists from University of Maryland, University of Georgia, Carnegie Mellon University, Colorado State University, Cornell University, University of Maryland-Center for Environmental Science, Antir Software and Decagon Devices — is developing a new method to make agricultural water use much more efficient. Their work has attracted international attention, resulting in a nomination for a Katerva Award. Katerva promotes and recognizes collaborative approaches to solving global problems, and has recognized these researchers’ collaboration to develop hyper-efficient irrigation systems. The Smart Farm project was not chosen for the last round of the competition, but the researchers felt honored to have been one of just a few dozen projects nominated.The research and development team from UGA includes horticulture professors Marc van Iersel, Matthew Chappell, Paul Thomas and John Ruter; technician Sue Dove; and UGA doctoral students Mandy Bayer and Alem Peter. They have studied how to best use soil moisture sensors for irrigation control. On-farm testing at Evergreen Nursery in Statham, Ga., and McCorkle Nurseries in Dearing, Ga., has shown water savings of up to 83 percent, while saving labor and improving plant quality. “Being nominated for this award is a great honor and shows that our team has done outstanding and important work” says van Iersel. The team developed an economically viable system that uses remotely accessed soil and weather sensors to help farmers decide when and how much to irrigate their crops. The sensors relay information to a website that farmers can use to adjust their irrigation plans and schedules based on actual crop water needs, rather than timers or other less precise irrigation control methods. The group developed the precision irrigation concept with the help of a $5.1 million grant from the United States Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture Specialty Crops Research Initiative, along with a $5.1 million in matching contributions from the collaborating institutions, companies and horticulture industry. Seed grants from the Horticultural Research Institute, American Floral Endowment and the Fred C. Gloeckner Foundation helped pay for much of the early work. Their system is currently being tested in eight greenhouse and nursery operations in Maryland, Ohio, Tennessee and Georgia. While the initial trials are on a small scale, the system is designed to be scalable, so that growers can easily expand it. “By making the system scalable, growers can try it out in a small area,” said John Lea-Cox, a nursery industry research and Extension specialist with the University of Maryland “If they decide they like it, it will be easy to implement it on a much larger scale.” Decagon Devices partnered with the Smart Farm project to develop commercially available hardware and software systems to help the horticulture industry implement this new irrigation approach. According to the non-profit, “Katerva isn’t looking for ideas that will improve the world in small increments. We are looking for paradigm-busting ideas. Our Award winners don’t simply move the needle when it comes to efficiency, lifestyle or consumption; they change the game entirely.” Katerva was founded as a British non-profit in 2010 to promote and recognize innovative ideas for solving global environmental and humanitarian issues. The international news organization Reuters has called the Katerva Awards “the Nobel Prizes of sustainability.” Those looking for more information about the Smart Farm project can visit www.smart-farms.net. For more information about the Katerva Awards, visit www.katerva.org.last_img read more

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