The arts sector appears to be making gradual progr

first_imgThe arts sector appears to be making gradual progress on increasing the proportion of disabled people in its workforce, although many leading companies have admitted employing no disabled staff at all, a new report by the Arts Council has revealed.The percentage of disabled people working for the larger organisations receiving Arts Council England (ACE) funding – its national portfolio organisations (NPOs) – doubled from just two per cent in 2014-15 to four per cent in 2015-16.The proportion of disabled people on NPO boards has also risen sharply, from 3.2 per cent to seven per cent. ACE says the proportion of disabled people in the overall working-age population is about 19 per cent.There has also been a significant increase in the number of disabled-led NPOs, increasing from five to 19 in just one year – which may explain some of the employment increase – while ACE said that three per cent of all of its strategic funds were awarded to disability-led organisations, compared to just two per cent in 2014-15.But there are still question-marks over the rate of progress.The ACE report reveals that some major arts organisations that receive ACE funding – and employ more than 50 members of staff – appear to have no disabled employees at all.Although those figures refer to 2014-15, while the rest of the report covers 2015-16, the arts organisations admitting that they employ no disabled people at all include the BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, the English National Opera, the London Symphony Orchestra, The Roundhouse, the University of Warwick, and Bristol Old Vic.An ACE spokeswoman warned that it would be “using the data to inform the decisions we take” on future funding from 2018.There are also concerns that, while the number of performances made accessible to audience members who are deaf or blind rose from 3,760 to 4,613, the number of accessible exhibition days plunged from 8,054 to 1,066 days, while the number of accessible film screenings fell from 4,675 to 4,019.ACE said it was “looking into” the reasons for these falls.But the figures in the Equality, Diversity And The Creative Case 2015-16 report seem to show that ACE’s Creative Case for Diversity programme is now making some progress, two years after it was launched in December 2014.This year, it invested £11.8 million in diversity, an increase of more than 40 per cent on the amount ACE originally intended to spend.This includes £5.3 million on Elevate, which aims to develop diverse-led organisations, a sum that was “uplifted” through National Lottery funding “due to the strength of applications received”; funding to help address the lack of diversity in arts leadership, through the Change Makers programme (pictured); and support for the development and commissioning of new work by deaf and disabled artists, through Unlimited, which was originally launched as part of the London 2012 Cultural Olympiad.An ACE spokeswoman said: “We know that there is more to be done in terms of the leadership within the sector, the representation of disabled people across our workforce and the barriers around socio-economic participation.“We are committed to addressing these issues.”From 2018, those NPOs receiving more than £1 million a year “will be required to ensure their leadership and workforce reflects the diversity of their local area”, while ACE will have “some involvement in senior management and board appointments”.Its chief executive, Darren Henley, told the report’s launch event in Manchester: “Disabled representation within the arts and culture workforce now stands at four per cent.“We all have to do better – and I include the Arts Council in that challenge.”Henley said that research commissioned by ACE into why this figure was so low found that disabled people still faced “significant barriers to employment”, particularly as a result of reform of the government’s Access to Work scheme.He said: “We’ve expressed our concerns to government about recent changes and their impact on the ability of disabled artists to develop their careers.“We’re watching what happens next and will continue to make representations.”He also said that black and minority ethnic and disabled people were still under-represented in arts audiences,He said that “work still needs to be done for disabled people”, and he added: “We are seeing progress in diversity… but we need to keep pushing on.”Jane Cordell, chair of the disability and Deaf arts organisation DaDaFest, told the event that it was vital that the boards running arts organisations were diverse because they “challenge more, they disrupt”.She said: “If we don’t have those who have experiences beyond the norm, our strategies and plans are at risk of being normal and a vicious circle of unseen exclusion will persist.”Meanwhile, the user-led access-to-live-music charity Attitude is Everything has announced the six winners of its inaugural Outstanding Attitude Awards.The awards have been presented to venues and festivals “at the forefront of creative access provision” for Deaf and disabled audiences at live music events. The three winning venues were The Albany, in London, for providing video-based travel information on its website; Colston Hall, in Bristol, for a conference and a series of performances that “put accessible music-making centre-stage”; and the Motorpoint Arena in Nottingham, for offering British Sign Language (BSL) interpretation at all of its events.The winning festivals were Just So, in Cheshire, for its inclusive programming; Nozstock, in Herefordshire, for its online access information; and Reading, for its user-led BSL interpretation service.last_img read more

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Scottish criminal justice agencies have rejected p

first_imgScottish criminal justice agencies have rejected pleas to investigate the failure of two ministers to improve the safety of the government’s “fitness for work” test, despite evidence that their actions caused the deaths of at least three benefit claimants.Police Scotland was asked in March to investigate allegations of “wilful neglect of duty” by former Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) ministers Iain Duncan Smith and Chris Grayling.A dossier containing details of the deaths of three benefit claimants with experience of mental distress was passed to Police Scotland by the Scottish grassroots campaign network Black Triangle.The three claimants – Paul Donnachie, David Barr, and a woman known only as Ms D E – took their own lives in 2015, 2013 and 2011 as a result of grave flaws in the work capability assessment (WCA).These flaws mirrored those uncovered by a coroner in January 2010, following the suicide of Stephen Carré, and passed to DWP in a prevention of future deaths report just a few weeks before Duncan Smith (pictured at this year’s Tory conference) and Grayling took up their new posts following the May 2010 general election.Black Triangle approached Police Scotland with the dossier in March 2016 because it believed there was clear evidence that the two ministers neglected their duty as public servants in refusing to bring in the changes called for by the coroner, so causing other deaths, including those of Paul Donnachie, David Barr and Ms D E.Black Triangle said its dossier concluded that, “were it not for the alleged criminal omissions by the two ministers, these and countless other deaths could have been and could yet be avoided”.But nine months after Black Triangle passed the dossier to Police Scotland, the force appears to have done little to investigate the allegations, other than consulting with the Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal (COPF), the Scottish equivalent of the Crown Prosecution Service.This week, Edinburgh police confirmed that it would be taking no further action on the David Barr case, while COPF said that it had also decided that no further action should be taken on the Paul Donnachie case.Police Scotland said that COPF had already decided that there was no link between DWP’s decision to find David Barr fit for work – following a 35-minute assessment by a physiotherapist – and his decision to take his own life a month after being told by DWP he was not eligible for employment and support allowance (ESA).Maureen Barr, David’s mother, said this week that she was “disappointed” at the COPF decision, but “definitely” still wanted Duncan Smith and Grayling to face justice.John McArdle, co-founder of Black Triangle, said: “We have been given no detailed information on what legal reasoning has been applied to any of the above matters and there seems to be complete silence on the compelling evidence set out in the case of Ms D E.“In all the circumstances, this conduct is totally unacceptable and constitutes an insult not only to the families of the deceased but to every disabled and vulnerable Scot and their families who look to Police Scotland and the COPFS to keep them safe. “This is not over. We are consulting with our legal advisers and will be taking this all the way. “For disabled people in Scotland and equally throughout the UK these are literally matters of life and death and Black Triangle campaign will not let them down, whether or not the state chooses to.“We would like to appeal to all of them to continue to support our campaign for justice and to never give in to despair in spite of any and all setbacks.”A COPF spokesman said: “The circumstances surrounding the deaths of Mr Donnachie and Mr Barr have been fully investigated.“The Procurator Fiscal and Crown Counsel have respectively concluded that no further investigation is required and that no further action should be taken.“The nearest relatives have been informed of this decision and have been offered an opportunity to discuss it further with the Procurator Fiscal.”Police Scotland has previously said it would only look at the Ms D E case if Black Triangle or Disability News Service were able to pass on her personal details.But those details have never been made public, as her death was the subject of a report by the Mental Welfare Commission for Scotland (MWCS), which treated her case anonymously and concluded that she killed herself after being told she was not eligible for ESA.The report linked her death to DWP’s failure to obtain medical evidence about her mental health from the professionals who had treated her, just as the coroner had done in the case of Stephen Carré.This week, MWCS declined to comment when asked if Police Scotland had requested Ms D E’s details, stating that it was “for Police Scotland to respond to your request related to any investigation”.Police Scotland and COPF had both refused by 11am today (Thursday) to say whether they had attempted to contact MWCS since receiving the Black Triangle dossier in March.McArdle said the Police Scotland and COPFS responses “beggar belief” and that an email to him from MWCS earlier this year “clearly shows that the ball was in Police Scotland’s court to contact the chief executive of MWCS”.He said: “In an open and democratic society operating under the constitutional principle of the ‘rule of law’, we are entitled to require the full facts and complete transparency from our police service and we will not desist until the full facts are revealed.”last_img read more

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Mixed feelings in SF Mission Chinese community about Ed Lees legacy

first_img Tags: Business • ed lee Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0% But, while Andy felt it was good to have an Asian mayor, he at times felt neglected by Lee as a small business owner in a rapidly changing neighborhood like the Mission. In 2013, the Mission’s Asian population was 12 percent.“He did a lot for the Chinese community, but the Mission changed a lot, and we’ve been recently losing a lot of business,” he said. “He’s a good guy, but sometimes he didn’t do enough to protect small Chinese businesses.”Lai Lee Choy, 84, said through an interpreter that she thought Lee was far too young to die and still had a strong political future ahead of him. Lee was the city’s first Asian American mayor. “He was also the face that represented the Asian American community,” she said, sitting in the foyer of the Bethany Center. “It’s good to have a Chinese mayor, because he knows the culture of the Chinese community, and there’s a bridge, and he can represent us.” Jackie Tan, 23, who works at the Bethany Center, said he met Lee twice during charity and volunteering events. “He seemed like a nice guy,” Tan said. Tan, who speaks Cantonese, said with Lee it was “definitely easier for Chinese people to speak up for what they wanted to change in San Francisco.” But, like Andy at Sun Fat Seafood, some business owners felt that the first Chinese mayor had not done enough. Lee, a manager at Casa Thai Market on 16th and Mission streets, said that, although Mayor Ed Lee was great for the economy and “everyone loved him” for it, some issues could have used more of his attention. “Can’t say much about the homeless,” he said, pointing around the 16th Street BART Plaza. Tsang, the owner of the 19th and Mission market, agreed. “Maybe he could have done the homeless situation better,” she said. Others, like Annie Luo, who runs a Chinese restaurant on Mission Street, said she and many in Chinese community felt abandoned by Lee as he supported retail cannabis in more family-oriented neighborhoods like the Sunset. “Didn’t he know anything about Chinese history?” she said, referring to the drug stigma Chinese people sometimes hold because of China’s history with the opium trade. Luo said that she and around 100 Asian-American residents recently demonstrated twice in front of Lee’s house before he signed the city’s retail cannabis law on Dec. 6. “He didn’t even open the door,” she said. “We were so disappointed — we wanted to sit down and talk, and he didn’t want to talk at all.” But she also said the dissatisfaction in the community had been building “day by day, week by week, year by year,” largely because, in the face of mounting unaffordability in the city, Lee remained partitioned off from their concerns. “Even though we pushed his doorbell, and even at his office, he didn’t open up at all,” she said. “He didn’t listen to you.” Members of the Mission District Chinese community reacted with varying degrees of surprise, sadness and bitterness to the sudden death of Mayor Ed Lee, who collapsed from an apparent heart attack on Monday at around 10:30 p.m. while shopping at the Safeway near his home in Glen Park. “I was so shocked this morning,” Tina Tsang, who owns City Discount Meat & Grocery at 19th and Mission street, said on Tuesday. “I can’t believe it happened.” Tsang said she thought Lee’s reign had an overall positive effect on the city’s economy — and, generally speaking, she thought he pulled for small businesses like hers. Andy, a co-owner of Sun Fat Seafood on Mission Street, was surprised this morning when he heard the news. “He’s one of the most famous Chinese people I know,” he said. center_img 0%last_img read more

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Distillations Winging it at Teeth

first_img Email Address “Luke” was sitting on a bench on the third and highest level of Teeth’s bleacher-style back patio, drinking lager from a can. “Did I tell you I just got dumped by my girlfriend?” he asked me. “I hadn’t actually known you were seeing anybody,” I said. “This is all news to me.”He nodded. “She was exceptionally normal. Incredibly so. We were together six months, and it was a perfectly adequate relationship, and it was never going to be anything more than a perfectly adequate relationship. But it still sucks getting dumped.”“Yeah.” He tilted his head. “What do you mean?”Ah, right, he’s only been here five years. Somehow, at 12 years a San Franciscan, I’ve become a kind of elder statesman for the newest batch. “Elder statesman” status accrues quickly in a city of transients. “Bruce Brugmann was the founder and publisher of the San Francisco Bay Guardian, which for decades railed against gentrification and corporate media ownership, and his paper acted as the low-budget Spanish Inquisition of progressivism, condemning everyone — including me — who didn’t live up to their standards. But then, when Brugmann wanted to retire, he sold the Bay Guardian to – guess what? — an out of-town-media conglomerate. And he sold the building, which he’d bought explicitly to give the Bay Guardian a home where it wouldn’t have to worry about the real estate market, to high-end developers. In one moment he did everything he and his paper had spent 40 years railing against other people for doing. And because he sold out, the Bay Guardian eventually got shuttered and San Francisco doesn’t have a progressive paper of record anymore, but it does have more offices and condos for the out-of-town techies Brugmann accused other people of welcoming. So. That’s a Bruce Brugmann moment.”Luke nodded. “So it’s like that?”I scowled. “It’s a little more complicated than that. The lines of betrayal aren’t so clear. And it depends on what he does next, too, I suppose. But yeah, I think in a lot of ways, he Brugmanned it.”Luke let out a breath and finished his drink. “You know, the way the world keeps going, the people who say we’re all living in some kind of simulation sound more convincing every day. It’s been that way since 2015, but really, all you have to do is check to see what Donald Trump or Elon Musk are tweeting about to think, ‘this can’t be real.’”I laughed, for the first time that night. “It does seem a lot like somebody keeps switching up the difficulty level, and creating really stupid challenges.”“What timeline IS THIS?” he asked.I laughed again, but didn’t have an answer. The patio lights were on. Night had come. “I’m a little surprised you’ve never written about this place before,” he said.The other people at the picnic table had left, and two new groups came down, bearing giant platters of wings. I chuckled. “It’s always too fucking crowded. Every time I walk in, see the crowd, say ‘nope,’ and go someplace else.” I love sports bars, but not on game day. Masses of people dilute a bar, make it less like itself and more like any other spot with masses of people. Just like an anti-gentrification crusader who sells his newspaper office to developers is, ultimately, more like every other guy who sells a building to developers. No matter what decorations it throws up, Teeth’s identity is “masses of people” — and it does it extremely well. “Yeah, I can see that,” Luke said. “I need to get back to the ocean soon, go surfing. That’s the only thing that reliably takes me out of my head.”Looking around, I thought that we might have been the only people there who were still in our heads. A few minutes later, we got up and walked back out into the world. Teeth is a weird combination of a sports bar and a fetish bar. I think it’s a bar that knows it’s exceptionally normal, especially for San Francisco, but that puts up a fight about it, lightly decorating with mannequins in leather that could be risqué if squinted at, in the dark, from Nebraska. I do appreciate the effort, but when you’ve got a massive back patio, TVs, cheap wings (especially on Wednesdays), and a drink menu that has craft cocktails but leans on pitchers and shot and beer combos … well … come on … nobody’s there for a vaguely dark and foreboding atmosphere. This is a sports bar for people who don’t want to admit that they want a sports bar. And hey, there’s nothing wrong with a good sports bar. A good sports bar is a fine thing. But the pretending? The pretending hurts.Luke is a hired gun in San Francisco’s blossoming “immersive theater” scene. He runs his own events, always simple, always free, but he’s better known within that community as a guy you want working on your shows. Helping develop concepts, figuring out logistics, producing live moments of other people’s lives from backstage. I have a moment like that, for a stranger, that needs producing. I asked for Luke’s help and he agreed. So we sat outside at a picnic table surrounded by the kind of diverse crowd that only 25-cent wings can bring, mapping the contours of a stranger’s life in a little notebook as servers walked around the patio carrying truly massive platters of wings, shouting numbers out in a desperate attempt to find the people who made the order. It was unusually crisp, darkness was starting to fall; it felt, surprisingly, like an autumn night in New England. We finished our work quickly. Luke closed his notebook, and gave me a curious look. Asked me if the rumors were true that a certain San Francisco showman I am close to had quietly shuttered his Mission venue and sold the building off to developers. Yeah, I told him. It’s true. “Well,” he sighed. “Another one bites the dust. How do you feel about that?”“I told him it’s his Bruce Brugmann moment.” Subscribe to Mission Local’s daily newsletterlast_img read more

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NATHAN Brown and Mark Flanagan are interviewed on

first_imgNATHAN Brown and Mark Flanagan are interviewed on the latest edition of the In Touch Podcast.To download click here or search for St Helens RFC on iTunes.The Podcast, in partnership with 105.9 Citytalk, includes reaction from the recent win at Widnes and a feature on our club chaplain.Remember if you want a question answering on the Podcast drop us a line @saints1890 on twitter or email podcast@saintsrlfc.comlast_img

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TODAY marks 100 days to go to the kickoff of Rugb

first_imgTODAY marks 100 days to go to the kick-off of Rugby League World Cup 2013 and organisers are predicting a hectic final phase, with even stronger ticket sales as interest continues to build in both hemispheres.Set against the backdrop of a fascinating summer with the England cricket team squaring up to Australia in The Ashes and the British & Irish Lions having such a successful tour down under, the opening day of the tournament will provide another chance for the two old rivals to go toe to toe.In 100 days, on October 26, hosts England play Australia, in the opening game. A cauldron-like atmosphere is guaranteed under the closed roof of the Millennium Stadium, one of the best places to watch live sport in the world.The game will follow the official Opening Ceremony which is billed as ‘the greatest show that Rugby League has ever seen’. Following that, co-hosts Wales will take on a much-fancied Italian side.Around 40 per cent of the tournament’s ticket target has already been achieved, which organisers are taking as a huge boost as they look forward to welcoming all 14 teams in October.RLWC2013 Tournament General Manager, Sally Bolton said: “The 100 days to go milestone brings us another significant step closer to delivering the best Rugby League World Cup the game has ever seen.“We kick off at the Millennium Stadium with arguably the best fixture in international Rugby League. England against Australia always brings out the passion of both sets of fans and in the Millennium Stadium; under the closed roof, the atmosphere will be electric.“With 40 per cent of our tickets gone, we know there is huge interest in both that fantastic opener and the tournament as a whole. Data shows that a significant number of our sales are to new fans, which is terrific.”To mark the 100 day milestone RLWC2013 has also enlisted the help of Rugby League players, personalities and celebrity fans to help hide 100 specially-branded RLWC2013 balls.Those hiding the balls will then use clues about where their ball is hidden including the hashtag #findourballs. Lucky finders will win tickets to their local RLWC2013 match.last_img read more

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SAINTS have a superb record against the Red Devils

first_imgSAINTS have a superb record against the Red Devils in St Helens.Salford are seeking their first away win against St Helens for over 35 years – and their first in the summer era.They have previously lost all 15 matches at Knowsley Road since 1997, one game at Widnes’ Stobart Stadium in 2011 and three at Langtree Park.Saints last defeat on home soil was on January 12 1980 (18-17) and they have won 30 consecutive home meetings between the sides since then.2015 Meeting:Salford 6, St Helens 52 (SLR2, 12/2/15)Super League Summary:St Helens won 32Salford won 4Highs and Lows:St Helens highest score: 66-16 (H, 2001) (Widest margin: 58-4, A, 2000)Salford highest score: 42-34 (H, 2010) (Widest margin: 39-26, H, 1997)Career Milestones:Jon Wilkin needs two tries to reach a career century of touchdowns.His total of 98 has been scored as follows: 8 for Hull KR (2000-2002), 89 for St Helens (2003-2015) and 1 for England (2004-2005, 2008-2009 & 2011-2012). Wilkin also made 6 non-scoring appearances for Great Britain (2006-2007).Consecutive Appearances:Mose Masoe has the longest run of consecutive appearances amongst Super League players, with 47.He made his Saints debut as a substitute in a 38-18 win against Hull KR at Langtree Park on March 7 2014 and has been an ever-present in the side since then.1 Mose Masoe (St Helens) 472 Danny Washbrook (Wakefield Trinity Wildcats) 393 Elliott Whitehead (Catalans Dragons) 354 Jermaine McGillvary (Huddersfield Giants) 325 = Paul Aiton (Leeds Rhinos), Chris Hill (Warrington Wolves) 31First Utility Super League Leading Scorers:Tries:1 Joe Burgess (Wigan Warriors) 162 = Tom Lineham (Hull FC), Dominic Manfredi (Wigan Warriors) 124 = Zeb Taia (Catalans Dragons), Tommy Makinson (St Helens), Jordan Turner (St Helens), Kevin Brown (Widnes Vikings) 118 = Kieran Dixon (Hull Kingston Rovers), Ken Sio (Hull Kingston Rovers), Kallum Watkins (Leeds Rhinos) 10Goals:1 Scott Dureau (Catalans Dragons) 522 Danny Brough (Huddersfield Giants) 503 = Josh Mantellato (Hull Kingston Rovers), Matty Smith (Wigan Warriors) 485 Kevin Sinfield (Leeds Rhinos) 476 Luke Gale (Castleford Tigers) 467 Stefan Ratchford (Warrington Wolves) 378 = Jack Owens (Widnes Vikings), Marc Sneyd (Hull FC) 3210 Josh Griffin (Salford Red Devils) 29Goals Percentage:1 Kevin Sinfield (Leeds Rhinos) 87.03 (47/54)2 Danny Tickle (Widnes Vikings) 84.61 (11/13)3 Scott Dureau (Catalans Dragons) 80.00 (52/65)4 Tommy Makinson (St Helens) 76.47 (13/17)5 Danny Brough (Huddersfield Giants) 75.75 (50/66)6 Luke Gale (Castleford Tigers) 74.19 (46/62)7 Marc Sneyd (Hull FC) 72.72 (32/44)8 Josh Griffin (Salford Red Devils) 72.50 (29/40)9 Craig Hall (Wakefield Trinity Wildcats) 72.22 (26/36)10 Gareth O’Brien (Warrington Wolves) 71.42 (10/14)Points:1 Josh Mantellato (Hull Kingston Rovers) 1322 Luke Gale (Castleford Tigers) 1133 = Danny Brough (Huddersfield Giants), Scott Dureau (Catalans Dragons), Matty Smith (Wigan Warriors) 1106 Kevin Sinfield (Leeds Rhinos) 1087 Stefan Ratchford (Warrington Wolves) 948 Jack Owens (Widnes Vikings) 849 Josh Griffin (Salford Red Devils) 7810 Marc Sneyd (Hull FC) 75last_img read more

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All participants both old and new will be most wel

first_imgAll participants both old and new will be most welcome – with first team squad member Louie McCarthy-Scarsbrook on hand to say hello to the children.Activities will resume in The Community Youth Zone, Totally Wicked Stadium on Tuesday January 9 from 4.30pm-5.30pm.SCDF would like to take this opportunity to wish all from the group a Happy Christmas and a great New Year!last_img

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Yum Solar eclipse themed Duck Donuts assortment

first_img The half dozen, dozen or bucket assortment will be available Aug. 19-21 to help celebrate the historic event. (Photo: Duck Donuts) WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — Duck Donuts announced a unique donut assortment inspired by the highly anticipated solar eclipse on Monday.Chocolate icing with oreos and hot fudge drizzle and vanilla icing with powdered sugar are just a few of the several options available.- Advertisement – last_img

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Legislature could override Gov Coopers veto

first_imgWILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — The legislature could override a bill vetoed by the governor come October. On Thursday, Gov. Roy Cooper vetoed House Bill 56, amending various environmental laws and including some measures to address GenX.Since the governor’s veto, Senator Michael Lee says they have not had a meeting to talk about it but he has seen statements from various lawmakers about a possible override.- Advertisement – Lee sent WWAY the following statement:“I am hopeful the House will override the Governor’s veto and send it to the Senate so that we can address the GenX issues immediately. We can then work with the Administration and others on the long term solution to address water quality concerns and to hopefully prevent this from ever happening again.”A possible vote will not happen until the House is back in session October 4th.last_img read more

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