Of all the homes buyers could choose, this is the type Queenslanders want the most

first_imgPopular suburbs for “ideal house’’ searches. Supplied: realestate.com.auREA Group chief economist Nerida Conisbee said the figures showed that many people still aspired to the dream of owning a quarter acre block.She said with rising house prices they were prepared to live in suburbs further out to secure what they wanted.“There’s a perception that everyone wants to live in the city, but the reality is people are willing to make trade-offs to find their perfect home,’’ she said.Ms Conisbee said most buyers had only a set amount they could afford.“The fact that it’s getting more expensive to live in inner urban areas means more people are willing to compromise on location for a bigger block of land and a bigger house.’’Ms Conisbee said those who were looking at inner city areas needed to accept that there would be higher prices, particularly for houses. Upper Coomera is popular with house hunters. This home at30 Wolseley Way is listed for $520,000 – $560,000. Picture: realestate.com.auMore from newsFor under $10m you can buy a luxurious home with a two-lane bowling alley5 Apr 2017Military and railway history come together on bush block24 Apr 2019Realestate.com.au analysed the traffic on about 102,000 “highly engaged’’ housing listings to see what people were looking for.The Queensland suburb potential buyers most searched for this type of home was Buderim on the Sunshine Coast.But with a median house price of $615,000 for Buderim, buyers may be left having to fork out a little more than they originally hoped.Other popular suburbs in Queensland where buyers searched for their “ideal house” criteria where Upper Coomera, North Lakes and Forest Lake. Buderim was the Queensland suburb where many buyers searched for their ideal house. Is is this one? This four-bedroom home at2 Montage Court is listed for $670,000. Picture: realestate.com.auOF all the different types of homes buyers could choose from, if you offering one like this for sale, you are sure to find a buyer.New research has revealed Queensland’s ideal house and it appears our tastes are pretty simple.The most searched for type of house according to realestate.com.au is a four-bedroom house with a two-car garage, two bathrooms and 708sq m of land.Searchers are generally looking at a median house price of $520,000 to buy this.That’s a big come down in spend from April last year, when searchers were looking to spend a median of $650,000 and were after the same house on a smaller 665sq m block.last_img read more

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Catholic view of marriage leads to suspension – at Catholic school!

first_imgFamily Research Council 19 March 2015Is it possible to be too Catholic to teach at Catholic school? New Jersey’s Immaculata High School thinks so. In a story that would be shocking even for a public school, Immaculata suspended a long-time teacher for defending what its own church espouses about marriage! Patricia Jannuzzi didn’t make the comments in class — or even during school time. But when she used her personal Facebook to express her personal views, the attack quickly turned personal too.Like Dr. Ben Carson (and science!), Patricia believes homosexual behavior is a choice. So when the popular Republican came under fire for saying as much, Jannuzzi backed him up in a post. “They (advocates of same-sex marriage),” she wrote, “want to reengineer western civ into a slow extinction. We need healthy families with a mother and a father for the sake of the children and humanity!” Furious that Dan Savage lived up to his name with another disgusting tweet, Patricia shared an article about his rant (so vile we can’t repeat it) against Carson.Somehow, the openly gay nephew of actress Susan Sarandon (who attended Immaculate) saw her post and wrote a letter to the school. Before long, his outrage was picked up by his famous aunt and tweeted all across the Internet. Almost immediately, the teacher was hauled into the office and ordered to disable her Facebook page, because her views were “completely inconsistent with our policy and position as a Catholic Christian community.”That’s interesting, since Jannuzzi’s beliefs are the same as Pope Francis’s himself! “The family,” he has said, “based on the marriage of a man and a woman . . . is not a simple social convention, but rather the fundamental cell of every society.” If she could be fired for agreeing with the Pope at a Catholic school, then these are scary times indeed. To placate Hollywood, Immaculata put Patricia on administrative leave, explaining that “We will do everything we can in this trying time to make clear that the philosophy of Immaculata High School is one of inclusion rooted in the teachings of Jesus Christ.”Unfortunately for Principal Jean Kline — and anyone under the same illusion — Jesus’s teachings were anything but inclusive. He didn’t say, “I am one way, one truth, one life.” He said, “I am the way, the truth, the life.” No one, he insisted, comes to the Father, but by me. That “truth,” revealed in Scripture, teaches that sexuality belongs in the confines of man-woman marriage.http://www.frc.org/updatearticle/20150319/nj-school-chalklast_img read more

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Strong families, prosperous states: Do healthy families affect the wealth of states?

first_imgAmerican Enterprise Institute 19 October 2015Poverty Studies, Society and CultureEconomics has its roots in the Greek word oikonomia, which means the “management of the household.” Yet economists across the ideological spectrum have paid little attention to the links between household family structure and the macroeconomic outcomes of nations, states, and societies. This is a major oversight because, as this report shows, shifts in marriage and family structure are important factors in states’ economic performance, including their economic growth, economic mobility, child poverty, and median family income.Strong Families, Prosperous States documents four key sets of facts about the links between families and the economic welfare of states across the country:•Higher levels of marriage, and especially higher levels of married-parent families, are strongly associated with more economic growth, more economic mobility, less child poverty, and higher median family income at the state level in the United States. When we compare states in the top quintile of married-parent families with those in the bottom quintile, we find that being in the top quintile is associated with a $1,451 higher per capita GDP, 10.5 percent greater upward income mobility for children from lower-income families, a 13.2 percent decline in the child poverty rate, and a $3,654 higher median family income. These estimates are based on models that control for a range of factors—from the educational and racial composition of a state to its tax policies and spending on education, and to unchanging characteristics of states—that might otherwise confound the family-economy link at the state level.•The share of parents in a state who are married is one of the top predictors of the economic outcomes studied in this report. In fact, this family factor is generally a stronger predictor of economic mobility, child poverty, and median family income in the American states than are the educational, racial, and age compositions of the states.•The state-level link between marriage and economic growth is stronger for younger adults (ages 25–35) than for older adults (36–59). This suggests that marriage plays a particularly important role in fostering a positive labor market orientation among young men.•Violent crime is much less common in states with larger shares of families headed by married parents, even after controlling for a range of socio-demographic factors at the state level. For instance, the violent crime rate (violent crimes per 100,000 people) sits at 343 on average for states in the top quintile of married parenthood, whereas those in the bottom quintile average a rate of 563. This is noteworthy because high crime rates lower the quality of life and real living standards and are associated with lower levels of economic growth and mobility.Given the importance of strong families for the economy, we propose four policy ideas to strengthen the economic and cultural foundations of marriage and family life in states across the country:http://www.aei.org/publication/strong-families-prosperous-states/last_img read more

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Men’s Soccer Opens 2016 MVC Tournament Against Bradley

first_imgStory Links Live Stats Drake is the No. 6 seed for the tournament after finishing the regular season 2-5-1 in MVC play and 5-11-1 overall. Bradley is No. 7 seed after going 0-7-1 in MVC games and 2-14-3 overall. The Bulldogs are the defending MVC Tournament champions as they won three matches last year in Edwardsville, Ill. including a 1-0 win over host, SIUE, in the title game, to claim their second-ever MVC tournament title. Drake and Bradley are longtime rivals as the Bulldogs and Braves have played 40 matches all-time. Drake holds a 20-17-3 advantage in the series after winning both of the regular season matches between the teams. The Bulldogs held on for a 1-0 victory over the Braves on Oct. 11 at home on a late goal from redshirt Ben LeMay (Hugo, Minn.). On Oct. 26 in Peoria, Ill., Drake claimed a 2-1 win on a golden goal by sophomore Nic Jaimes (Olathe, Kan.) late in the second overtime session. Drake and Bradley met in the tournament semifinals a year ago as the Bulldogs earned a 2-0 win over the Braves. Redshirt senior goalkeeper Darrin MacLeod (Waterloo, Ontario) and redshirt senior James Grunert (Muskego, Wis.) are the leaders of the Bulldogs’ back line. This season MacLeod became the program’s all-time leader in nearly every goalkeeper statistical category. His name is in the top spot for games, minutes, saves, shutouts and wins. Grunert is the most experienced defender for the Bulldogs with 61 career appearances. He missed four matches this season due to injury, but has played nearly every minute in the nine matches since his return.A win over Bradley sets up a matchup with Evansville. The Purple Aces rallied for a 4-3 win in the regular season meeting between the teams on Oct. 22 in Des Moines. Drake leads the all-time series 15-12-2. Print Friendly Version The Valley On ESPN3 SPRINGFIELD, Mo. – The Drake University men’s soccer team and Bradley University start the 2016 Missouri Valley Conference Tournament in the opening round game on Tuesday at 12 p.m. at Betty and Bobby Allison South Stadium on the campus of Missouri State University. This will be the 21st MVC tournament appearance in program history for Drake, who has an 11-16-2 record at the tournament with 13 semifinal appearances and two titles (2009, 2015). The winner of Tuesday’s match will advance to take on No. 3 Evansville in the quarterfinals on Wednesday afternoon at 3 p.m. Every match of the MVC Tournament will be shown live on The Valley On ESPN3 with Sean Wheelock (play-by-play) and Ty Keough (analyst) on the call. Senior forward James Wypych (Wellington, New Zealand) leads the offensive attack for the Bulldogs this season. Wypych ranks third in the league with eight goals and is tied for fifth in assists with five. Junior Steven Enna (Overland Park, Kan.) is second on the team with five goals. LeMay and Jaimes are next with two goals each. In the midfield, senior Mueng Sunday (Coralville, Iowa), is the field general of the team. Sunday, a preseason member of the prestigious MAC Herman Watch List, has started 16-of-17 matches and played a team-high 1,458 minutes.last_img read more

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