Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont Honored by America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP) for the Voices Project

first_imgFor Immediate Release: Contact: Kathy Parry, BCBSVTMarch 14, 2006 (802) 371-3205 or Mohit Ghose, Americas Health Insurance Plans: (202)778-8494Blue Cross and Blue Shield of VermontHonored by Americas Health Insurance Plans (AHIP)For The Voices ProjectBerlin, VT – Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont (BCBSVT) was honored last week with a prestigious national award, presented by the health insurance industrys largest trade association, for the Plans Voices Project teen outreach program.The 2006 Community Leadership Award was presented to BCBSVT by the AHIP (Americas Health Insurance Plans) Foundation at an awards banquet on Monday, March 6 in Washington D.C. The award was created to showcase organizations that demonstrate excellence in community outreach by identifying specific programs in the community, designing innovative solutions, and leading community partnerships for success. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont took the award in the category for small/independent health insurance companies.The Voices Project, co-produced by BCBSVT and Kingdom County Productions, was designed to bring public awareness to the issues confronting Vermonts teenagers. More than a thousand adolescents participated in the two-year program, expressing themselves through a variety of creative outlets, including 45 workshops throughout the state. The project culminated in a multi-media collection of creative work and an original musical production inspired, created, and performed by Vermont teens. The musical toured the state in the fall of 2005, playing to enthusiastic audiences in all corners of Vermont.Karen Ignagni, President and CEO of AHIP, said the recipients of the awards have demonstrated effective leadership in their communities and the health care field.This award recipient embodies the spirit of our industry by pioneering successful health care innovations and investing in unique education and community action programs, said Ignagni. Their commitment to the consumers and communities they serve makes everyone involved proud to be a part of the health plan community.We believe we can fulfill our role as health policy leader and contribute to Vermonts community-based health care system by producing high-profile, well-accepted prevention and education programs, noted William R. Milnes, Jr., President and CEO of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont. Voices is just one of many programs we have created to improve the health and happiness of Vermonters.The Voices Project has also earned the Vermont Agency of Human Services Secretarys Community Award for 2005, and the 2005 Vermont Friends of Recovery Jack Barry Communications Award. More information about The Voices Project is available at www.bcbsvt.com/voices(link is external).Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont is the states oldest and largest private health insurer, providing coverage for about 180,000 Vermonters. It employs over 350 Vermonters at its headquarters in Berlin and branch office in Williston, and offers group and individual health benefits plans to Vermonters. More information about Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont is available on the Internet at www.bcbsvt.com(link is external). Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont is an independent corporation operating under a license with the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, an association of independent Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plans. (End)last_img read more

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What makes a successful overdraft program?

first_img 12SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr For Navigant Credit Union, given their long-standing commitment to the financial well-being of their account holders, it was paramount to find an overdraft provider with a fully compliant solution—along with an abundance of expertise in regulatory compliance, and a track record of great service and results. After completing vendor due diligence—which included obtaining references from several credit unions, they selected the JMFA OVERDRAFT PRIVILEGE® program.  Read the entire case study.“JMFA has a reputation in the credit union community of providing a reliable, turn-key solution that incorporates compliance-tested best practices and a high level of support,” said Navigant CU Chief Retail Banking Officer Kathy Orovitz. After receiving positive recommendations from several of the company’s clients, Navigant was very comfortable choosing JMFA OVERDRAFT PRIVILEGE®.”Orovitz remains confident that JMFA OVERDRAFT PRIVILEGE® and the company’s compliance expertise continue to support the credit union’s member service philosophy in the following ways: continue reading »last_img read more

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Marcus Daniell, Koolhof win Brisbane International doubles title

first_imgBrisbane: New Zealand’s Marcus Daniell and the Netherlands’ Wesley Koolhof on Sunday claimed their maiden doubles title at Brisbane International after they defeated United States’ Rajeev Ram and Britain’s Joe Salisbury 6-4, 7-6(8-6).It took the Kiwi-Dutch duo an hour and 27 minutes to subdue the fourth-seeded American-British pair to secure a fourth career doubles title, reports Efe.“The feeling that we have had from the first practice here this week has been great, and just built on it match after match, and it is about as good of a start as you could ask for for the year and we’re just going to keep building on it,” Daniell said.The 29-year-olds Daniell and Koolhof first joined forces last year at the Queen’s Club Championships in London, winning 15 and losing 12 matches together.“We started together on the grass last year, and we had some good results, we had some bad results,” Daniell concluded. IANSAlso Read: Sports Newslast_img read more

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No. 25 USC ready for return to Coliseum

first_imgAfter an uneven performance in its season-opening victory against Hawai’i, and with fresh memories of an upset-filled week one of college football, the USC football team enters its home and Pac-12 opener against Washington State knowing two things: There is definite room for improvement, and a win is never guaranteed.Thrust into the spotlight · With senior tailback Silas Redd injured, freshman Justin Davis (22) paired up with redshirt sophomore Tre Madden against Hawai’i to give the Trojans a fearsome 1-2 punch in the backfield. – Joseph Chen | Daily Trojan“We want to improve from week one to week two, like everybody does,” USC head coach Lane Kiffin said. “We want to be more consistent in our passing game, which will help with our third down production. We want to finish drives inside the five, and pitch a shutout on turnovers [on offense].”True, the Trojan offense left much to be desired in the passing game. Neither of the team’s redshirt sophomore quarterbacks, Cody Kessler and Max Wittek, played lights-out against the Warriors, though key drops by their receivers and some leaky pass protection from the offensive line exacerbated things considerably.But lost in the mystery surrounding which player will start at quarterback has been the Trojans’ solid rushing attack, led by two inexperienced but talented running backs in redshirt sophomore Tre Madden and freshman Justin Davis. The duo combined for 183 rushing yards on 32 carries in their collegiate debuts at the position, giving the offense a much-needed spark.Though the emergence of a clear-cut starting quarterback would be a heralded outcome from Saturday’s game, look for the offense to again lean on its ground game against the Cougars’ run defense. Last week against Auburn, Washington State allowed 295 yards on 46 rush attempts, good for an average of 6.4 yards per rush in a 31-24 loss. With the possibility of senior tailback Silas Redd returning to action, USC could have an even more potent rushing attack.“I don’t know that [the running game] will change much [with Redd back],” Kiffin said. “We ran more times [against Hawai’i] than we have in three years here, and that was a product of the way the game was going. That’s a great thing to have, so hopefully we’ll have that again Saturday night.”On defense, USC will face a Cougar attack molded by head coach Mike Leach that focuses primarily on throwing the ball. Starting quarterback Connor Halliday had 65 pass attempts against Auburn last week, falling just one shy of the school record. He completed 35 of them, good for 53.8 percent, and had one touchdown and three interceptions, including one fourth-quarter pick in the end zone as the Cougars were on the verge of tying the game.“He played a really great game [against Auburn],” Kiffin said. “He played really well, was really accurate. He was very poised in the pocket, didn’t let the rush get to him and kept his eyes downfield. He played really well, and he had some great games last year, too.”Despite Halliday’s high volume of throws, the Cougars showed a formidable run game against Auburn that had been absent in Leach’s first year at the helm. After accumulating just 349 rushing yards last season, Washington State ran 23 times for 120 yards against the Tigers, good for 5.2 yards per rush.“We know they’re pass-heavy, but we think they’re gonna try and run the ball too,” senior defensive end Devon Kennard said. “They did a better job running the ball [against Auburn] than they have in the past, and I think they’re gonna try and do that on us too.”With Washington State’s newfound success on the ground, stopping the team’s aerial attack will be a more difficult task. Leach is well known for his prolific passing offenses, and his reputation is not lost on members of the Trojan secondary.“You have to keep your eyes open, and you can’t take any plays off,” redshirt junior safety Josh Shaw said. “You have to treat every down like it’s third down. Last week they passed the ball [a lot] versus Auburn, and if you go back to last year they were passing even more than that.”In the USC secondary, questions linger as to who will start. Redshirt junior Anthony Brown and sophomore Kevon Seymour started at cornerback against Hawai’i, though both left the game early because of injuries. Senior Torin Harris and redshirt freshman Devian Shelton played in their absence, and both were shaky at times covering receivers down the field. Shelton was burned on a last-minute Hail Mary that gave Hawai’i its only touchdown.The entire secondary will have the luxury of leaning on the defense’s stout front seven, which is coming off of a dominant effort against the Warriors. It recorded seven sacks and three quarterback hurries even without the presence of senior defensive end Morgan Breslin, who earned an All-American honorable mention last season but didn’t step on the field against Hawai’i because of an injury.That relentless pressure played a large role in the four interceptions that Hawai’i quarterback Taylor Graham threw, and could continue to help take pressure off of a largely unproven secondary.“[Pressuring the quarterback] is always important, but especially in this game because of the amount of passing,” Kiffin said. “We’re gonna have to play really well with our front because we’re gonna have to leave a lot of guys deep to be able to cover them.”USC and Washington State have not played since 2010, when USC won 50-16 in Pullman, Wash. The Cougars have not beaten the Trojans since 2002, and have not won at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum since 2000. Their last win against a ranked opponent was a 34-23 win over No. 16 Oregon in 2006.Kickoff is set for 7:30 p.m., and the game will be broadcast on FOX  Sports 1.Follow Nick on Twitter @NickSelbelast_img read more

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O’Sullivan not dwelling on Cork’s loss to Tipp last year

first_imgO’ Sullivan says Cork aren’t dwelling on last season’s loss. Cork senior hurling Selector Diarmuid O’ Sullivan says that if they look back at last year’s game against Tipperary, they’ll never move forward.The rebels got a measure of revenge in the National Hurling League this year, but the Premier will be looking to make up for that defeat.The two sides face off again in the Munster Senior Hurling Quarter Final on Sunday week in Semple Stadium. Photo © Tipperary GAAlast_img

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