City Hall finds temporary location for Route 42 minibuses

first_img…drivers complain of criminal activities at new locationMore than two weeks after displacing the Route 42 (Georgetown-Grove, East Bank Demerara) minibuses, the Mayor and City Council (M&CC) has taken a decision to temporarily relocate them on Bugle Street, Georgetown. The Route 42 bus park was cordoned off to allow the Stabroek Market Wharf vendors to ply their trade there following the collapse of their facility.On Tuesday, Town Clerk Royston King told Guyana Times that he met with the drivers and they have agreed to the temporary location.“We met with the bus drivers yesterday (Monday) and we had a discussion and they agreed that they will go to Bugle Street, on a temporary basis and they would operate … they agreed that they would operate from Bugle Street in a certain way, using a certain approach on a temporary basis … it is (located) south of the oldThe temporary location where the minibuses are now operatingGNCB Bank,” King told this publication.He said that there were a few objections in relation to the area, “but it is the responsibility of the Council to find solutions to some of these challenges and this is what we are doing”.Some of the drivers are contending that Bugle Street is dangerous for passengers, especially at nights, owing to insufficient lighting and criminal activities.In the past, the Route 42 drivers had complained about thieves in the park area.United Minibus Union (UMU) President Eon Andrews has since described City Hall’s move to remove the drivers as “ridiculous” and “visionless”.He said the move was also irrational as it was clearly not thoroughly thought through.The bus drivers came out on Monday morning to protest M&CC’s decision to relocate vendors to their park.They held a protest that started on Brickdam, Georgetown and stretched all the way to Lombard Street, where bus drivers were trolling through the roadways to secure a spot as soon as one of their colleagues departed.Short-drop car operators who were also affected have already protested and were able to come up with a solution with the M&CC. The drivers have agreed to pay a $1500 fee to the M&CC to use the area.This newspaper was told that the car drivers would be given a lane to operate in at the park.The livelihoods of those car and bus drivers have been severely affected since August 31.last_img read more

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Animal and Plant Tricks

first_imgThere’s no end of amazing tricks in the living world – adaptations that aid their success.  Finding them is one thing.  Explaining them is another.Electric webs:  There’s electricity in the air around spider webs, Science Now says in “Spider Silk Grabs Electrically Charged Insects in Midair.”  Flying insects pick up static eletricity as they fly (a honeybee can pick up 200 volts).  Spider silks get a charge out of greeting the food service, flexing up to 2 mm at a fast rate of 7 m/s when the prey approaches.  More study is needed, Live Science cautioned, to see if all flying insects, such as the spiders’ preferred diet of flies, pick up static electricity.Jumping fish:  A swamp dweller called the mangrove rivulus has a unique hopping method, Live Science reports.  Unlike the largemouth bass that flexes into a C-shape and jumps but gets nowhere fast, the rivulus does a unique tail flip that sends it on the path to progress (see video clip in the article).  On land, the mostly-hermaphroditic fish can live for up to two months feeding on insects while absorbing oxygen through its skin.Self-cleaning guillemot eggs:  The eggs of the guillemot, a seabird, are covered in small conical pimples that shed water, the BBC News reported.  This helps them avoid the saltwater and detritus in the birds’ crowded colonies.  The roughness of the shell may also give the eggs a better foothold on the rocky cliffs where the females lay their eggs.Bat battery:  Using elastic energy stored in their wing tendons, fruit bats get better mileage, Science Daily reports.  When taking off, this “recycled energy” stored from previous wing flaps gives them an extra boost.  This ability is apparently unique among small mammals.  The article ends with a touch of biomimetics: “This research will likely have relevance for the development of autonomous micro aircrafts and potentially also amphibious search and rescue vehicles.”Jerboa jumps:  Jerboas are little desert rodents that look like a cross between a mouse and a kangaroo (see picture in Science Daily).  The small bipedal jumpers have not been studied much.  Science Daily says that their hops, skips and jumps allow them to compete with four-footed rodents in Old World deserts.  The unpredictability of their trajectories gives the jerboas a way to coexist in the niche occupied by quadrupedal rodents.RNA regulates flowering time:  There’s new insight into how perennial plants know they are old enough to flower, and that the right season has arrived.  An article on Science Daily reports that “Alpine Rock Cress Uses a Ribonucleic Acid to Measure Its Age and Tell When It’s the Right Time to Flower.”  The concentration of a small RNA “works like an hourglass,” the article explains.One can hypothesize about the origins of these adaptations by considering horizontal and vertical axes of information.  The horizontal axis represents variations of existing genetic information.  The vertical axis would require gain or loss of information.  With that in mind, we might suspect that the guillemot egg did not require intelligent design, since it represents accentuation of existing dimples in the eggshell.  The most-dimpled ones survived the salty, steep environment to bring a new generation of birds, whereas others were more susceptible to damage or falling.  The RNA hourglass in flowering plants, though, appears to be a system that required programming from the beginning.  There’s nothing about a particular small RNA molecule that would signal a plant to flower unless other systems exist to measure its concentration and use that metric to signal downstream processes.  Try your skill with each organism to see where on the axes the adaptations might lie, realizing that scientific explanations are not necessarily part of science, especially when speculation exceeds testability.  Avoid just-so stories. (Visited 28 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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The JSE All Share index loses steam to head south

first_imgLocal marketsThe JSE All Share index closed down 0.97% as losses in all the indices flagged ongoing globals concerns. Widespread local power outages added to these woes. Industrials were down 1.13%.At the 5pm close a USD bought R12.06, the British pound changed for R18.01 and the euro traded for R13.00. Gold was trading at USD 1205.99 per oz and Brent crude rose to USD 64.43 per barrel. International marketsIn Asia today the Shanghai index closed at a 7 year high, up 2.20% followed by a rise of 0.51% in the Hang Seng. The Nikkei was down 1.17% lead south on a sell off in Sony and Yamaha stocks.European stocks were in negative territory at our close once again on concerns of Greece not making a debt repayment which lead banking stocks down. The FTSE 100 lost 0.90% the DAX retreated 2.24% and the CAC 40 slipped 1.48%After 2 hours trading the US markets had lost ground on concerns of a pending bout of short selling in Asian markets as Chinese futures tumbled after their close. The S&P 500 tracked down 1.08% the Dow Jones lost 1.46% and the Nasdaq had slid 1.46% at our close. Share price newsAmongst the best performing share today were Finbond Group Ltd (FGL) which gained 13.64% to sell at R4.00 per share after 913,716 shares were bought in 178 deals. The Pivotal Fund Ltd (PIV) rose 4.88% to sell at R21.50 per share following 105 deals which bought 1,982,288 shares.The biggest loser today was Naspers Ltd (NPN) which shrank 5.21% to sell at R1834.12 per share as 10537 deals sold 1,245,666 shares. Petmin Ltd (PET) lost 1.63% to close at R1.25 per share after 1,471,465 shares were sold in 114 deals.last_img read more

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Pig farmers from across the U.S. get updates on changing antibiotic guidance

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Nearly 300 National Pork Industry Forum delegates, pig farmers and U.S. pork industry staff assembled in Indianapolis today to learn more about the upcoming regulatory changes to on-farm antibiotic use. The producer update session — an annual activity at Forum — included case studies and tips on how farmers can be ready when new Federal Drug Administration regulations take effect Jan. 1, 2017.“Producers have been preparing the past 18 months for the very real and substantive changes that are occurring on pig farms across the country in regard to responsible antibiotic use. Producers are very aware of the challenge of antibiotic resistance and are working hard to preserve the effectiveness of antibiotics, both on the farm and in human medicine,” said Derrick Sleezer, National Pork Board president and a pig farmer from Cherokee, Iowa. “Our industry is committed to continuous improvement, and these sessions today ensure that we all have the latest information to apply to our operations when we return home.”The new FDA guidelines define how medically important feed-grade antibiotics will be used to treat, control and prevent disease, as well as remove medically important antibiotic use for growth promotion. Also, the new regulations define the importance of a veterinarian-client-patient relationship (VCPR), establish a veterinary feed directive (VFD) requirement for many more antibiotics and establish a higher standard for on-farm record-keeping.Moderated by National Pork Producer Council Chief Veterinarian Dr. Liz Wagstrom, update session presenters covered all aspects of on-farm antibiotic use, including:Dr. Lonnie King, Ohio State University, focused broadly on the subject of antibiotic resistance.Dr. Tom Burkgren, American Association of Swine Veterinarians, detailed the importance of establishing a VCPR and how the new requirements for feed directives will work.Randy Spronk of Spronk Brothers Farms, Minnesota, shared real-life challenges and opportunities facing pig farmers as they improve practices to reduce the need for antibiotics.“The bottom-line message to pork producers is act now — do not wait until January of next year to make these important changes in how you raise pigs,” Spronk said. “This is a defining moment for our industry, and change will not come without some sacrifice. But preserving the effectiveness of medically important antibiotics is critical in our commitment to ensure a safe food supply and to build consumer trust.”As part of the education session, the National Pork Board introduced its new Pork Industry Guide to Responsible Antibiotic Use. The 12-page guide expands on the industry’s Pork Quality Assurance Plus (PQA Plus) program, supports the industry’s stewardship plan and defines a six-point checklist for success that will help pork producers best prepare for the regulatory changes.The PQA Plus supplement is just one element of a nearly $2 million investment that the Pork Checkoff is making in 2016 to support antibiotic awareness and education among the industry’s 60,000 pork producers. Other activities include facilitating five distinct research projects, developing producer education materials and advertising in national farm trade publications. Also, the Pork Checkoff will host special events to ensure that packers, processors, foodservice and retail customers fully understand how seriously the U.S. pork industry is addressing this production change.last_img read more

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Relationships With Telecoms Gets NSA 75% Of Internet Traffic

first_imgHow Intelligent Data Addresses the Chasm in Cloud The NSA’s new Utah Data Center, codenamed Bumblehive, under construction.The National Security Agency is probably wishing for the days it wasn’t in the news. But following the leak of classified information from former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, headlines are nearly a daily occurrence.Case in point: the Wall Street Journal is reporting new information that demonstrates the NSA has the ability to intercept about 75% of all U.S. Internet traffic though various programs that work with telecom companies like AT&T and Verizon.Notably, like their counterpart Internet companies in Project PRISM, such telecoms also appear to have a special relationship with the NSA and U.S. intelligence agencies. Not only are the data collections at risk for broad surveillance practices, but the networks themselves are appearing to be increasingly ill-suited for anyone expecting privacy in their Internet transactions.Once requests are made for blocks of Internet traffic the NSA suspects may be of interest—such as foreign intelligence, criminal or encrypted traffic—the telecom companies will perform a first-level filtering on their data and deliver it to the NSA. At that point, the NSA copies the data and starts aggressively searching for items of interest with a second-level pass.Even as the WSJ’s sources detailed the logistics of what is going on with the NSA’s data collection activities, several sources in the WSJ article emphasized that if domestic information and data is accidentally scooped up in their searches, it is quickly destroyed once it is shown to be irrelevant.But the flip side seems to be equally true: if any domestic data is found to be interesting, then it’s neatly tucked away for later analysis. Such collection of U.S. citizens’ data would seem to be walking right up to the line of the U.S. Constitution’s Fourth Amendment, if not crossing it. The problem is, with intelligence-gathering warrants shrouded in as much secrecy as the methods used to gather data, there’s no way to tell. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting readwrite Cloud Hosting for WordPress: Why Everyone is Mo…center_img Tags:#now#nsa#Prism Serverless Backups: Viable Data Protection for … Related Posts last_img read more

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Nissan drives in new diesel Micra

first_imgBuoyed by the success of its hatchback Micra, Nissan Motor India Pvt Ltd (NMIPL) on Friday said it will launch a sedan by the end of next year.”We are very excited with the success of Nissan Micra. We are planning to add more models in India from our global stable to get better market share,” Satoshi Matsutomi, vice-president, NMIPL said on the sidelines of the launch of the diesel variant of its small car Micra. The model is priced between Rs 5.59 lakh and Rs 6.05 lakh (ex-showroom Delhi). Bookings for the diesel variant have already started.”We will be launching a sedan by the end of next year. There will be one more model that we will be adding by 2012,” Matsuomi said.He, however, did not reveal any further details on the name and pricing of the new sedan.The diesel version of Micra is powered by a 1.5 litre diesel engine and is available in two variants with five- speed manual transmission. The firm claims it has a fuel economy of 23.08 km per litre.The company had launched the petrol version of the Micra in July this year and has sold 6,000 units so far.Manoj Kumar, vice- president ( operations), Hover Automotive India Pvt Ltd, said, ” We are still working on what name to give ( to the sedan) but we will be launching both the petrol as well as the diesel variants soon.” ” We have the technology in place now but it is too soon to reveal the configurations of the engines. As far as the price is concerned it is too early to comment on that. But it will be very competitive,” Kumar said.advertisementThe Nissan sedan will compete with the Volkswagen Vento and the Honda City and will be produced in Nissan- Renault’s Chennai plant.He also hinted at another model – a mini sports utility vehicle ( SUV) – that the company has been planning for some time.last_img read more

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Shahid Afridi turns down Najam Sethi’s farewell offer

first_imgFormer Pakistan T20 skipper Shahid Afridi has declined Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) Executive Committee chairman Najam Sethi’s offer to give him a farewell upon his retirement from international cricket.On Friday, Afridi took to Twitter to thank Sethi for meeting him last Sunday and offering to arrange a “fitting farewell” for him.”Thank you for the meeting and farewell offers @najamsethi. Unfortunately due to my commitments I won’t be able to take them,” he said.Thank you for the meeting and farewell offers @najamsethi. Unfortunately due to my commitments I won’t be able to take them 1/2- Shahid Afridi (@SAfridiOfficial) April 28, 2017The 37-year-old said he was happy that veterans like Misbah-ul-Haq and Younis Khan, who have announced their retirements from international cricket after the ongoing three-Test series against West Indies, were getting proper farewells.”My desire was to set a new trend. I’m very happy that Misbah&Younis are getting proper farewells. I hope this trend will continue in future,” he added.My desire was to set a new trend. I’m very happy that Misbah&Younis are getting proper farewells. I hope this trend will continue in future.- Shahid Afridi (@SAfridiOfficial) April 28, 2017Last year, Afridi had made headlines with his demand for a farewell match during the three-match T20 series against the West Indies which Pakistan went on to clean sweep.”Farewell match is my right”, Afridi had insisted while urging the PCB to provide him with an opportunity to bid adieu to international arena in a befitting manner.advertisementIn February, the flamboyant all-rounder had announced his retirement from international cricket, bringing to an end his illustrious 21-year career.Nicknamed ‘Boom Boom’, the all-rounder was active in the International T20 format after having quit Test cricket in 2010 and ODIs in 2015.Afridi finished his international career having played 27 Test matches, in which he hit 1,176 runs with a highest score of 156 and 48 wickets. In the 398 ODIs that he played throughout his career, he notched up 8,064 runs, with a highest score of 124, and took 395 wickets with his leg spin.His T20I international career saw him play 98 matches and score 1,405 runs and take 97 wickets.last_img read more

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A lot to offer Plans for at least one Arctic university in

first_imgThe world’s only northern nation without some form of Arctic university may soon have three of them.There are plans in all three of Canada’s territories to give their residents a better shot at higher education. Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut all have different approaches but similar goals.All want to give their youth a chance to learn without having to travel thousands of kilometres. All want to focus on the needs of their particular jurisdictions.And all believe the North has characteristics — from language diversity to climate change — that could make an Arctic university a draw for students and researchers from around the globe.“We have a lot to offer,” said Caroline Cochrane, the N.W.T’s minister of education.The idea of a northern university has been kicked around since at least 2007 when a pan-territorial survey found residents wanted more influence over Arctic research. Northern First Nations have been asking for one for 50 years.Arctic colleges offer northern students degree programs such as education and nursing. But the programs are run and degrees awarded by southern institutions.Now, northerners are taking control of their own post-secondary education. Yukon is likely to be first out of the academic gate.“We’ve got three degrees lined up,” said Karen Barnes, president of Yukon College, soon to be Yukon University.This September, the institution will offer its first three bachelor’s programs under its own name instead of those brokered through another university.One will be in Indigenous governance, taking advantage of expertise in Yukon’s 11 self-governing First Nations. The second will be a business degree focused on operating in remote communities.The third will be in northern studies — traditional knowledge, culture, history and current situation of northerners.“A lot of universities have offered degrees in northern studies but this will be the first one actually offered in the North,” said Barnes.Also this fall, the N.W.T. legislature will consider an extensive report on the territory’s Aurora College that recommends a Northern Canada Polytechnic University that would combine bachelor’s and applied studies with a community college to support secondary schools. A search is on for someone to lead that transition, said Cochrane.“I think a university is needed within the N.W.T.,” she said.The Eastern Arctic is also moving ahead.By October, Nunavut Arctic College hopes to announce a partnership with a southern institution. It wants to broaden the college’s current offerings with a view toward the administrative needs of government and the technical requirements of the resource industry.Eleven southern universities have applied to be that partner, said Jesse Jacobs, the college’s director of planning.“What we’re really looking for in a partner institution is to take Inuit traditional knowledge and ensure that we are able to put it into credentials that are recognized nationally,” he said.Cultural relevance is prominent in the plans of all three institutions. Often, southern course materials just don’t work in the North.When Cochrane took her social-work degree in the south, she was taught that privacy concerns meant she shouldn’t get personal with her clients or acknowledge them in the street.“You go into a community of 100 people and you don’t shake hands in the store, you don’t have a job pretty soon,” she said.Language will be a big part. Jacobs said his college’s partnered programs will be taught in Inuktut, the term used for all dialects spoken by the Inuit.Just offering post-secondary courses in the North is a big deal. Travel to study elsewhere is a major cost and cultural disincentive for potential students, Cochrane said.“A lot are intimidated by southern universities. It’s hard when you come from a (tiny) community to all of a sudden walk into a community of millions.”Universities, however, are expensive. Financing the territories’ post-secondary plans remains unsettled, although Cochrane said one source of income could come from research partnerships in areas such as climate change.The Yukon government has topped up its annual $27 million grant to it Yukon College by $1.5 million to help with the transition to a university. The college is also about to begin a campaign to raise about $65 million over the next 10 years, Barnes said.Things are starting to happen, said Jacobs.“It’s an exciting time to be in post-secondary education in the Arctic.”last_img read more

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