City is gunmetal green

first_imgAnd that includes everything from baking the building to get rid of gases and chemicals to using low-flow toilets and cleaning the windows with plain vinegar and newspaper. City Council members were trailblazers in adopting municipal environmental policies, such as banning secondhand smoke and Styrofoam. So, it’s no surprise they are proponents of green construction. The earth-friendly Civic Center, which has received a stamp of approval from the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System, includes the use of recycled materials, drought-tolerant landscaping, recycled water to irrigate, natural daylight and low-energy lighting. “One hundred percent of our steel comes from recyclable product,” said Maureen Tamuri, the city’s community development director. “The city has always had a deep level of respect for the environment around it. It’s part of the way we live as a community.” The city of Calabasas was incorporated in 1991, but has never had its own Civic Center. Offices and the library have been located in rented space for the past decade. The complex sits on seven acres abutting the Santa Monica Mountains on Park Sorrento near The Commons shopping center. It includes an amphitheater and a Founder’s Hall to be used for lectures and community-type gatherings. An underground parking structure has been dropped because it would have cost an additional $20 million. The city is only building on about 1 1/2 acres. The rest will be used for an oak-tree conservancy or left as open space. “We’ve worked hard to make sure that the new Civic Center is a building that will conserve as much as possible and will be a touchstone for the idea of green building and an example for others to go forward in that direction,” said Councilman Jonathon Wolfson. “We’re very excited, very happy with the progress.” angie.valencia@dailynews.com (818) 713-3699160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! CALABASAS – In a bid to build the “greenest” government building in the nation, the city melted down confiscated firearms, turned them into steel reinforcement bars and used them to help construct the new City Hall. The two-story building is part of a Civic Center complex that also includes a one-story library that is nearly halfway complete. City officials hope the $41 million project will open in July. “What we’re trying to create in Calabasas is a sustainable little island in the midst of a metropolis,” said Mayor Pro Tem Mary Sue Maurer. “We’re up against Los Angeles and they do their own great work. We’re making great strides towards becoming a model in the country. “From the time we broke ground until we move in, we’ve done everything possible to leave a minimal footprint in the environment.” last_img read more

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Donegal student told court she was “blind drunk” when allegedly raped

first_imgWARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT: A Donegal student has told a jury at the Central Criminal Court that she was “blind drunk” when two men allegedly raped her.The alleged rape victim was a student at a college when she was allegedly raped by the two defendants in February 2015. In a trial that began last week, the men, who have a legal entitlement to anonymity, have pleaded not guilty to two counts of rape of the woman in a town in the county.The defendants are now aged 29 and 33 and are residents of Donegal. The complainant is now aged in her 20s.In her direct evidence, she told Seamus Clarke SC, prosecuting, that she and a female friend had spent the night at a “student night” in a local pub and nightclub.She said she had drunk a number of vodka drinks, a cocktail and cider. She said they were given free “Jolly rancher” shots and used a drinks voucher won in a “pub quiz” to buy eight vodka and red bulls, some of which she remembers drinking.The woman said when she and her friend left the nightclub she was “very intoxicated”.She said she and her friend were walking home when they came across two men sitting in a parked car. The woman said her friend spoke to the men and then told her, “We’re gonna get a lift home”.The complainant said they drove for about ten minutes before entering an apartment she didn’t know. “I remember being quite drunk and staggering up the stairs, I couldn’t walk properly,” she told the jury.She said she and her friend were hungry and didn’t want to drink any more and wanted to get food. The men gave them a drink which she believed was vodka.“I was very intoxicated. I was ready to pass out and fall over,” she told the jury. She said on a scale of one to ten of drunkenness, she was ten.Video footage, taken on a mobile phone by the complainant’s friend, shows the women in an apartment with two men. Later footage shows the woman falling on the bathroom floor, exposing her underwear, before two men hold her up.The complainant identified herself on the footage and told the court it showed both men carrying her to the bedroom. She said she remembers lying on a bed and someone heavy on her and then something inside her vagina.“I was half way between sleep and drunkenness. I felt like I didn’t know what was happening. I didn’t know if it was a dream or it was actually happening. I was just so drunk.“In terms of consenting, I in no way did consent to having sex with these men or to them touching me or coming near me in any intimate way.”Cross-examined over a statement to gardaí by her friend that the complainant was “definitely awake at least for the first half of the time” that she was “with a man”, the witness said: “I may have been awake but I was also blind drunk”.Asked about evidence that she was heard moaning and saying the word “harder”, she said she may have been dreaming and had a history of talking and moaning in her sleep.She told the jury that she and her friend woke up in the apartment the next morning and began watching the mobile phone videos. She said that one of the men told her to delete the footage and was blocking the door out of the apartment.She said she lied and told the man she had deleted the footage and he then offered to drive them back to their flat in the town.The defence position is that any sexual activity that took place was consensual.The complainant told Colman Fitzgerald SC, defending, that she thought she did kiss somebody in the smoking area of the nightclub earlier that night. She said she told gardaí about it and she didn’t know his name.She said she generally wouldn’t kiss someone she didn’t know.“I would have a conversation with them first. I’m not the type of person who would kiss someone without speaking to them first,” she said.She agreed that if she hadn’t been drinking she would not have kissed him and that “drink has the effect that you do something you wouldn’t do when you were sober”Asked if there was anything else she knew she would do when drunk that she might not do when sober, she said no. After a pause she added, “I probably wouldn’t order eight vodka and red bulls if I was sober.”She said she didn’t remember being asked for consent and would not have given it.“I did not say yes, get on top of me and have sex with me. I did not say anything close to that,” she said. The trial continues before Mr Justice Alex Owens and a jury.Donegal student told court she was “blind drunk” when allegedly raped was last modified: October 21st, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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An evolution in conservation and nutrient management: Kevin Elder reflects on his career

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest A conversation with…Kevin Elder, who recently retired as chief of the Ohio Department of Agriculture Division of Livestock Environmental Permitting OCJ: Could you provide a brief overview of your career and how it led to your most recent role at the Ohio Department of Agriculture Division of Livestock Environmental Permitting?Kevin: I grew up on a small diversified crop and livestock farm, growing corn, soybeans, wheat, hay, beef cows and finishing calves, swine farrowing to finish and chickens. After graduating from Fairfield Union, I attended the Ohio State University graduating from the College of Agriculture in 1975 with a dual Major in Animal Science and Agricultural Education.I was hired by the Fairfield Soil and Water Conservation District in 1976 as a District Technician. One of my first jobs was conducting final as-built plans for a recently constructed Manure Holding Pond on a local dairy. I received training and practical experience in surveying, designing, laying out, constructing and inspecting a wide range of conservation practices including grass waterways, tile, water and sediment control basins, erosion control structures, ponds and livestock manure facilities.I also did conservation planning with landowners helping them better understand their soil and natural resources and select conservation practices that fit their goals for their property. I assisted farmers in beginning to convert to no-till planting, providing technical assistance on soil fertility, integrated pest management for weed and insect control.I scheduled the use of the SWCD’s three no-till planters and no-till drill helping the farmers become familiar with their use.In 1986, I had the opportunity to move to Columbus and work for the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Soil and Water Conservation in the Agricultural Pollution Abatement Program. We provided training and technical assistance to the state’s 88 SWCDs for improving water quality and addressing pollution complaints. We also administered up to $2 million of state cost sharing each year.In the late 80s the Agricultural Pollution Abatement Advisory Committee was brought together to look at revising the laws and rules first created in 1979. The Advisory Committee made recommendations regarding Manure Nutrient Management, providing additional staff and training to local SWCDs and additional cost sharing for farms to implement better management of manure being stored. Working with OSU fertility specialists, the OSU REAL soil testing lab and private soil testing labs, we changed the phosphorus soil testing procedures to actually list test level instead of only giving a maximum value of 45 ppm+. We developed, along with USDA-NRCS and OSU, the first nutrient management and waste utilization standards that had both nitrogen and phosphorous limitations.Then in 1994, I worked with researchers, commodity groups, OSU OARDC, OSU Extension, ODA’s State Vet Dr. Glauer and OEPA’s Division of Hazardous and Infectious Waste to develop legislation, standards and training to allow mortality composting in Ohio. OCJ: In terms of Ohio’s nutrient management, what do you see as the biggest challenges in the future?Kevin: Probably the biggest challenge is getting a better understanding of what the best practices are to minimize nutrient loss in the wide diversity of soils, topography, crops, and farming practices that vary tremendously from farm to farm and year to year. There is a tendency to want to mandate and regulate “the answer” that everyone must follow. Storms and rainfall patterns make a big difference in nutrient losses. Practices that disturb the soil with tillage can increase nutrient losses through excessive erosion. Putting nutrients on the surface of the soil without tillage can result in losses of dissolved nutrients moving with water. Poor soil health, losses of organic matter, and compaction can result in more rainfall moving off the fields either as surface runoff or through macro pores to tile, increasing dissolved nutrient losses. OCJ: What improvements have you seen with managing manure on Ohio’s farms in your career?Kevin: When I was in college in Animal Science, there were classes on feeding and nutrition, breeding, housing, but very little on manure management. Manure was something to get rid of as quickly and easily as possible. The only regulatory standard was a nitrogen limitation in regards to water quality. Manure nutrients were not considered of value for crop production. I can remember being told that you could never sell manure. That has changed tremendously. Today there is a much better understanding of nutrient value of manure, not only N, P and K, but micronutrients, organic matter, biological activity and liming value. I have seen manure auctioned off before it is produced. I have seen it sold and moved several counties away and applied by manure brokers.Soil testing and manure testing and application according to crop needs is now a standard. Prohibitions of applying nutrients on frozen and/or snow covered or saturated soils is now a standard for large permitted farms and manure applied by Certified Livestock Managers. OCJ: What are your thoughts on the recently proposed “impaired” designation for LakeErie?Kevin: First of all, if you looked at the area of the lake that was considered impaired by Michigan and compared it to the near shore area that Ohio had already declared impaired, that area was already larger than Michigan’s. The declaration of the rest of the Ohio boundary will probably not have much additional impact. The majority of the legal authority of that declaration is over point sources of pollution. Even though the designation may not really change things, agriculture does need to continue work to reduce/minimize their nutrient losses and water quality impacts. OCJ: What is your take on the some of the manure-related fill kills in Ohio and how do you think the State should respond to similar issues moving forward?Kevin: I was extremely disappointed in the way those incidents were portrayed by certain individuals and the media. A lot of conclusions were jumped to without allowing the complete investigation to be completed. In the end, the Certified Livestock Managers applied manure following all the best management practices. In one case, application of poultry manure was being done on wheat stubble with the farmer prepared to incorporate and plant a cover crop. The rain forecast was for less than 50% chance of less than a half inch of rainfall. The applicator began to apply around 8 in the morning, at 11 he stopped when it began to rain. They ended up with 2.4 inches of rainfall in just that small area. That caused the fish kill due to the ammonia concentrations. In another case the dairy farmer hired a CLM to apply to an alfalfa field after taking a cutting of hay off. The application met all the BMPs. A rainfall event occurred three days later that caused a fish kill.All fish kills are unfortunate and should be minimized and prevented whenever possible, but sometimes bad things happen. Some individuals want a 100% guarantee that there will never be water quality impacts — that does not reflect reality. The Clean Water Act has an Agricultural Stormwater Exemption that when it first came out exempted any storm caused discharge. Later additional requirements were added that BMPs had to be followed. More recently additional requirements added to require looking at weather forecasts and not apply if there were more than 50% chance of raining more than a half-inch in next 24 hours. Even when those additional requirements are followed and storms clearly caused the impairment and fish kills, the farmers/applicators are still being penalized. OCJ: What advice do you have for farmers in Ohio regarding manure and nutrient management?Kevin: Manure and nutrient management must fit into each individual’s system and be a priority, not an afterthought. There are many different ways that can work. It has to make sense to get it done right. I go back to a real live example when I was working at the Fairfield SWCD. A hog farmer was installing a 1.4 million-gallon storage facility, he had more than enough crop land, but some of it was a couple miles away. All his land was in a corn and soybean rotation and he was going to apply it with one 3,400-gallon manure tank and tractor. We tried to explain the limitations he was going to have — not enough time to get it applied. It took him finding out the hard way to cause a change in plans.I urge all farmers to support the edge of field research that we need for many more years. I have my ideas of what is best, but that is all they are until we have real data on a lot of different farming operations, soils, crops, tillage, drainage situations. Some of the initial data are showing that we need to get as much of any nutrient applied to be in contact with the soil below the surface to reduce rainwater contact and reduce nutrient losses. Make sure that any nutrient applied is truly needed. OCJ: What was the most rewarding aspect of your career?Kevin: Working with a wide variety of farmers, citizens, and agencies to solve problems — I don’t think I ever was limited by others if there was a need to make things better or a different way of doing things. OCJ: What was the most significant challenge of your career?Kevin: By far, it was the implementation of SB 141, which created the Division of Livestock Environmental Permitting at ODA. It was also challenging moving from a position I enjoyed at the Division of Soil and Water Conservation into a regulatory division with only a pen to start with, having to hire staff, equip them, to put a Concentrated Livestock Environmental Permitting Advisory Committee in place to prepare comprehensive rules for the first time, and to have those 6 chapters and over 240 rules go through the legislative rule review. OCJ: How do we balance regulation with voluntary measures to achieve desired outcomes for everyone?Kevin: We need to remember that laws and regulations are easy to make, but unless clear, consistent and enforceable, they will not be effective. Right now we have so many different regulations that it is very difficult for anyone to be in full compliance. There is one set of regulations for large permitted farms, another for the Western basin ofLake Erie, another for small and medium farms, a different one for Grand Lake St. Mary’s, and still different ones for the rest of Ohio. Also, some regulations that come through legislature or Governor’s Executive orders may not match with the current best science. The other problem with more regulations is the ability to actually enforce them. More regulations without the ability to actually follow up with effective enforcement are counterproductive to everyone. OCJ: What are you looking most looking forward to doing in retirement? Does it involve manure?Kevin: Right now I am waiting for the ground to dry up and warm up. I am looking forward to helping by brother day in and day out on the farm, not just the evenings and weekends and on my “vacation days.”I am also working on my house, doing things needing done a long time ago. And after losing Kathleen, my wife of 41 years a couple years ago, I will be getting remarried to my fiancé Betty Colbert in June.And finally, I have had several inquiries to remain active in manure and nutrient management from individuals and others. Then there’s always the manure from the beef cattle on the farm.last_img read more

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It’s Too Little Too Late

first_img Get the Free eBook! Want to master cold calling? Download my free eBook! Many would have you believe that cold calling is dead, but the successful have no fear of the phone; they use it to outproduce their competitors. Download Now By the time you need to have nurtured your dream client and earned the right to compete for their business, it’s too late to start nurturing. By the time you recognize the need to create value before claiming it, nurturing can’t help you.By the time your pipeline is too poor to produce the results you need, it’s too late to do anything about it. By the time you recognize that you need to prospect, prospecting can’t help you.By the time you needed to have gained a serious understanding of your clients business to build a solution, it’s too late to glean the insights that would have allowed you to build the right solution. By the time you present, it’s too late to look for insights.By the time you need to have built consensus around you and your solution, it’s too late to garner the votes you need. By the time you need the votes, asking for the votes can’t help you.By the time you are negotiating over price, it’s too late to start creating value. By the time you decided to push back on value, it’s too late to start establishing it. You needed to agree on the value created before that point.The natural laws on the universe are always on display and at work in sales. You can’t reap what you haven’t sown. There’s no playing catch up. It’s too little too late. Don’t put off until tomorrow what you need to do today.Today is yesterday’s tomorrow. If you did the work you should have done yesterday, that worked out fine for you. But if you didn’t, there’s a high price to pay.last_img read more

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Maroons nip Tigers on Desiderio triple; Archers escape

first_imgNATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul MOST READ In the second game, defending champion La Salle rode the hot hands of Aljun Melecio as it turned back Far Eastern U,95-90, in their first meeting since their infamous brawl in Davao three weeks ago.Melecio waxed hot with 29 points, while Andrei Caracut and Kib Montalbo contributed 16 and 12 points, respectively, for the Archers who also got solid games from big men Abu Tratter and Prince Rivero in the absence of reigning MVP Ben Mbala.Mbala is away on international duty for Cameroon in the Fiba Afrobasket.The Archers came out aggressive, leading by as many as 23 points early on.While it was too close for comfort, the win was just the kind of game that Perasol liked since it achieved one of his targets when he took over the team last season.ADVERTISEMENT Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo View comments Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ LATEST STORIES ‘Why even bother? UNHRC is a toothless tiger’ – Roque PLAY LIST 01:32‘Why even bother? UNHRC is a toothless tiger’ – Roque02:36Archers, Eagles favorites to win UAAP Season 8001:18Why some freed inmates prefer to stay in jail02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. “The UP community may not care what happened during the game, but it generated excitement,” said Perasol.The Maroons led by as many as 11 points in the second half only for the Tigers to come roaring back in the fourth period to dispel notions that they aren’t good enough to contend this season.“A lot of people are not giving UST a chance but it can give teams a fight,” Perasol said.UP 74 – UST 73UP 74—Desiderio 17, Vito 9, Webb 7, Gomez de Liano Ju 7, Manzo 6, Gomez de Liano Ja 6, Ouattara 4, Lim 4, Prado 4, Dario 4, Lao 4, Romero 2, Harris 0.UST 73—Lee 20, Akomo 15, Sta. Ana 11, Soriano 8, Huang 6, Garcia 5, Faundo 4, Arana 2, De Guzman 2, Basibas 0, Caunan 0, Kwawukumey 0, Macasaet 0, Romero 0.Quarters: 18-19, 42-33, 57-57, 74-73LA SALLE 95 – FEU 90DLSU 95—Melecio 29, Caracut 16, Montalbo 12, Tratter 11, Santillan 9, Ricci Rivero 7, Baltazar 4, Go 3, Prince Rivero 2, Paraiso 2, Capacio 0.FEU 90—Dennison 21, Comboy 13, Orizu 12, Tuffin 10, Cani 7, Tolentino 7, Parker 7, Iñigo 5, Escoto 5, Trinidad 3, Nunag 0, Ebona 0, Bienes 0.Quarters: 29-11, 47-32, 73-54, 95-90Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Nextcenter_img Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Menor’s record win Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Finding his team trailing by two points after being in control for most of the game, Paul Desiderio’s voice resonated during University of the Philippines’ huddle with five seconds remaining.“Atin na ‘to, pasok to (This game is ours, I’m making the shot),” the swingman told his teammates.ADVERTISEMENT Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters Desiderio made good on his promise, hitting a fallaway triple off a well-designed inbound play as the Fighting Maroons eked out a 74-73 victory over a gritty University of Santo Tomas squad in UAAP Season 80 basketball tournament at Mall of Asia Arena in Pasay City.“During our last timeout, he called it,” said Perasol of his prized guard, who made just one of his 10 triples before the game winner. “He told me ‘coach, we will win, I’m making the shot’ because our instruction was if you’re open at the three-point area, take it.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingDesiderio’s shot with 1.4 ticks left capped a wild finish where both teams bungled possessions.“I was taking so many shots,” said the Cebuano guard, who made just six of his 20 shots. “Why would I shy away from taking the last shot?”last_img read more

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