DeGale eyes rematch with ‘chicken’ Groves

first_imgJames DeGale believes his European title challenge could pave the way for a rematch against George Groves.DeGale will take on champion Piotr Wilczewski of Poland next month, with the date and venue expected to be confirmed on Monday.It will be DeGale’s first fight since he lost his British super-middleweight title – and his unbeaten record – against fellow west Londoner Groves in May.DeGale said: “It’s been seven or eight weeks since the Groves fight. I’ve been on holiday, got it out of my system and have moved on.“I thought I won that fight – loads of people did. I can’t believe someone can win a title by throwing so few punches. Every time I hit him I hurt him, and he ran around the ring like a chicken.“I did learn loads in that fight. The main thing is that I will never, ever allow someone to nick a fight off me like that again. I fought the first eight rounds like it was a sparring session.“Hopefully now I’ll get that European title – it won’t be a walkover, it’ll be a tough fight. Then hopefully Groves will want to fight and won’t be a chicken. I just hope Groves keeps winning – that’s the real question.“After my next fight, if bigger and better things come along I’ll take that. But if the public want it [a rematch], and Groves wants it, then fine. But Groves needs me more than I need him.Harlesden’s DeGale lost against Groves on a split decision“I want a rematch. I wanted it straight after the fight and told [promoter] Frank Warren that. But Groves and his people didn’t want it.”Wilczewski has lost only once in 30 fights and is ranked number two by the World Boxing Organisation.The bout has been billed as a crossroads for DeGale, 25, as he cannot afford another defeat at this stage of his career.He hopes to follow in the footsteps of Amir Khan, who bounced back from his first professional loss to become a world champion.But unlike Khan, he is determined to resist calls to make wholesale changes and move to the United States.He said: “People have said I should change trainer and move to America – do what Amir Khan did. But I’m thinking ‘so if I’d got that decision against Groves, you wouldn’t say that?’ It doesn’t make sense.“It was such a close fight and I learned the lessons from that, so I don’t need to make those changes. I won’t make those mistakes again.”last_img read more

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Io Volcanoes Go Hyperactive

first_imgThe volcanoes on Jupiter’s moon are bursting out at record rates, and nobody knows why.  Is it the new normal?A press release from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory says it was a “hellacious two weeks” last summer on the innermost large moon of Jupiter, Io (about the size of Earth’s moon).  This most volcanic body in the solar system strutted its stuff with three massive, super-hot outbursts in August 2013:“These new events are in a relatively rare class of eruptions on Io because of their size and astonishingly high thermal emission,” [Ashley] Davies said. “The amount of energy being emitted by these eruptions implies lava fountains gushing out of fissures at a very large volume per second, forming lava flows that quickly spread over the surface of Io.“All three events, including the largest, most powerful eruption of the trio on Aug. 29, 2013, were likely characterized by “curtains of fire” as lava blasted out of fissures perhaps several miles long.Super-eruptions may not be all that rare.  NASA’s Astrobiology Magazine quotes a scientist who said, “We typically expect one huge outburst every one or two years, and they’re usually not this bright.”  This new discoveries, based on careful analysis of photos from the Keck II telescope, are leading him to think this may be the new normal.  “Here we had three extremely bright outbursts, which suggest that if we looked more frequently we might see many more of them on Io.”Huge outbursts were measured by the Galileo spacecraft (in orbit 1995-2003), the New Horizons spacecraft (2007) and earth-bound telescopes, including record bursts in 2001 (10/04/01), March 8, 2003, and 2007 (4/23/07, 12/03/07) and 2010.  No energy source was mentioned in these new articles, particularly one that could persist for billions of years.Back in September 27, 2002, in Science Magazine, planetary scientist Alfred McEwen said this:If Io’s typical heat flow over geologic time is just 10% of today’s value, then we can expect 1012 km3 of silicate melt over the last 4000 million years—40 times the volume of Io. There should thus have been sufficient heat to melt 10% of Io’s volume 400 times. After just four episodes of such partial melting, Io should have formed a low-density crust ∼50 km thick. High-temperature, dense mafic or ultramafic lavas could only rise through the thick low-density crust under extraordinary circumstances.His way out was to propose a magma ocean under the crust; that idea has gained traction in 2011 from analysis of Galileo data (NASA, see 5/14/11).  Still, the lavas would have erupted hundreds of times over in billions of years, according to what McEwen just said.  Material is also continuously lost to a torus around Jupiter, so after a few times through the recycler, one would expect the material to be depleted in the lightest elements.  Brian Thomas at ICR responded in 2011 that the magma ocean theory is insufficient to account for Io’s heat output.  The problem stems entirely from secular astronomers’ refusal to consider a younger solar system, one that is far less than 4.5 billion years old.In 2000-2002, the enormous output of this moon already exceeded what the scientists could account for by tidal flexing (8/16/00), 9/27/02).  Since then, planetary scientists tried to rig downward the heat output measurements, while sticking to the public story, as found on Wikipedia, that tidal flexing is sufficient to account for the energy output (occasionally the truth leaks out; see “Too hot to handle,” 6/12/12, also admission in 7/29/11).  None of the latest theories, though, have addressed the problem of erupting 40 times Io’s entire mass through the volcanoes, or the problem of a growing crust stifling further eruptions.  Tidal flexing appears to be a convenient, but insufficient, theory.  Just last year, a study showed that locations of Io’s eruptions based on tidal flexing models do not match predictions (see “Bimbo eruptions in the solar system,” 4/06/13).  Another admitted that Io’s heat is several times higher than tidal flexing models can explain (2/02/13).The 2013 outbursts, if the new normal, may revise upward the total heat output, straining further the notion that tidal flexing is sufficient.  Since planetary scientists typically shun the idea that we happen to be living in special circumstances (2/02/13), the latest news from Keck may have planetary scientists singing a new verse of Io, Io, It’s Off to Work We Go (5/04/04).Well, we rig rig rigWell, we rig in our minds the whole day throughRig rig rig, that is what we like to doAnd it ain’t no trick to get sick quickIf you rig rig rig, with a paradigm shtickRig rig rig, the whole day throughGot to rig rig rig, it’s what we like to do in our mind, in our mindWith 4 billion years assigned;We got to rig rig rig, from the morning till the nightRig rig rig up everything in sightWe got to rig rig rig, in our mind, in our mindRig scenarios by the scoreA thousand stories, sometimes moreBut we don’t know what we are riggin’ for, yeahIo, Io,It’s off to work we goWe keep on sweating all day longIo,Io, Io,Got to make your troubles goWell, we keep on sweating all day longIo!(Visited 273 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Managing corn harvest this fall with variable corn conditions

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Jason Hartschuh, CCA, Elizabeth Hawkins, James Morris, Will Hamman, Ohio State University Extension Thanks to the weather we had this year, corn is variable across fields and in some areas we will be harvesting corn at higher moistures than normal. Stalk quality may also be variable by field and amount of stress the plant was under. This variability and high moisture may require us to look harder at combine settings to keep the valuable grain going into the bin. Each .75-pound ear per 1/100 of an acre equals 1 bushel of loss per acre. This is one ear per 6, 30-inch rows in 29 feet of length. A pre harvest loss assessment will help with determining if your combine is set properly. Initial settings for different combines can be found in the operator’s manual but here are a few adjustments that can be used to help set all machines. Corn headSetting the combine starts at the header with an average of 66% of all machine harvest loss in corn occurring here. The major adjustments on the header are deck plate width and gathering chain speed. Setting deck plates in variable field conditions can be challenging, hydraulic adjust deck plates help a lot but if they are not automatic adjust you will have to keep up with changing conditions throughout the field. Under normal conditions deck plates should be set to 1.25 inches in the front and one-eighth-inch wider at the back, 1 and three-eighths inches. While this is a starting point, a better method is to use actual stalks of corn and set the deck plates one-sixteenth of an inch wider at the front than the third node width of a corn stalk. If you check the best and the worst corn in the field you should be able to get an idea of how to vary deck plates on the go, possibly make marks on the indicator gauge to know where you want to be in each area. The basic goal is to keep deck plates narrow enough that we avoid butt shelling and ears slipping between the plates into the stock roll but still manage to be wide enough that most of the stalk and leaves get pulled though. If stalk lodging is present, increase deck plate taper, more open at the top will decrease fodder entering the combine. The other major setting is matching gathering chain and stalk roll speed to combine ground speed, which can be a challenge if you cannot vary header speed from the combine cab. The threshing system works best when full so we speed up in lower yielding areas but if the gathering chains/stalk rolls don’t change speed our header loss will increase. This leads to another balancing act of increasing speed for harvest efficiency and seeing increased grain loss. If ground speed is 4 mph gathering chains should be running at 55 rpm. With the ratio staying constant across all ground speeds. Chain lugs should be opposite each other. With variable field conditions, making sure your rubber ear savers are present and flexible will retain whole ears from being lost. ThreshingIf the header worked properly there will not be a great deal of fodder in the threshing system, increased fodder leads to higher threshing losses. The first consideration in threshing settings is cob integrity, which is often compromised in stressed and high moisture corn. When setting concaves the goal is to not break cobs into more than 2 pieces crosswise and not break them length wise at all. The initial concave clearance on most machines is 3mm over cob diameter. Cobs should be coming out the back of the machine intact but when you break them in half, there should be signs of compression. Rotor or cylinder speed should be set using your book and only sped up if concave clearance is set and ears are still not threshed. Increasing rotor speed can increase threshing quality without breaking cobs, better than tightening concave settings. In wet corn, damaged grain is more often caused by high rotor speed than narrow concave settings.  When harvesting high moisture corn, technically anything over 22%, according to most manufacturers, different concaves can help with threshing. Changing the large wire concaves to round bar, either straight or fish bone helps maintain cob integrity and grain quality in wet corn. Extremely wet corn, over 30% moisture, will need round bar concaves to maintain threshing grain quality. Wet corn can be damaged much more easily during threshing. Cleaning shoeThe last settings are in the cleaning shoe, fan speed and sieve opening. In corn, especially wet corn, most if not all of the separation and cleaning should take place on the top sieve. For dry corn, the lower sieve should be closed a little tighter than the top sieve. In wet corn, many manufacturers recommend opening the bottom sieve all the way so that corn easily moves into the clean grain elevator and does not over load the tailings auger. All the separation is then taking place on the top sieve. A common starting opening is five-eights of an inch, then open until the first cob appears in the grain tank and shut one notch. A challenge this fall will be with kernel size. Even wet kernels may be smaller than average this year causing you to need a top sieve opening to be less than five-eighths inch. Kernel size will have increased variability, ears with many aborted kernels will have much large kernels than those on normal ears. Fan speed should be increased until all red chaff is gone from the grain tank then slowed down 30 to 50 rpms to keep grain from being blown out the back. This may actually be at lower rpms this year than most years due to low test weight which makes each kernel lighter than normal and more likely to blow out of the machine. Often fan speed settings are opposite of logic, increasing fan speed often decreases losses because chaff floats more allowing grain to fall through the sieves better. Checking harvest loss and combine settingsWhen assessing combine settings there are four areas of loss to consider. The first is preharvest lost which is one .75-pound ear per 1/100 of an acre, which is one ear in 30-inch rows per 29 feet in 6 rows or 21.8 feet in 8 rows. The next source of loss is header loss, then threshing and sieve loss. When counting individual kernels, 2 kernels per square foot equally distributed equals one bushel pre acre. In order to determine which part of the combine to adjust you need to calculate loss from each area. To check header loss stop the combine and back up the length of your combine. Then for 30-inch rows count the number of kernels in front of the combine from center of row to center of row for 4 feet of length which equals 10 square feet and divide by 20 to get bushels per acre. Each row of your header should be checked, since only one may be out of adjustment, record each row separately. Also check for additional ears that may have been lost by the header and not pre harvest, remember one .75-pound ear per 1/100 of an acre equals a bushel. Record header loss to subtract from separator and cylinder loss. Preform the same kernel count behind the machine as you did in front subtract each row individually from header loss calculate separation loss. Watch for any cobs that still have corn on them this is threshing loss count these separate. A study conducted in Iowa found the best set combines have a total loss, pre and post-harvest loss, of 1.5 bushel per acre. Setting harvest loss/Tattletale monitorsOnce your machine is set to expected harvest losses, adjust your loss monitors in order to use these monitors in the field. Harvest lost monitors work by sensing grain impact on the sensors, grain size and sensitivity can be adjusted to calibrate these loss monitors. Larger grain hits more area on the sensor increasing loss values. Larger harder grain also hits with more force. Usually you adjust grain size and then sensitivity. Good luck with harvest this fall.last_img read more

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Relationships With Telecoms Gets NSA 75% Of Internet Traffic

first_imgHow Intelligent Data Addresses the Chasm in Cloud The NSA’s new Utah Data Center, codenamed Bumblehive, under construction.The National Security Agency is probably wishing for the days it wasn’t in the news. But following the leak of classified information from former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, headlines are nearly a daily occurrence.Case in point: the Wall Street Journal is reporting new information that demonstrates the NSA has the ability to intercept about 75% of all U.S. Internet traffic though various programs that work with telecom companies like AT&T and Verizon.Notably, like their counterpart Internet companies in Project PRISM, such telecoms also appear to have a special relationship with the NSA and U.S. intelligence agencies. Not only are the data collections at risk for broad surveillance practices, but the networks themselves are appearing to be increasingly ill-suited for anyone expecting privacy in their Internet transactions.Once requests are made for blocks of Internet traffic the NSA suspects may be of interest—such as foreign intelligence, criminal or encrypted traffic—the telecom companies will perform a first-level filtering on their data and deliver it to the NSA. At that point, the NSA copies the data and starts aggressively searching for items of interest with a second-level pass.Even as the WSJ’s sources detailed the logistics of what is going on with the NSA’s data collection activities, several sources in the WSJ article emphasized that if domestic information and data is accidentally scooped up in their searches, it is quickly destroyed once it is shown to be irrelevant.But the flip side seems to be equally true: if any domestic data is found to be interesting, then it’s neatly tucked away for later analysis. Such collection of U.S. citizens’ data would seem to be walking right up to the line of the U.S. Constitution’s Fourth Amendment, if not crossing it. The problem is, with intelligence-gathering warrants shrouded in as much secrecy as the methods used to gather data, there’s no way to tell. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting readwrite Cloud Hosting for WordPress: Why Everyone is Mo…center_img Tags:#now#nsa#Prism Serverless Backups: Viable Data Protection for … Related Posts last_img read more

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