Milton tax plan approved by state

first_imgThe state has given the Town of Milton a green light for its Tax Increment Financing District, a move that will allow the town to keep some of the property taxes generated by new development to fund infrastructure instead of sending them all to the state.Recently the Vermont Economic Progress Council gave final approval to the Tax Increment Financing (TIF) District Plan after many hours of deliberation that included a meeting in Milton, public comment, and a tour of the town and the proposed TIF District.  This authorization will help the town of Milton undertake and pay for the necessary infrastructure improvements that will foster responsible economic and community development, said Karen Marshall, Chairwoman of VEPC. A TIF district epitomizes sustainable community development, Marshall said. It funds and builds infrastructure improvements that will foster economic prosperity through commerce and creation of new jobs, it fosters thoughtful, well planned community land use and transportation options, and better housing and health outcomes for the people who live and work there.The TIF District was previously approved by the Milton Select Board on September 15, 2008 following public hearings in April and September that year. The residents, planners and select board have been working toward the development of a town core for a number of years, said Milton Town Manager Sandy Miller. The approval of the Town Core TIF District is an important step as we seek to make strategic infrastructure improvements which will help create additional affordable housing and job opportunities.The authorization allows the Town of Milton to use incremental property tax revenues to finance certain public infrastructure projects like roads, lighting and sidewalks, parking, and sewers that will stimulate real property development within the TIF District.That development, in turn, will generate incremental property tax revenues that otherwise would not have been raised to pay for the infrastructure debt.The TIF District Plan approval was conditioned on the exclusion of some parcels that were included in the original TIF District application and the conditional inclusion of other parcels.Also, before any TIF District debt can be incurred, the town must submit a TIF District Financing Plan for VEPC approval which will detail the debt amounts and types of debt instruments that the town will utilize.Then the voters of Milton must approve debt levels and any bonds to be issued by the town for TIF District infrastructure projects. There is still much work to be done and reaping the benefits of this approval will not happen overnight, Miller said. We are appreciative of the thoughtful and thorough process the Vermont Economic Progress Council staff and board members engaged in which led to the approval of our TIF District application.  The TIF District was the first considered under reforms passed by the General Assembly in 2006. To approve the application, the VEPC board determined that: The real property development would not occur or would occur in a significantly different and less desirable manner unless the incremental property tax revenues helped to pay for the public infrastructure. The Town of Milton met several process criteria including public hearings and the development of a TIF District Plan. The Town of Milton approved and pledged the same proportion of incremental municipal property tax revenue as requested of the state. The proposed infrastructure and real property development are compatible with approved municipal and regional development plans and the project has clear local and regional significance for employment, housing, and transportation improvements. The proposed real property development meets one of four location criteria. The infrastructure and real property development will accomplish several public good outcomes, namely new affordable housing and improved and enhanced transportation systems.With a TIF District the value of the properties within the district are frozen at the time of approval by the municipality. All property taxes generated by that original base value continue to go to the municipality and the education fund.For 20 years, the property taxes generated by any increment above that base value are shared, with 75 percent going to the TIF District infrastructure debt and 25 percent going to the municipality and state education fund.The Vermont Economic Progress Council is an independent board consisting of nine Vermont citizens appointed by the governor that considers applications to the state s economic incentive programs.VEPC is attached to the Vermont Agency of Commerce and Community Development, whose mission is to help Vermonters improve their quality of life and build strong communities.For more information, visit: www.thinkvermont.com/vepc(link is external)last_img read more

Read More »

Syracuse Class of 2015 rises to No. 28 in Scout.com rankings

first_imgAt the end of a summer highlighted by a rapid influx of commitments for Syracuse, the Class of 2015 finally received some numerical recognition for one of its biggest classes in recent memory.On Monday, Scout.com revised its recruiting rankings and the Orange jumped from No. 45 to No. 28. Ten of its two-star commits were upgraded to three stars as SU earned its best Scout ranking since the system’s introduction in 2002.“I’m very pleased and proud of this staff, I think we have a great group of men,” head coach Scott Shafer said at SU media day. “Good fathers and good husbands, and diligent in their work ethic in both the recruiting and football.”The Orange now has 20 three-star recruits, which is four more than the Class of 2014, which also broke a program record. Only three times since 2002 has Syracuse locked up a Top-50 rank. SU has the fifth-most commits in the country, and has the fifth-ranked recruiting class in the Atlantic Coast Conference, ahead of nine programs, including Duke, Virginia and Louisville.The Orange picked up its 23rd commitment on July 15. On that date in 2013, Syracuse only had eight commitments for its Class of 2014.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I’m pleased with where we are, but we have to get to February to finish our recruiting,” Shafer said. “I feel like we’re in a good position for targeting the last couple scholarships that we’re looking at.” Comments Published on August 5, 2014 at 6:59 pm Contact Sam: sblum@syr.edu | @SamBlum3 Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Read More »

Retired prison officers urged to return

first_img– as Prison Service looks to strengthen its ranksThe Guyana Prison Service has issued a call for retired, senior non-commissioned officers of the Guyana Defence Force, the Guyana Police Force or the Prison Service to return in wake of a fire that destroyed the Camp Street Prison and multiple jail breaks.Prison Chief (ag) Gladwin SamuelsThis is according to a statement from the Government, in which Director of Prisons Gladwin Samuels announced that applications from these individuals were welcome. This, he said, was in order to strengthen the capacity of the prisons.“Recent challenges which the Guyana Prison Service has been faced with require us to look at all possibilities in strengthening our internal capacity,” he stated.“We know that there is a core of experienced security services officers who have expressed a willingness to continue to give service to the nation and we believe it would be eminently sensible to engage these officers at this time,” he said.Samuels invited these retired officers wanting to join the Guyana Prison Service to submit written applications to his office at 46 Brickdam, Stabroek.Following the fire at the Camp Street Prison that razed the prison and resulted in a number of dangerous prisoners escaping, it was announced that steps had been taken to boost up the security at other jails such as the Mazaruni prison, where a complement of prisoners were moved.It is understood that since the fire, over 400 prisoners have been transferred to penitentiaries in Mazaruni, Region Seven (Cuyuni-Mazaruni), New Amsterdam in Region Six (East Berbice-Corentyne) and Timehri, East Bank Demerara, Region Four (Demerara-Mahaica). The officer to prisoner ratio has, however, always been a challenge, with it being revealed to be 10 to 1000 or one to 100.In March 2016, a fire raged through the Camp Street Prison and claimed the lives of 17 prisoners. Afterwards, a Commission of Inquiry (CoI) which cost the Treasury some $13 million was ordered by President David Granger.According to the report compiled by the Commissioners, the combination of overcrowding, uncomfortable and unhygienic confinement are all ideal conditions for epidemics, for gangs to prosper and to propagate discontent.Moreover, the CoI found that reducing numbers in prison to manageable levels is the single most important priority for establishing safe, humane and purposeful prisons.It was further noted that repeat offenders have increased by over 100 per cent, “indicating not only a waste of taxpayers’ dollars but also the need for a more comprehensive and structured partnership within the wider justice system.”But despite these recommendations, the Director of Prisons himself confirmed that at the time of the fire, which gutted Camp Street Prison, over 1000 prisoners were being housed at the prison. The Camp Street Prison was originally built to house nearly half that number.The amount of prison officers on duty at the time is still unclear, as records were destroyed in the inferno.last_img read more

Read More »