Richards’ struggles continue in Eugene

first_imgEUGENE, Oregon: World Championships bronze medallist O’Dayne Richards continued his early season struggles in the shot put after posting a modest 19.09m on the opening day of the 2016 Prefontaine Classic at the University of Oregon’s Hayward Field in Eugene earlier.  Richards, who is still trying to regain his best form after a leg surgery earlier this year, says he will have to remain patient and continue to work hard, but was of course left disappointed with his result.  “There’s still a little bit of time but I think I was too cautious especially on my first throw. Its going to take some time and I know that I must remain calm and patient,” Richards told The Gleaner after his event. After fouling on his first attempt, Richards registered his best mark of the day on is second before going 18.30m on his final effort. World champion Joe Kovacs (USA) won the event, avenging his loss to Kurt Roberts at the recent Shanghai Diamond League with a world leading 22.13m effort on his last attempt.  Kovacs came into his own on his last three efforts, landing the implement at 21.57m and 21.66m before capping off the competition with the first 22m mark of the season.  Second place went to Tom Walsh (New Zealand) with 20.84m, with Reese Hoffa (USA), 20.58m finishing third.  Pawel Majewski (Poland) was too good for the rest of the field in the men’s hammer throw with a 80.28m mark. He was followed by Dilshod Nazarov (Tajikistan), 78.12m and Wojceich Nowicki (Poland), 76.86m. Olympic and world champion Sandra Perkovic (Croatia) was not at her best, but she was still the class act in the women’s discus event, winning in 68.57m ahead of Nadine Muller (Germany), 65.31m and Melina Robert-Michon (France), 63.39m. Brittney Reese (USA), 6.92m was tops in the women’s long jump with Ivana Spanovic (Serbia), 6.88m, finishing second and Lorraine Ugen (Great Britain), 6.76m taking third place.last_img read more

Read More »

Sadness as fisherman dies following Malin Head incident

first_imgA man in his 60s has died following this afternoon’s rescue off the coast of Inishowen.The man was the third person to be found after a boat capsized half a mile off Malin Head Pier just after midday.The man was not recovered until just before 6pm following a multi-agency search. It is understood the man was recovered along the shoreline.He was rushed to Letterkenny University Hospital but has since passed away.The man’s identity has not been revealed until all of his relatives have been informed.Sadness as fisherman dies following Malin Head incident was last modified: July 19th, 2018 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Read More »

Secrets to curly hair found in New Zealand sheep

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Hair salons are filled with products that can tame curly locks or enhance them. So the question “what gives curly hair its curl?” seems like one that should be easily Google-able. But there’s no clear answer. Ideas have swirled for decades, and there aren’t a lot of data to back them up.So scientists decided to look at the microscopic structure of hair. They wanted to count and measure individual hair cells, and human hair was too thick for that. Enter a farm in New Zealand, where researchers sheered wool off of six Merino sheep (pictured)—animals with incredibly fine, naturally curly hair. They stained snippets of these samples and looked at them under a microscope.Their key finding was that for curly strands of hair, cells on the outside of the curl were much longer than cells on the inside of the curl, the team reports today in the Journal of Experimental Biology. In straighter hair, the outside and inside cells were more similar in length. Jurgen and Christine Sohns/Minden Pictures Secrets to curly hair found in New Zealand sheep Email By Katie LanginMar. 22, 2018 , 7:00 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country It’s not clear whether human hair is subject to the same laws of curliness. But the researchers think the relative length of the outside and inside hair cells probably determines where hair falls on the straight/curly spectrum in humans as well—a discovery that could potentially pave the way for the development of new hair products.last_img read more

Read More »