Antwoine Anderson shines in crowded depth chart as Connecticut grad transfer

first_imgAnderson believed Fordham’s outlook was bright when he committed there. But the victories never came. Fordham only finished above .500 once, going 17-14 in Anderson’s redshirt sophomore season of 2015-16. The team never made the NCAA Tournament while Anderson was there.For his final collegiate season, Anderson chose UConn in large part because he believed the Huskies would have a chance to make the Big Dance.“The biggest thing for me is I wanna go to the NCAA Tournament,” Anderson said. “And to the NBA after this season.”On-ball defending is the first trait UConn head coach Kevin Ollie brought up about Anderson. Some of the traits Anderson brings to the floor “can’t be measured,” Ollie said.“The experience and leadership he brings to the team and his poise in hectic moments,” Ollie said, “are very important to us.”UConn has plenty of options for late-game offense, including Adams, its leading-scorer. But Anderson said that if the game is on the line, he’ll be lobbying with Ollie in the huddle to let him take the last shot.“Of course, always, that’s the shot I want to take,” Anderson said.When asked if he thinks Ollie will let him take it, he laughed: “Of course.”CORRECTION: Fordham’s place in the Patriot League was misstated. Fordham competes in the Patriot League only in football. The Daily Orange regrets this error. Comments Published on December 4, 2017 at 10:45 pm Contact Billy: wmheyen@syr.edu | @Wheyen3 Facebook Twitter Google+ A 6-foot-2 guard, Anderson was mostly recruited by low-major Division I schools out of Bishop Kearney (New York) High School. Niagara, Boston University and James Madison extended him scholarship offers, he recalled, but he eventually chose Fordham due to its strong business school and the potential upside he saw in the program.After his redshirt freshman season for the Rams, Anderson’s head coach left and the new one told Anderson he’d never play for him, Anderson said. He stayed and turned into one of the team’s best players, averaging the most minutes (33.6) on the team last year.Neubauer and the Fordham coaching staff declined to comment for this story.Now, Anderson runs the point at Connecticut, which has won four NCAA championships since 1999. He’s part of a crowded backcourt that also features Jalen Adams, Alterique Gilbert and Christian Vital. As a graduate transfer, Anderson plays 33.6 minutes a game and averages 10.3 points per contest.“I figured that I would play all four years at Fordham,” Anderson said. “So for me to have this opportunity is amazing and very exciting for me.”College offers wouldn’t come until Anderson embraced playing hard. Anderson spent his early years of high school occasionally questioning what he was asked to do instead of just doing it, then-Bishop Kearney head coach Jon Boon said. He’d had his moments on the AAU circuit, including locking down Andrew Harrison, who eventually starred at Kentucky, in the summer prior to Anderson’s senior year. But the fully engaged Anderson wasn’t on display at all times.His senior year, though, everything clicked. When Boon yelled at his lefty point guard to do something, Anderson did it. The 2012-13 Bishop Kearney team featured Thomas Bryant, who starred at Indiana University and now plays for the Los Angeles Lakers, and Chinonso Obokoh, who played at Syracuse. That season, the Kings won the New York Public High School Athletic Association title in class AA, the largest in the state. Boon credited Anderson as the reason the team won the championship.“He was the glue that kept everything together that year,” Boon said.The college decision for Anderson was drawn out until the end of the postseason run, but in the end, the Gabelli School of Business at Fordham enticed him enough to become a Ram.After redshirting his first year due to academic ineligibility, Anderson played just more than 18 minutes per game in his redshirt freshman season. Then, Fordham fired head coach Tom Pecora, who had recruited Anderson, after a 10-21 season. Fordham hired Jeff Neubauer, who told his inherited point guard he’d never be able to play for him, Anderson said.When Anderson came home the summer after Neubauer’s hiring in 2015, he contemplated transferring. But he decided to stay. This was a personal challenge.“I just wasn’t going to let somebody tell me I wasn’t going to be able to play for them, ever,” Anderson said. “I wanted to go and fight for a spot.”Back at Fordham, Anderson intended to prove himself. Neubauer’s “a big defense guy,” Anderson said, so his standout on-ball pressure in practice helped him earn playing time. Anderson eventually led the team in minutes in his redshirt junior season under Neubauer.Anderson won Neubauer games with his offense, too. Against VCU on January 18, Fordham was tied in overtime until Anderson pulled up at the top of the key, faded away and won the game. Just a couple weeks later, Anderson pulled up from 3-point land in double overtime against St. Joe’s and walked-off once again. UPDATED: Dec. 6, 2017 at 6:25 p.m.Last spring, two colleges courted Antwoine Anderson aggressively. He had just completed his redshirt junior season at Fordham and had been granted a release to use his final season of eligibility elsewhere.Seton Hall guaranteed Anderson would play 35 minutes a game, he said. All that Anderson saw at Connecticut, which also wanted him, was a depth chart featuring three strong guards. As he’s done all his life in basketball, Anderson took the challenge.“I didn’t want it to be easy,” Anderson said.Anderson chose UConn (6-2). He and his Huskies teammates take on Syracuse (6-1) at Madison Square Garden on Tuesday at 9 p.m. The responsibility of guarding one or both of Syracuse’s leading scorers, Tyus Battle and Frank Howard, will likely fall to Anderson, too.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textlast_img read more

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The Board of Directors for the nonprofit Esplanad

first_imgThe Board of Directors for the non-profit Esplanade Association today announced the unanimous selection of Michael J. Nichols, of Boston, as the organization’s Executive Director. Nichols, an experienced public servant, attorney, and non-profit professional will begin at the Esplanade Association on November 29.Nichols joins the Esplanade Association after three years at the Rose Kennedy Greenway Conservancy, serving the last 2.5 years as Chief of Staff. At the Greenway, Nichols was responsible for the Conservancy’s community and government affairs, external communications, and advancing strategic priorities. Under his leadership, the Conservancy negotiated a landmark public-private funding agreement, opened Boston’s first fully open-air beer garden, launched the organization’s signature young professional fundraising event, significantly grew earned revenue with innovative activities, and initiated numerous partnerships with other leading Boston institutions for in-park events.“Michael has proven strategic leadership experience in communicating the value of a public/private partnership to care for – and activate – an urban public park,” said Alexi Conine, Chair of the Esplanade Association Board. “We were impressed with his passion, broad skillset, and record of success in mission-focused government and non-profit work. He will help fulfill the Association’s goal of making the Esplanade an innovative, sustainably-maintained recreational destination and cultural asset. We’re thrilled to have Michael join us.”*Advertisement* The Esplanade Association is the 100% privately funded friends group dedicated to stewardship and improvement of the Charles River Esplanade in partnership with the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR). Since the organization’s founding in 2001, the Esplanade Association has raised over $14 million which has funded new Park amenities, restored Park assets and infrastructure, improved horticultural offerings, initiated new programs and public art, managed a robust volunteer program, and made key improvements to the three-mile stretch of waterfront park.“The Charles River Esplanade is a jewel of Boston parks and I couldn’t be more excited about being named Executive Director of the Esplanade Association to continue the organization’s transformative work,” said Michael J. Nichols. “The Park already has a fantastic mix of signature events and regular activities in addition to its status as Boston’s most peaceful respite from city life. I look forward to working with the Association’s Board, the dedicated EA staff, our partners at DCR, and the Park’s many stakeholders to revitalize and enhance this signature public space.”“The Esplanade Association plays a key role in supporting the ongoing maintenance, care, and improvement of the Charles River Esplanade,” offered State Representative Jay Livingstone. “I look forward to working with Michael Nichols to ensure the continued strength of this important public/private partnership.”Nichols, who received both his bachelor’s degree and law degree from the University of Connecticut, began his career in public service as Chief of Staff and Legal Counsel to two state representatives in the Massachusetts Legislature, specializing in public finance and community development. He later served as Research & Policy Director to the full 13-member Boston City Council.About the Esplanade Association (esplanadeassociation.org)The Esplanade Association is a privately funded nonprofit organization that works to revitalize and enhance the Charles River Esplanade, sustain the natural green space, and build community by providing educational, cultural, and recreational programs for everyone. Working in collaboration with the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation, the Esplanade Association is dedicated to improving the experiences of the millions of visitors who enjoy Boston’s iconic riverside green space.last_img read more

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