Milton tax plan approved by state

first_imgThe state has given the Town of Milton a green light for its Tax Increment Financing District, a move that will allow the town to keep some of the property taxes generated by new development to fund infrastructure instead of sending them all to the state.Recently the Vermont Economic Progress Council gave final approval to the Tax Increment Financing (TIF) District Plan after many hours of deliberation that included a meeting in Milton, public comment, and a tour of the town and the proposed TIF District.  This authorization will help the town of Milton undertake and pay for the necessary infrastructure improvements that will foster responsible economic and community development, said Karen Marshall, Chairwoman of VEPC. A TIF district epitomizes sustainable community development, Marshall said. It funds and builds infrastructure improvements that will foster economic prosperity through commerce and creation of new jobs, it fosters thoughtful, well planned community land use and transportation options, and better housing and health outcomes for the people who live and work there.The TIF District was previously approved by the Milton Select Board on September 15, 2008 following public hearings in April and September that year. The residents, planners and select board have been working toward the development of a town core for a number of years, said Milton Town Manager Sandy Miller. The approval of the Town Core TIF District is an important step as we seek to make strategic infrastructure improvements which will help create additional affordable housing and job opportunities.The authorization allows the Town of Milton to use incremental property tax revenues to finance certain public infrastructure projects like roads, lighting and sidewalks, parking, and sewers that will stimulate real property development within the TIF District.That development, in turn, will generate incremental property tax revenues that otherwise would not have been raised to pay for the infrastructure debt.The TIF District Plan approval was conditioned on the exclusion of some parcels that were included in the original TIF District application and the conditional inclusion of other parcels.Also, before any TIF District debt can be incurred, the town must submit a TIF District Financing Plan for VEPC approval which will detail the debt amounts and types of debt instruments that the town will utilize.Then the voters of Milton must approve debt levels and any bonds to be issued by the town for TIF District infrastructure projects. There is still much work to be done and reaping the benefits of this approval will not happen overnight, Miller said. We are appreciative of the thoughtful and thorough process the Vermont Economic Progress Council staff and board members engaged in which led to the approval of our TIF District application.  The TIF District was the first considered under reforms passed by the General Assembly in 2006. To approve the application, the VEPC board determined that: The real property development would not occur or would occur in a significantly different and less desirable manner unless the incremental property tax revenues helped to pay for the public infrastructure. The Town of Milton met several process criteria including public hearings and the development of a TIF District Plan. The Town of Milton approved and pledged the same proportion of incremental municipal property tax revenue as requested of the state. The proposed infrastructure and real property development are compatible with approved municipal and regional development plans and the project has clear local and regional significance for employment, housing, and transportation improvements. The proposed real property development meets one of four location criteria. The infrastructure and real property development will accomplish several public good outcomes, namely new affordable housing and improved and enhanced transportation systems.With a TIF District the value of the properties within the district are frozen at the time of approval by the municipality. All property taxes generated by that original base value continue to go to the municipality and the education fund.For 20 years, the property taxes generated by any increment above that base value are shared, with 75 percent going to the TIF District infrastructure debt and 25 percent going to the municipality and state education fund.The Vermont Economic Progress Council is an independent board consisting of nine Vermont citizens appointed by the governor that considers applications to the state s economic incentive programs.VEPC is attached to the Vermont Agency of Commerce and Community Development, whose mission is to help Vermonters improve their quality of life and build strong communities.For more information, visit: www.thinkvermont.com/vepc(link is external)last_img read more

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Antwoine Anderson shines in crowded depth chart as Connecticut grad transfer

first_imgAnderson believed Fordham’s outlook was bright when he committed there. But the victories never came. Fordham only finished above .500 once, going 17-14 in Anderson’s redshirt sophomore season of 2015-16. The team never made the NCAA Tournament while Anderson was there.For his final collegiate season, Anderson chose UConn in large part because he believed the Huskies would have a chance to make the Big Dance.“The biggest thing for me is I wanna go to the NCAA Tournament,” Anderson said. “And to the NBA after this season.”On-ball defending is the first trait UConn head coach Kevin Ollie brought up about Anderson. Some of the traits Anderson brings to the floor “can’t be measured,” Ollie said.“The experience and leadership he brings to the team and his poise in hectic moments,” Ollie said, “are very important to us.”UConn has plenty of options for late-game offense, including Adams, its leading-scorer. But Anderson said that if the game is on the line, he’ll be lobbying with Ollie in the huddle to let him take the last shot.“Of course, always, that’s the shot I want to take,” Anderson said.When asked if he thinks Ollie will let him take it, he laughed: “Of course.”CORRECTION: Fordham’s place in the Patriot League was misstated. Fordham competes in the Patriot League only in football. The Daily Orange regrets this error. Comments Published on December 4, 2017 at 10:45 pm Contact Billy: wmheyen@syr.edu | @Wheyen3 Facebook Twitter Google+ A 6-foot-2 guard, Anderson was mostly recruited by low-major Division I schools out of Bishop Kearney (New York) High School. Niagara, Boston University and James Madison extended him scholarship offers, he recalled, but he eventually chose Fordham due to its strong business school and the potential upside he saw in the program.After his redshirt freshman season for the Rams, Anderson’s head coach left and the new one told Anderson he’d never play for him, Anderson said. He stayed and turned into one of the team’s best players, averaging the most minutes (33.6) on the team last year.Neubauer and the Fordham coaching staff declined to comment for this story.Now, Anderson runs the point at Connecticut, which has won four NCAA championships since 1999. He’s part of a crowded backcourt that also features Jalen Adams, Alterique Gilbert and Christian Vital. As a graduate transfer, Anderson plays 33.6 minutes a game and averages 10.3 points per contest.“I figured that I would play all four years at Fordham,” Anderson said. “So for me to have this opportunity is amazing and very exciting for me.”College offers wouldn’t come until Anderson embraced playing hard. Anderson spent his early years of high school occasionally questioning what he was asked to do instead of just doing it, then-Bishop Kearney head coach Jon Boon said. He’d had his moments on the AAU circuit, including locking down Andrew Harrison, who eventually starred at Kentucky, in the summer prior to Anderson’s senior year. But the fully engaged Anderson wasn’t on display at all times.His senior year, though, everything clicked. When Boon yelled at his lefty point guard to do something, Anderson did it. The 2012-13 Bishop Kearney team featured Thomas Bryant, who starred at Indiana University and now plays for the Los Angeles Lakers, and Chinonso Obokoh, who played at Syracuse. That season, the Kings won the New York Public High School Athletic Association title in class AA, the largest in the state. Boon credited Anderson as the reason the team won the championship.“He was the glue that kept everything together that year,” Boon said.The college decision for Anderson was drawn out until the end of the postseason run, but in the end, the Gabelli School of Business at Fordham enticed him enough to become a Ram.After redshirting his first year due to academic ineligibility, Anderson played just more than 18 minutes per game in his redshirt freshman season. Then, Fordham fired head coach Tom Pecora, who had recruited Anderson, after a 10-21 season. Fordham hired Jeff Neubauer, who told his inherited point guard he’d never be able to play for him, Anderson said.When Anderson came home the summer after Neubauer’s hiring in 2015, he contemplated transferring. But he decided to stay. This was a personal challenge.“I just wasn’t going to let somebody tell me I wasn’t going to be able to play for them, ever,” Anderson said. “I wanted to go and fight for a spot.”Back at Fordham, Anderson intended to prove himself. Neubauer’s “a big defense guy,” Anderson said, so his standout on-ball pressure in practice helped him earn playing time. Anderson eventually led the team in minutes in his redshirt junior season under Neubauer.Anderson won Neubauer games with his offense, too. Against VCU on January 18, Fordham was tied in overtime until Anderson pulled up at the top of the key, faded away and won the game. Just a couple weeks later, Anderson pulled up from 3-point land in double overtime against St. Joe’s and walked-off once again. UPDATED: Dec. 6, 2017 at 6:25 p.m.Last spring, two colleges courted Antwoine Anderson aggressively. He had just completed his redshirt junior season at Fordham and had been granted a release to use his final season of eligibility elsewhere.Seton Hall guaranteed Anderson would play 35 minutes a game, he said. All that Anderson saw at Connecticut, which also wanted him, was a depth chart featuring three strong guards. As he’s done all his life in basketball, Anderson took the challenge.“I didn’t want it to be easy,” Anderson said.Anderson chose UConn (6-2). He and his Huskies teammates take on Syracuse (6-1) at Madison Square Garden on Tuesday at 9 p.m. The responsibility of guarding one or both of Syracuse’s leading scorers, Tyus Battle and Frank Howard, will likely fall to Anderson, too.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textlast_img read more

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Election dates to keep in mind as the Kansas State Primary approaches on Aug. 5

first_imgThe following are dates to keep in mind concerning the Kansas State Primary to be held on Aug. 5:•Advance voting by mail began July 16 and ends August 1.•Advance voting in person begins July 29 and ends August 4 at 12:00 p.m. (noon).•Primary election is August 5, polling location hours at 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.Follow us on Twitter. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. There are no comments posted yet. Be the first one! Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new commentslast_img read more

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