Ethanol Production Numbers Reported

first_img SHARE Previous articleKey Farm Bill Vote Set for ThursdayNext articleThe Future of Corn is in Chemicals Gary Truitt Facebook Twitter By Gary Truitt – Jun 6, 2012 SHARE The Energy Information Administration reports that U.S. ethanol production averaged 904-thousand barrels per day – or 37.97-million gallons daily for the week ending June first. That is up 2-thousand barrels per day from the week before.  The 4-week average stood at 907-thousand barrels per day for an annualized rate of 13.91-billion gallons. Stocks of ethanol stood at 21.2-million barrels. Gasoline demand for the week averaged 363.2-million gallons daily.  Expressed as a percentage of daily gasoline demand, daily ethanol production was 10.45 percent. Year-to-date U.S. ethanol export data implies annualized export demand of approximately 900-million gallons.center_img On the co-products side, ethanol producers were using 13.707-million bushels of corn to produce ethanol and 101,744 metric tons of livestock feed, 91,794 metric tons of which were distillers grains.  The rest is comprised of corn gluten feed and corn gluten meal.  Additionally, ethanol producers were providing 4.16-million pounds of corn oil dailySource: NAFB News Service Home Energy Ethanol Production Numbers Reported Ethanol Production Numbers Reported Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Activists and the Media Show their True Colors

first_img Previous articleBill to Protect Livestock Producers Moves Forward in Indiana LegislatureNext articleWASDE Report at a Glance Gary Truitt Groups like HSUS have discovered if they produce videos, allegedly taken undercover at livestock operations and show outrageous abuse of animals, and then release them to the media and place them on-line, they will get tremendous coverage. The media, to their discredit, has lapped up these images without question and jumped to the unfounded conclusions the activists purport. The balance, research, and quest for the truth that used to be the hallmarks of good journalism are forgotten when these videos go public. If groups like HSUS were truly interested in protecting animals, they would welcome this measure, but of course they do not. They have lobbied against the legislation and have even called on their Hollywood celebrity sycophants to write letters to legislators urging them to kill the bill. This is because, if this legislation becomes law, these groups would lose one of their most affective fundraising and opinion impacting tools. Many of the so called undercover videos that have appeared on-line are highly edited and often accompanied with dramatic music.  Independent analysis of some of these videos has shown that actual abuse did not occur and that some of the scenes are approved animal husbandry practices distorted to appear to be abusive.  The subsequent use of these images by the media has resulted in personal and financial damage being done to individual producers as well as entire industries.By Gary Truitt SHARE Facebook Twitter By Gary Truitt – Mar 10, 2013  Adolph Simon Ochs was an American newspaper publisher who, with $75,000 in borrowed cash, founded the New York Times.  Ochs adopted the slogan “All the News That’s Fit to Print” (first used October 25, 1896) and insisted on reportage that lived up to that promise. That slogan still appears on the front page of the newspaper that promotes itself as the most important newspaper in the country. Unfortunately, the Times — along with much of the American media today — falls far short of the noble goal set by Ochs. Declining circulation and competition from on-line sources have forced print publications to adopt more and more sensationalized coverage to keep readers’ attention. The electronic media, with 24 hours news networks, have started reporting almost anything and everything as news just to fill the air time.  Against this backdrop, activist organizations have found willing customers for their one sided propaganda.  This has certainly been the case for animal activists and their relentless attacks on the livestock industry.center_img In an effort to stop the victimization of livestock producers, Indiana and several other states are considering legislation to criminalize the unauthorized videotaping of agricultural and manufacturing operations. While opponents were quick to dub this effort the “ag gag” bill, the legislation (SB373) in Indiana skillfully walks the line between protection of privacy and the protection of animals. Videos of animal abuse can be taken and submitted to law enforcement authorities within 48 hours with no penalty.  This allows for the disclosure of real abuse to the people who can do something about it. Activists and the Media Show their True Colors Home Commentary Activists and the Media Show their True Colors Facebook Twitter SHARElast_img read more

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USDA Unveils New Conservation Approach

first_img Facebook Twitter To learn about technical and financial assistance available through conservation programs, visit www.nrcs.usda.gov/GetStarted or local USDA service center. For more on the 2014 Farm Bill, visitwww.nrcs.usda.gov/FarmBill.  By Gary Truitt – May 27, 2014 The critical conservation areas Secretary Vilsack announced today are: the Great Lakes Region, Chesapeake Bay Watershed, Mississippi River Basin, Longleaf Pine Range, Columbia River Basin, California Bay Delta, Prairie Grasslands, and the Colorado River Basin. Along the Saginaw Bay, intensive agricultural production, industrial pollution and other factors have created a need for enhanced water quality efforts. The new conservation program announced today, called the Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP), will benefit similar areas across the nation. RCPP streamlines conservation efforts by combining four programs (the Agricultural Water Enhancement Program, Cooperative Conservation Partnership Initiative, the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Initiative, and the Great Lakes Basin Program for Soil Erosion) into one. SHARE USDA Unveils New Conservation Approach The first conservation programs authorized under the 2014 farm bill have been announced by USDA. “Transformative” is the word Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack used to describe a new approach to funding conservation programs, called the Regional Conservation Partnership Program, a concept that may sound very familiar to Hoosiers because it looks a lot like the model that has been used here in Indiana for years. The public-private partnership brings government, nonprofits, and businesses together to fund projects on a regional level. Under the program, eight regions of the country have been designated to receive 400 million dollars in government funding for 2014, with over a billion dollars designated over the next 5 years. Making the announcement in Bay City, MI, Sec. Vilsack said this new approach will approach funding of conservation in a new way, “We’re giving private companies, local communities, and other non-government partners a way to invest in what are essentially clean water start-up operations. By establishing new public-private partnerships, we can have an impact that’s well beyond what the Federal government could accomplish on its own. These efforts keep our land resilient and water clean, and promote tremendous economic growth in agriculture, construction, tourism and outdoor recreation, and other industries.” The RCPP will competitively award funds to conservation projects designed by local partners specifically for their region. Eligible partners include private companies, universities, non-profit organizations, local and tribal governments, and others joining with agricultural and conservation organizations and producers to invest money, manpower and materials to their proposed initiatives. With participating partners investing along with the Department, USDA’s $1.2 billion in funding over the life of the five-year program can leverage an additional $1.2 billion from partners for a total of $2.4 billion for conservation. Home News Feed USDA Unveils New Conservation Approach Sean McMahon, with the Nature Conservancy, says this new approach will move the focus from the farm level to the regional or watershed level, “This approach provides conservation on a larger scale which is what partners like the Nature Conservancy have wanted. SHARE Vilsack said efforts to cut conservation funding in the 2015 appropriations bill now before Congress, will not have an impact on this program. The RCPP has three funding pools: 35 percent of total program funding directed to critical conservation areas, chosen by the agriculture secretary; 40 percent directed to regional or multi-state projects through a national competitive process; and 25 percent directed to state-level projects through a competitive process established by NRCS state leaders. Facebook Twitter Senate Ag Committee Chairman Debbie Stabenow, who helped develop the approach contained in the Farm Bill, says this is the first time more money was allocated for conservation than for the commodity title, “This represents a significant shift in the way we support farmers and ranchers  and how we view managing private lands.” Vilsack also praised Stabenow for her leadership to improve conservation programs in Michigan and across the nation and acknowledged her work to craft and secure passage of the 2014 Farm Bill, which authorized USDA to create the new conservation program. USDA Unveils New Conservation Approach Previous articleACE Reminds Drivers that E15 is Fine for Most CarsNext articleHeavy Rains Force Replant in Southwest Indiana Gary Truittlast_img read more

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Indiana Farmers Plowing Less, Yielding More

first_img Previous articleSuderman Heading to FCStoneNext articleMorning Outlook Gary Truitt Another survey will be taken this fall to monitor the level of fall tillage vs. planting cover crops.  No-till farming methods can reduce soil erosion by 75 percent when compared to a conventional (chisel-disk) tillage system, and is a critical component to improve soil organic matter and soil health. “With the increase in demand for Indiana’s row crop production and the reports on agriculture’s role in the Gulf hypoxia and Great Lakes issues, it make sense for us to continue to observe, track, and tell the stories of the good things our farmers are doing,” said Hardisty. By Gary Truitt – Oct 14, 2015 Facebook Twitter SHARE Tillage transect reports dating back to 1990 can be found here. To learn more about the tillage transect for your county, visit https://www.in.gov/isda/2370.htm# to find your local Soil and Water Conservation District. Home Indiana Agriculture News Indiana Farmers Plowing Less, Yielding More Hardesty says it is not just tillage and not just cover crops, but finding a system that works on an individual farm to improve soil health, reduce inputs, and boost yields. The thin profit margins this year are also giving farmers a reason to consider conservation tillage and cover crops. “They can save on fertilizer use and cut the number of trips across a field,” said Hardisty. “It is all coming together and growers are beginning to realize the benefits of a complete system of conservation.”Hardisty said Indiana leads the Midwest in the adoption of cover crops. “These numbers confirm that Indiana is a national leader in acres of cover crops planted,” said Ted McKinney, Director of the Indiana State Department of Agriculture (ISDA).  “Our farmers were some of the first in the country to discover the economic and water quality benefits of soil health conservation practices such as cover crops.  With the record breaking rainfall this past summer, cover crops have proven a valuable tool for managing floodwater, protecting the soil, and keeping sediment and nutrients out of our water.” She told HAT, while the crop loss from the heavy rains was unfortunate, it did provide an excellent example of the benefits of cover crops and a conservation cropping system, “We had fields across the road from each other that had both been hit with heavy rain. The crops in the fields that had been planted with cover crops last fall looked a lot better than those that had not.” She added that this fall farmers are seeing how much better their yields are from fields with cover crops and conservation tillage systems. Indiana Farmers Plowing Less, Yielding More Indiana Farmers Plowing Less, Yielding MoreJane HardistyNew figures from the Indiana Conservation Partnership show that conservation tillage and cover crops are being used by more and more Indiana farmers, with some impressive results. According to the annual spring tillage survey, in 2015 Indiana farmers saved 32 millions tons of top soil by using a variety of reduced tillage methods. In addition, the survey showed the use of cover crops in Indiana continues to increase rapidly. State Conservationist Jane Hardisty said over 933,000 acres of Indiana farmland were planted to cover crops this year, due in large part to the flooding we saw this year, “We had farmers walk in our door that we had never seen before. They had washed out spots in their field and wanted to get something growing, so they decided to give cover crops a try.” SHARE Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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RFA Analysis Shows Uptick in Number of Automakers Who Have Approved…

first_imgHome Energy RFA Analysis Shows Uptick in Number of Automakers Who Have Approved E15… By Gary Truitt – Dec 21, 2015 Facebook Twitter RFA Analysis Shows Uptick in Number of Automakers Who Have Approved E15 for Use in New Vehicles 2015 Chrysler 300SAn analysis of 2016 model year (MY)  warranty statements and owner’s manuals conducted by the Renewable Fuels Association (RFA) shows that auto manufacturers explicitly approve E15 (15 percent ethanol 85 percent gasoline) use in more than 70 percent of new vehicles. This is up from 2015, when just over 60 percent of MY 2015 automobiles were clearly approved for E15.RFA’s analysis shows that, for the first time, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA Group) has approved the use of E15 in its MY 2016 Chrysler/Fiat, Jeep, Dodge, and Ram vehicles. FCA’s decision means it joins the other members of the “Detroit Three” (General Motors and Ford) in unequivocally allowing E15. Other key points from RFA’s analysis include:GM started approving the use of E15 with its MY 2012 vehicles, while Ford joined a year later with its MY 2013 vehicles.More than 45 percent of the vehicles sold in the United States this year have been produced by the Detroit Three, according to industry data.Other automakers offering explicit approval of E15 in MY 2016 vehicles include Toyota/Lexus, Audi/Porsche/Volkswagen, Honda/Acura, Jaguar, and Land Rover. Together with the Detroit Three, these manufactures have produced approximately 72 percent of the vehicles sold in 2015.When flex-fuel vehicles (FFVs) produced by Nissan and Mercedes-Benz are included, RFA estimates the percentage of MY 2016 automobiles explicitly approved by manufacturers to use E15 is even larger (FFVs are approved to use up to 85 percent ethanol blends).With a U.S. market share of 8.5 percent, Nissan Motor Company is the largest “hold-out” when it comes to approving the use of E15 in its vehicles. Nissan even goes as far as suggesting that “E-15 fuel will adversely affect the emission control devices and systems of the vehicle,” which raises questions about why Nissan is not able to provide the same quality of technology as automakers approving the use of E15. Curiously, Nissan also warns drivers that oxygenates like ethanol “can cause paint damage.”Hyundai, Kia, and Subaru also continue to exclude E15 from their fuel recommendations. Together, these three foreign automakers account for about 11 percent of U.S. auto sales. While Subaru recommends that gasoline used in its vehicles contain “no more than 10% ethanol,” it allows the use of gasoline containing 15% MTBE—a toxic substance banned in dozens of states because of groundwater pollution concerns.Interestingly, BMW’s MINI Hardtop appears to allow the use of 25% ethanol blends. The manufacturer states, “Fuels with a maximum ethanol content of 25%, i.e., E10 or E25, may be used for refueling.”“This analysis should open some eyes and finally lay to rest the ridiculous myth that automakers do not allow the use of E15 in their vehicles,” said RFA President and CEO Bob Dinneen. “In fact, 2016 will be the fifth year in a row in which some auto manufacturers have explicitly included E15 in owners’ manuals and warranty statements as an approved fuel. With each passing year, more and more vehicles sold in the U.S. carry the manufacturer’s unequivocal approval for E15; and with each passing year, the auto warranty misinformation campaign undertaken by AAA and Big Oil fades further into irrelevance.”Dinneen also noted the utter hypocrisy of statements made by AAA and the oil industry that using E15 may void auto warranties. “Ironically, not a single automaker approves the use of 85 octane gasoline, and the Department of Energy (DOE) warns that using such fuel may void warranties,” he said. “Yet, 85 octane gasoline continues to be sold all across the Rocky Mountain region and refiners are fighting tooth and nail to keep this inferior gasoline in the marketplace.”While automakers began approving the use of E15 in their vehicles in 2012, approximately 6 million miles’ worth of testing by DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) shows that the use of E15 is safe in all vehicles built since 2001. E15 waivers issued by EPA in 2010 and 2011 effectively approve  the use of E15 in all vehicles built since 2001; this means more than 85 percent of the total current U.S. vehicle fleet can safely and legally run on E15.The RFA analysis can be found here. Facebook Twitter SHARE SHARE Previous articleClosing CommentsNext articleWTO Agreement Good for Agriculture Gary Truittlast_img read more

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Hoosiers Defend Food Prices and Farm Policy

first_img Facebook Twitter Also testifying at the  hearing was Dr. Ephraim Leibtag, Assistant Administrator, Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and Mr. Andrew Harig, Senior Director of Sustainability, Tax, and Trade, Food Marketing Institute.  In addition, the hearing dealt with nutrition and food assistance programs. Jason HendersonHenderson defended the use of crop insurance subsidies saying it helps taxpayers by keeping food prices more stable, “While taxpayer dollars are used to subsidize a part of crop insurance premiums, if that funding was taken away, it would cost consumers over $2 billion in lost economic value.” Hoosiers Defend Food Prices and Farm Policy SHARE Previous articleJapan Renews Interest in US CornNext articleIndiana Planting Comes to a Standstill Gary Truitt SHARE Food Prices and Farm PolicyJackie WalorskiA House subcommittee hearing in Washington on Thursday focused on the connection between farm policy and food prices and had a distinctly Indiana flavor. Chaired by Hoosier Congresswoman Jackie Walorski, the panel of witnesses included Dr. Jason Henderson head of the Purdue Extension program. He testified that the new, market-oriented, farm policy established in the last Farm Bill is making a difference during the current downturn in the U.S. ag economy, “Unlike the farm crisis of the 1980s where farm programs focused on price controls and supply management that often caused sharp spikes in retail food prices, the current crop insurance program helps keep food price stable.” In short, he said farm policy provides stability to the farm economy, “and that will mean steady or even lower food prices as a result of less uncertainty in the food production system.”  Dr. Henderson also defended the use of biotechnology in food production  and assured lawmakers that the US food supply is safe. Facebook Twitter By Gary Truitt – Apr 29, 2016 Home Indiana Agriculture News Hoosiers Defend Food Prices and Farm Policy Dr. Henderson said, while lower commodity prices are having an impact of farm families, they are also having an impact on rural economies, “Declining farm profits cast a ripple effect on the rural consumer. Farm capital spending has declined, and farmers are spending less on main street.” He noted that, during the 1980s, rural poverty rates increased as the farm crisis deepened. He expects that to the case in the current downturn.last_img read more

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Indiana Pork Donates Ground Pork Meals to Feeding Indiana’s Hungry

first_img Indiana Pork Donates Ground Pork Meals to Feeding Indiana’s Hungry Home Indiana Agriculture News Indiana Pork Donates Ground Pork Meals to Feeding Indiana’s Hungry Facebook Twitter Previous articlePrairie Farms Dairy, Swiss Valley Farms Announce Merger AgreementNext article3 Hoosier Corn Growers are Yield Content Winners Gary Truitt By Gary Truitt – Dec 19, 2016 SHARE Facebook Twitter Indiana Pork is partnering with Feeding Indiana’s Hungry (FIsH), Indiana’s State Association of Food Banks, to donate 3,300 pounds of ground pork to be distributed to food banks across the state.   “We are grateful for the generosity of Indiana’s Pork producers and their commitment to providing Hoosiers at risk of hunger with Indiana raised pork.  Donating ground pork to our food banks helps clients eat healthier and access a nutritious protein source that is often difficult for them to afford,” said Emily Weikert Bryant, executive director of Feeding Indiana’s Hungry.The pork donation was made possible in part from a grant received from the Indiana State Department of Agriculture (ISDA).  ISDA awarded Indiana Pork a grant to promote the Indiana Pork tents at the 2016 Indiana State Fair.  For each pork meal upgrade purchased, Indiana Pork donated one ground pork meal to FIsH.  Fairgoers showed their love of the Indiana Pork tents during the State Fair and helped make it possible for Indiana’s 3,000 family-owned hog farms to donate 3,300 pounds of ground pork, feeding an estimated 13,173 Hoosiers.“The entire year, but especially during the Christmas season, Hoosiers are compassionate to the hunger issue around the state.  Indiana’s hog farmers feel privileged to help provide to those around the state who may be struggling a bit this holiday,” said Jeanette Merritt, director of checkoff programs at Indiana Pork.Feeding Indiana’s Hungry was created to maximize public-private partnerships that link hunger service providers, food producers, and processors from around the state  The partnerships enable food and funding resources to be more effectively identified and coordinated to better serve Hoosiers in need.  Learn more at  https://feedingindianashungry.org/ SHARElast_img read more

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Another African Swine Fever Outbreak Reported in China

first_img China has reported new outbreaks of African swine fever as fear of a global spread of the disease rises. Four reports were announced last week, and Monday, China reported a new case of the disease at a farm with nearly 20,000 pigs, the largest farm to report an outbreak. The new case, one of many reported in the region recently, according to Reuters, underlines the escalating threat to the country’s $1 trillion pig industry from the disease despite a slew of initial measures imposed to curb its spread.Until now, the outbreaks in China were reported at the hundreds of thousands of small farms in the nation, not any large-scale operations. A representative of China-America Commodity Data Analytics says: “The fact that the disease was confirmed on a big pig farm showed that it got more serious.” Larger operations typically have better biosecurity measures.Source: NAFB News Service Home Indiana Agriculture News Another African Swine Fever Outbreak Reported in China Previous articleRising Output Compressing Ag MarginsNext articleIt Only Takes a Farmer- Creating Positive Change in Agriculture Hoosier Ag Today SHARE Facebook Twitter By Hoosier Ag Today – Oct 16, 2018 SHARE Facebook Twitter Another African Swine Fever Outbreak Reported in Chinalast_img read more

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Sen. Stabenow Introduces Legislation to Address Food Supply Chain Bottlenecks

first_img Facebook Twitter Sen. Stabenow Introduces Legislation to Address Food Supply Chain Bottlenecks SHARE Facebook Twitter SHARE Home Indiana Agriculture News Sen. Stabenow Introduces Legislation to Address Food Supply Chain Bottlenecks Previous articleHog Farmers Losing Money on Every Hog They SellNext articleHog Farmers Losing Money on Every Hog They Sell on the HAT Wednesday Podcast Ashley Davenport By Ashley Davenport – Jun 2, 2020 Audio Playerhttps://www.hoosieragtoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/HAT-Bill-Introduced-to-Address-Supply-Chain-Hiccups.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Last week, Senator Debbie Stabenow, Ranking Member of the U.S. Senate Ag Committee, introduced a bill to protect the food supply.The Food Supply Protection Act is one of many pieces of legislature driven by the COVID pandemic.Shifts in demand from restaurants and food service to retail and food donations have caused bottlenecks. Stabenow says this bill addresses those challenges in the food supply chain.“It’s certainly not the fault of the farmers,” she said. “The situation happened where restaurants have been shut down—large, bulk purchasers of food have been temporarily shut down. We have one supply chain that goes to grocery stores and consumers, that’s working fine. The bulk purchase side of things is not.”Farmers don’t want to dump their products, and Stabenow mentioned the Food Supply Protection Act will prevent that from happening. It will serve as a bridge to take care of communities, such as providing infrastructure grants to food banks and non-profits.“First of all, it will support the food banks to have more ability to have refrigeration and do what they need to be able to hold more food,” said Stabenow.Stabenow added this would also provide farmers a way to cover their costs and get their food to consumers.“As part of that, also create more ways for funding for small- and medium-sized distributors to be able to retool what they do to be able to change the packaging, have transportation costs covered, and also [provide] PPE.”The ultimate goal is to keep the food supply chains open and prevent another breakdown in the bulk supply chain.“It’s causing food that’s critically needed by families to be destroyed, not because farmers want it to be, but because they aren’t able to cover the cost,” said Stabenow.Stabenow has received bipartisan support of the bill. It’s also being backed by more than 40 food and agricultural organizations.last_img read more

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USDA Invests $281 Million in Rural Water, Wastewater Infrastructure Improvements in…

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News USDA Invests $281 Million in Rural Water, Wastewater Infrastructure Improvements in 36… Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitter SHARE U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Deputy Under Secretary for Rural Development Bette Brand today announced that the department is investing $281 million in 106 projects to improve water and wastewater infrastructure  in rural communities in 36 states and Puerto Rico. USDA is funding the projects through the Water and Waste Disposal Loan and Grant program.“These investments will bring modern, reliable water and wastewater infrastructure to rural communities. They will replace deteriorating, leaking water pipes with new ones and upgrade water handling systems that are decades old. These investments create jobs and improve public health and safety for our rural neighbors,” Brand said. “Under the leadership of President Trump and Agriculture Secretary Perdue, USDA is committed to partnering with rural communities to help them improve their infrastructure, because when rural America thrives, all of America thrives.”USDA is funding projects in Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming.Eligible applicants include rural cities, towns and water districts. The funds can be used for drinking water, stormwater drainage and waste disposal systems in rural communities that meet population limits.Below are examples of water and wastewater projects in rural communities that will receive funding:The city of Mabton, Wash., will use a $677,000 loan and a $296,195 grant to drill a new well. The city owns and operates a domestic water system that serves 632 active, metered connections. Ground water is currently pumped from two wells, delivered to an 800,000-gallon reservoir, treated by chlorination for disinfection and distributed to customers. The new well will augment water capacity, resulting in improved reliability.The city of Auburn, Ky., will use a $6.1 million loan and a $2.6 million grant to replace the wastewater treatment plant to accommodate increased discharge from a new industrial facility. The expanded treatment plant will continue to provide safe and reliable wastewater treatment services for customers in rural Logan County while expanding capacity for economic development.In Terlton, Okla., Pawnee County Rural Water District #2 will use a $1.7 million loan and a $597,000 grant to rehabilitate wells and bring the water treatment plant up to Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality standards. These improvements will enable the district to reduce the amount of water it is required to purchase. This will help lower operating expenses and increase the efficiency and sustainability of the system. The district provides water to 2,174 rural residents.For application or eligibility information, view the interactive RD Apply tool or contact one of USDA Rural Development’s state or field offices.In April 2017, President Donald J. Trump established the Interagency Task Force on Agriculture and Rural Prosperity to identify legislative, regulatory and policy changes that could promote agriculture and prosperity in rural communities. In January 2018, Secretary Perdue presented the Task Force’s findings to President Trump. These findings included 31 recommendations to align the federal government with state, local and tribal governments to take advantage of opportunities that exist in rural America. Increasing investments in rural infrastructure is a key recommendation of the task force.To view the report in its entirety, please view the Report to the President of the United States from the Task Force on Agriculture and Rural Prosperity. In addition, to view the categories of the recommendations, please view the Rural Prosperity infographic.USDA Rural Development provides loans and grants to help expand economic opportunities and create jobs in rural areas. This assistance supports infrastructure improvements; business development; housing; community facilities such as schools, public safety and health care; and high-speed internet access in rural areas. For more information, visit www.rd.usda.gov. USDA Invests $281 Million in Rural Water, Wastewater Infrastructure Improvements in 36 States SHARE By USDA Communications – May 27, 2020 Previous articleTaking First Step Important in Dealing with Intense Farm Stress on the HAT Wednesday PodcastNext articleH-2A Positions Increase Five-Fold Since 2005 USDA Communicationslast_img read more

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