Sen. Stabenow Introduces Legislation to Address Food Supply Chain Bottlenecks

first_img Facebook Twitter Sen. Stabenow Introduces Legislation to Address Food Supply Chain Bottlenecks SHARE Facebook Twitter SHARE Home Indiana Agriculture News Sen. Stabenow Introduces Legislation to Address Food Supply Chain Bottlenecks Previous articleHog Farmers Losing Money on Every Hog They SellNext articleHog Farmers Losing Money on Every Hog They Sell on the HAT Wednesday Podcast Ashley Davenport By Ashley Davenport – Jun 2, 2020 Audio Playerhttps://www.hoosieragtoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/HAT-Bill-Introduced-to-Address-Supply-Chain-Hiccups.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Last week, Senator Debbie Stabenow, Ranking Member of the U.S. Senate Ag Committee, introduced a bill to protect the food supply.The Food Supply Protection Act is one of many pieces of legislature driven by the COVID pandemic.Shifts in demand from restaurants and food service to retail and food donations have caused bottlenecks. Stabenow says this bill addresses those challenges in the food supply chain.“It’s certainly not the fault of the farmers,” she said. “The situation happened where restaurants have been shut down—large, bulk purchasers of food have been temporarily shut down. We have one supply chain that goes to grocery stores and consumers, that’s working fine. The bulk purchase side of things is not.”Farmers don’t want to dump their products, and Stabenow mentioned the Food Supply Protection Act will prevent that from happening. It will serve as a bridge to take care of communities, such as providing infrastructure grants to food banks and non-profits.“First of all, it will support the food banks to have more ability to have refrigeration and do what they need to be able to hold more food,” said Stabenow.Stabenow added this would also provide farmers a way to cover their costs and get their food to consumers.“As part of that, also create more ways for funding for small- and medium-sized distributors to be able to retool what they do to be able to change the packaging, have transportation costs covered, and also [provide] PPE.”The ultimate goal is to keep the food supply chains open and prevent another breakdown in the bulk supply chain.“It’s causing food that’s critically needed by families to be destroyed, not because farmers want it to be, but because they aren’t able to cover the cost,” said Stabenow.Stabenow has received bipartisan support of the bill. It’s also being backed by more than 40 food and agricultural organizations.last_img read more

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Parents claim special needs pupils treated unfairly

first_img#SaucySoul: Room 58 – ‘Hate To See You Leave’ NewsParents claim special needs pupils treated unfairlyBy Staff Reporter – July 25, 2013 1319 via Parents claim special needs pupils treated unfairly (579) | Limerick Post Newswrite. Twitter Linkedin Facebook Watch the streamed gig for Fergal Nash album launch PARENTS of children attending a Limerick school have claimed that it is “elitist” and non inclusive for children with special needs.However, the school principal has refuted the claims and said it is doing “its utmost for the students in all their needs”.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The issue was highlighted when Education Minister Ruairi Quinn visited Colaiste Chiarain in Croom last May and was met by a number of protesting parents outside the school.In letters to The Limerick Post, a number of the parents expressed concern that a number of children were being forced out of the school system.One mother claimed that her son, who has ADHD and Asperger Syndrome, spent just three weeks in school since last September.“The only reason given to me by the principal was that the school couldn’t accommodate his medical or psychological needs”.The mother-of-three said the school was aware of his needs when they accepted him into the general school population.“They were granted full resource hours and a Special Needs Assistant (SNA) for him, yet they claim that they can not look after him”, she added.She also claimed that a report was sent to Welfare officers at the National Education Welfare Board over her son’s non-attendance at school.“How can he be reported when he’s not let attend school. My son is not suspended or expelled, just told to remain at home indefinitely until I find another school. This is being told to too many children who have social or intellectual needs or are not the right fit for the school.”The Limerick Post received over half a dozen letters and calls from parents claiming similar treatment of their childrenStrongly refuting the claims, Colaiste Chiarain principal Noel Malone said the school had one of the most progressive and open enrolment policies in the region and focused on providing for the needs of every student.“Unfortunately, I cannot discuss any specific child or case but, generally speaking, we haven’t had any problems. We work with the National Education Welfare Board and provide school psychological assessment when needed.“It’s about finding the right place for people and not about the school of thought that suggests just because it’s a local school ‘then they can cater for everyone and everything possible’.“At the moment we have four Special Needs Assistants (SNA) and we have been able to adequately cater for all students.Mr Malone said that the secondary school is “noted as a recognised school, distinguished in how we manage and cater for children with special needs.“As opposed to some others, we have a unique enrolment policy which is a complete and open policy that attracts a wide range of students.Speaking about the special needs of some students and the declarations made at the time of enrolment, Mr Malone said “there is a wide range to our student population but in the past, we have found that some parents have lied about, or not disclosed as much, about their child’s condition.“However we treat each case very seriously and try to get the resources required. The student is always the priority. Next year, we will have our SNA allowance cut by 50 per cent so it is the maintenance of the child throughout the year that will be affected.However, the young mother says that she is still in Limbo and the current impasse with Mr Malone means that she is still unable to advance her son’s education. Emma Langford shortlisted for RTE Folk Award and playing a LIVE SHOW!!! this Saturday Email Print #HearThis: New music and video from Limerick rapper Strange Boy TAGSColaiste ChiarainCroomMinister Ruairi QuinnMusic LimerickschoolSNAspecial needsteaching Celebrating a ground breaking year in music from Limerick WhatsApp Previous articleMake your move in Limerick this weekendNext articleAfter Dark – Shannon Rowing Club Latin night Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Advertisement Advice for teachers, students and parents during Covid-19last_img read more

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Calls for play park for children with learning difficulties in Letterkenny

first_img Pinterest Calls for play park for children with learning difficulties in Letterkenny PSNI and Gardai urged to investigate Adams’ claims he sheltered on-the-run suspect in Donegal Facebook WhatsApp By News Highland – October 8, 2012 Dail to vote later on extending emergency Covid powers Man arrested in Derry on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences released A Letterkenny woman has made calls for a play park to be introduced in the town for children with disabilities and learning difficulties.At the moment there is no such park in the town that caters for the needs for people with disabilities.It’s understood the special park would cost in the region of 50,000 euro, and the idea has the backing from a number of Letterkenny Town Cllrs already.Kate McCafferty, whos son suffers from autism, came up with the idea….[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/garden.mp3[/podcast] WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Newscenter_img HSE warns of ‘widespread cancellations’ of appointments next week Google+ Pinterest Twitter Previous article40-year-old woman rescued after breaking ankle climbing Lough Salt MountainNext articleNo approaches from Celtic or Liverpool says Donegal manager News Highland Dail hears questions over design, funding and operation of Mica redress scheme Facebook Google+ Twitter Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derrylast_img read more

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Binman suffered serious facial injuries after being attacked by dog while on duty

first_imgHomepage BannerNews Twitter Binman suffered serious facial injuries after being attacked by dog while on duty Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Pinterest Google+ Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme WhatsApp A member of Derry City and Strabane District Council’s Refuse Collection Services suffered serious facial injuries after he was attacked by a dog while on duty.The incident occurred on Wednesday in the Bogside area of the City, the man was taken to hospital where he was treated for his injuries and has since been discharged.A spokesperson for the council has confirmed the incident is currently being investigated by the relevant agencies. Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Twitter News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th center_img Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Facebook Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest Google+ Previous articleMcKernan will make Tyrone league debut as McAliskey returnsNext articleNew €1.8 million Wild Atlantic Way initiative launched News Highland By News Highland – January 26, 2018 Community Enhancement Programme open for applications WhatsApplast_img read more

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Knight leads S. Utah to 62-61 win over UC Santa Barbara

first_imgDecember 14, 2019 /Sports News – Local Knight leads S. Utah to 62-61 win over UC Santa Barbara Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailCEDAR CITY, Utah (AP) — John Knight III completed a three-point play in the final minute to give Southern Utah enough cushion to hold off UC Santa Barbara 62-61 on Saturday afternoon.With the score tied at 58-58, Dwayne Morgan collected a steal and fed Knight for a fast-break basket that turned into a three-point play and a 61-58 advantage with :52 remaining.UC Santa Barbara’s Devearl Ramsey made two free throws to close to 62-61 with :03 left and when Southern Utah was unable to inbound the ball, the Gauchos had another shot. Matt Freeman’s jumper was off as time expired and Southern Utah held on for the win, halting UCSB’s five-game win streak.Knight finished with 19 points, Maizen Fausett added 11 and Harrison Butler posted 10 points to go with 10 rebounds and four assists for the Thunderbirds (6-4).Jaquori McLaughlin had 14 points and Ramsey finished with 13 for UC Santa Barbara (6-4). Tags: John Knight III/SUU Tunderbirds Basketball Associated Presslast_img read more

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Vice chancellor u-turns on UCU strike

first_imgOxford’s vice chancellor, Louise Richardson, has signalled a change of policy on the University’s position on a Universities UK (UUK) survey about pensions.The survey was used to justify the controversial changes to the pension fund, citing that 42 per cent of institutions, including Oxford, wanted the scheme to have “less risk”.The Oxford University and College Union (UCU) branch have praised the decision saying that “Oxford Uni will now be able to hold its head up high”.In an email sent to staff this morning, Richardson wrote: “In light of the depth of feeling of so many colleagues we will convene a special meeting of Council today at noon and will be recommending that Council reverse its response to the UUK survey in line with Congregation’s resolution.”It follows a tense meeting of Congregation, Oxford’s governing body, yesterday where dons vowed “we’re not done” after some members of university management successfully blocked a vote on pensions at Congregation today.After the vote was blocked, dons in attendance held a symbolic vote in support of the resolution outside in the Old Bodleian library quad. The resolution passed by 418 votes to two.She also explained why she was not present at yesterday’s meeting. She wrote: “I was very sorry not to be there myself but I had scheduled a trip to New York on university business before the meeting of Congregation was called.”She added: “I also hope that we will be able to work together to help bridge the divide between UUK and UCU in the ongoing negotiations. The future of our pensions is a shared interest for so many members of this University that we must try to find common ground…”“In the coming days we will look for ways to improve our engagement with staff so that all members of our community are able to speak and be heard on this very important issue.”The President of the Oxford UCU branch, Garrick Taylor, told Cherwell: “Oxford UCU very much welcome this news, which will undoubtedly let us move into a position where the industrial dispute can end, if UUK listen to what is now without doubt the predominant view of UK universities.“Oxford Uni will now be able to hold its head up high knowing that it is no longer pushing for the end of the defined benefit scheme that will ensure the financial welfare in retirement of tens of thousands of staff in USS eligible universities in the UK.”Richardson’s u-turn comes after leaked University UK documents (UUK) seemed to reveal that Oxford colleges played a major role in pushing through the changes to academics’ pensions which have provoked nationwide strikes.The data showed that each Oxbridge college was counted as an individual institution in a survey used to set the policy, which potentially gave them disproportionate influence in comparison to other British universities.The University has been contacted for comment.last_img read more

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Offers accepted for two of Harvestime’s plants

first_imgHARVESTIME (2005) administrators are processing offers for the company’s Walsall and Leicester bakeries, as attempts to sell the business continue.Administrator John Kelly of Begbies Traynor said offers for the company’s bakery in Walsall and the main bakery of its two in Leicester have been accepted, subject to contract. He said all negotiations are bound by confidentiality agreements, adding: “We maintain an ever flexible approach to our management of this administration to maximise the opportunities for selling the business and its assets.”Industry sources suggest the buyer of the Leicester bakery may be RHM Bread Bakeries. It may need to expand its capacity to cater for increased demand, following new orders such as its own-label deal with Asda.And options to keep the Walsall bakery afloat could include a management buy-out deal. Meanwhile, administrators have made further redundancies at Walsall, which is still trading as a going concern. Between 70 and 80 staff were made redundant at the end of last week, reducing the workforce to approximately 320. The bakery has stopped direct deliveries to the stores of retail customer Tesco and is only supplying its depots and independent shops in the Walsall area. Administrator John Kelly said in a statement the agreement with Tesco had enabled Harvestime to significantly reduce costs, which is part of a constant review of the business.Distribution costs are understood to have been a key factor in the £250,000 a week losses that Harvestime (2005) was experiencing when it went into administration in November 2005.last_img read more

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News story: Refurbished homes for sailors at HMNB Clyde

first_img The Naval Base Command is delighted to see completion of this Service Family Accommodation refurbishment project. The expansion of activity at Clyde and growth of our Service population over the next few years means that we need to make best use of all available accommodation. It is important that what we have to offer is of a high standard, not only because that is what our people deserve, but also because we aim to encourage an increasing number of Service families to relocate to this area. The offer of good housing, coupled with the excellent amenities and quality of life on offer here, are significant attractions for those considering such a move. In February 2017 the Naval Base, UK government and local authority Argyll and Bute signed a unique agreement committing the parties to work together to ensure that investment in the military site benefited the growth and regeneration of the wider community. The Strategic Defence Delivery Framework agreement, as it is known, is aimed at delivering new housing and improved infrastructure, ensuring that both the Service community and people living in Argyll and Bute benefit directly from hosting the base.Captain Craig Mearns, HMNB Clyde’s Captain of the Base, said: The refurbishment of these houses is a prime example of how DIO provides vital support to the Armed Forces. This upgrade work will make a real difference to the quality of life of our Royal Navy personnel and their families. We are grateful to all the residents for their patience with the inevitable disruption caused by the work, and we hope they are very happy with the results. The Ministry of Defence’s (MOD) Defence Infrastructure Organisation (DIO) led the £1.5 million refurbishment at Bannachra Drive in Helensburgh, which will help improve the lives of Royal Navy families already living in the area, and of some of the hundreds of families expected to move to the vicinity when the base becomes the Submarine Centre of Specialisation.From 2020 HM Naval Base Clyde will host all of the Royal Navy’s hunter killer submarines and will be the future home of the Dreadnought class of nuclear deterrent submarines. The MOD is investing hundreds of millions of pounds in developing HMNB Clyde, with the construction phases of the work expected to support a further 1,000 contractor jobs.The development of the site will see the number employed rise from the current figure of 6,800 to an eventual population of 8,500, with up to 1,400 Royal Navy submariners moving to the area from Plymouth. In the future all submariners will expect to serve their entire career at HM Naval Base Clyde, ensuring greater harmony and stability for them and their families. The refurbishment of these 34 family homes also contributes to the joint Royal Navy and Argyll and Bute Council strategy to align the development of the naval base with local needs such as planning and transport.The extensive upgrade work at Bannachra, which was carried out by Amey and contractor Bells Ltd, included the fitting of new roofs, windows and doors, as well as new boilers, external wall insulation and rendering of the buildings. Work was also undertaken to replace fencing and gates and rain water goods, with chimneys on the properties also removed and garage roofs replaced. Commenting on the work, Air Commodore Rothery said: The work of the HM Naval Base Clyde team demonstrates clearly how Scotland benefits from the UK’s armed forces, and how our military contributes to the safety and prosperity of Scotland. HM Naval Base Clyde makes a huge contribution to the local area, providing skilled jobs, supporting the local economy and contributing to regeneration. This project, which will improve service families’ accommodation, is a great example of that strong partnership with the local community in action. Facts and figures of the refurbishment. MOD Crown Copyright.Secretary of State for Scotland David Mundell was there to witness the completion of the refurbishment work on August 28, joined by Air Commodore Wendy Rothery, DIO’s Head of Accommodation, and Captain Craig Mearns, HMNB Clyde’s Captain of the Base.Scottish Secretary David Mundell said:last_img read more

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Milton tax plan approved by state

first_imgThe state has given the Town of Milton a green light for its Tax Increment Financing District, a move that will allow the town to keep some of the property taxes generated by new development to fund infrastructure instead of sending them all to the state.Recently the Vermont Economic Progress Council gave final approval to the Tax Increment Financing (TIF) District Plan after many hours of deliberation that included a meeting in Milton, public comment, and a tour of the town and the proposed TIF District.  This authorization will help the town of Milton undertake and pay for the necessary infrastructure improvements that will foster responsible economic and community development, said Karen Marshall, Chairwoman of VEPC. A TIF district epitomizes sustainable community development, Marshall said. It funds and builds infrastructure improvements that will foster economic prosperity through commerce and creation of new jobs, it fosters thoughtful, well planned community land use and transportation options, and better housing and health outcomes for the people who live and work there.The TIF District was previously approved by the Milton Select Board on September 15, 2008 following public hearings in April and September that year. The residents, planners and select board have been working toward the development of a town core for a number of years, said Milton Town Manager Sandy Miller. The approval of the Town Core TIF District is an important step as we seek to make strategic infrastructure improvements which will help create additional affordable housing and job opportunities.The authorization allows the Town of Milton to use incremental property tax revenues to finance certain public infrastructure projects like roads, lighting and sidewalks, parking, and sewers that will stimulate real property development within the TIF District.That development, in turn, will generate incremental property tax revenues that otherwise would not have been raised to pay for the infrastructure debt.The TIF District Plan approval was conditioned on the exclusion of some parcels that were included in the original TIF District application and the conditional inclusion of other parcels.Also, before any TIF District debt can be incurred, the town must submit a TIF District Financing Plan for VEPC approval which will detail the debt amounts and types of debt instruments that the town will utilize.Then the voters of Milton must approve debt levels and any bonds to be issued by the town for TIF District infrastructure projects. There is still much work to be done and reaping the benefits of this approval will not happen overnight, Miller said. We are appreciative of the thoughtful and thorough process the Vermont Economic Progress Council staff and board members engaged in which led to the approval of our TIF District application.  The TIF District was the first considered under reforms passed by the General Assembly in 2006. To approve the application, the VEPC board determined that: The real property development would not occur or would occur in a significantly different and less desirable manner unless the incremental property tax revenues helped to pay for the public infrastructure. The Town of Milton met several process criteria including public hearings and the development of a TIF District Plan. The Town of Milton approved and pledged the same proportion of incremental municipal property tax revenue as requested of the state. The proposed infrastructure and real property development are compatible with approved municipal and regional development plans and the project has clear local and regional significance for employment, housing, and transportation improvements. The proposed real property development meets one of four location criteria. The infrastructure and real property development will accomplish several public good outcomes, namely new affordable housing and improved and enhanced transportation systems.With a TIF District the value of the properties within the district are frozen at the time of approval by the municipality. All property taxes generated by that original base value continue to go to the municipality and the education fund.For 20 years, the property taxes generated by any increment above that base value are shared, with 75 percent going to the TIF District infrastructure debt and 25 percent going to the municipality and state education fund.The Vermont Economic Progress Council is an independent board consisting of nine Vermont citizens appointed by the governor that considers applications to the state s economic incentive programs.VEPC is attached to the Vermont Agency of Commerce and Community Development, whose mission is to help Vermonters improve their quality of life and build strong communities.For more information, visit: www.thinkvermont.com/vepc(link is external)last_img read more

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The Act of Rediscovery

first_imgI’m often asked, “Where’s your favorite place you’ve been so far?”That’s an incredibly difficult question to answer, and if you catch me on an off day, I may respond in some sarcastic tone and completely dismiss your inquiry.But it’s understandable why people ask. When I attended the Adventure Photography Workshop in Jackson Hole, Wyo., last fall, I suddenly found myself sitting in front of a number of my biggest idols (namely Tim Kemple, Corey Rich, Lucas Gilman, and Chris Burkard). The best part? These guys were willing to answer any and all questions I had for them. These adventure photographers have visited nearly every corner of the world, from the highest peaks to the deepest seas, and so of course, my first question went something along the lines of, “Where’s your favorite place you’ve been?”But if there’s anything these past six (oh my goodness – SIX?!) months of living on the road have taught me, it’s that the real pleasures of life lie in the act of rediscovery. While discovering a new place is certainly an exciting, novel means of diving headfirst into the unknown, some of my greatest memories from the road have been in rediscovering an area I consider familiar.Allow me to explain.This past weekend, I found myself back in a town I fondly refer to as “home” – Damascus, Va. Damascus was my home away from home in college. When I wasn’t in class or studying for tests, I was running on the Appalachian Trail, drinking coffee at Mojoe’s, or paddling on the number of class II-III creeks and rivers that converge in the heart of town. I loved this little mountain oasis so much so, that my senior year in college, I decided to live just outside of town on a little hill in a little white house and commute 20 minutes to school every day.I must have run that same 8-mile stretch of trail dozens of times. And the rivers? Surely the number of trips I’ve taken down the South Fork of the Holston River alone rank in the triple digits. Until this past weekend, I thought I knew everything that Damascus had to offer.As is tradition within the paddling “fam” in Damascus, Sunday is church day. When the local river is running, we paddle. The South Fork of the Holston is a quiet little class II run most of the year. It’s our stomping grounds, the river that taught us to read water and catch eddies and ferry across current. I remember being scared, standing on the banks of the put-in at Drowning Ford (the name certainly didn’t help those first-timer-nerves) and decked from head-to-toe in borrowed gear. Back then, the South Fork was a raging monster of a river, unnavigable at best. I and my little kayak were just along for the ride, powerless to the fickle whims of the river.But as time went on, the South Fork became less of a beast and more of a nurturing momma bear. We’d do full moon and new moon paddles, group floatillas with 30+ people and every assortment of craft you can imagine. We’d do laps or connect sections of river further upstream or park and play all day at the surf hole. Heck, we’d even booze cruise the damn thing in the dead of winter (there’s nothing a little Peppermint Schnapps can’t handle). Eventually though, especially after I’d spent a couple seasons guiding in the New River Gorge and paddling elsewhere throughout the Southeast, the South Fork became a little boring, and I began to lose sight of the true beauty and magic of that river.And then this past Sunday, I rediscovered that feeling of awe I experienced all those years ago. As our group floated downstream toward the confluence of Laurel Creek and the South Fork of the Holston, we pulled off on river right to check out a rock feature that starts to resemble a cave at lower water levels. As I explored deep back into the crevasses, I realized I’d never done this before. All of those years I’d spent paddling this same stretch of river and not once had I ever veered off the main flow to prod beneath the cliff face.The river glimmered in the sunlight, bouncing a mirage of watery illusions on the rock above. In that moment, it didn’t feel like I was back on my home turf, paddling with the people that taught me to kayak. It felt strangely surreal, exotic, like the river was entirely foreign yet faintly familiar all in one go.DCIM102GOPRODCIM102GOPROWe peeled out and continued floating downstream. As the current lapped at my boat, so too did those images of watery reflections on stone cold sandstone. The sun was shining. The water, frigid but surprisingly clear given its long journey down the mountain. Our group of five chattered quietly as we paddled along. There was no sense of urgency in our strokes, no need for checking the clock. We were on river time. I thought to myself how simple and how beautiful it all was, this day on the water.And then, all at once, our group chattering fell quiet. The faint flapping of wings overhead made us all turn our chins to the sky. The shadow of a bald eagle slowly came into view as it carved across the river, settling on a branch just downstream of us. When we caught up to him, he peered questioningly at us from his perch, as if to say, “What the hell are you looking at?” He didn’t fly away though, seemingly unperturbed by our floating posse of plastic boats. Instead, he lazily drifted downstream and landed on another branch, like a guide showing a trip down the river.DCIM102GOPRO DCIM102GOPRONo one spoke as we continued floating, heads craned back and eyes squinting to see the fading silhouette of our escort against the afternoon sun. I’ve seen herons and osprey on this river before, but never a bald eagle, and never so intimately. We eventually lost sight of our river guide, and about the only words I could summon were “dude” and “whoa.”Even after our paddle as I was driving north to my parents’ home in northern Virginia, the magic of those two little moments lingered in my mind. Sure, perhaps the South Fork of the Holston isn’t on the bucket list of must-paddle rivers in the Southeast, but that doesn’t make it any less of a gem.###The next time you find yourself somewhere you’ve been a million times before, take the time to stop and look at it with a fresh pair of eyes. You might be surprised with what you find.last_img read more

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