Diamond Trust Bank of Kenya Limited (DTK.ke) HY2012 Interim Report

first_imgDiamond Trust Bank of Kenya Limited (DTK.ke) listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2012 interim results for the half year.For more information about Diamond Trust Bank of Kenya Limited (DTK.ke) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Diamond Trust Bank of Kenya Limited (DTK.ke) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Diamond Trust Bank of Kenya Limited (DTK.ke)  2012 interim results for the half year.Company ProfileDiamond Trust Bank of Kenya Limited is a financial services and insurance group providing products and services to clients in Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda and Burundi. The company offers a diverse range of products for transactional banking as well as a full service offering for mortgages, asset financing and an insurance premium finance facility. Its treasury services include spot and forward foreign exchange transactions, cross currency swaps and deals, fixed income securities, corporate bonds, fixed income securities, structured treasury products and money market products. Its trade finance services include letters of credit, documentary and clean collections, negotiation of export bills, suppliers credit financing and bank guarantees. Formerly known as Diamond Trust of Kenya, the company changed its name to Diamond Trust Bank Kenya Limited in 1997. Its head office is based in Nairobi, Kenya. Diamond Trust Bank of Kenya Limited is listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchangelast_img read more

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St. James, the smallest parish in the Diocese of West…

first_img January 24, 2012 at 2:14 pm Great story……………………………sounds like a great church……….with wonderful folks……..Peace Rector Pittsburgh, PA [The Church News] It’s Sunday afternoon at the farthest reach of the Diocese of West Texas. Under cotton puff clouds floating lazily in a sparkling blue sky, a handful of parishioners arrive for services at St. James Episcopal Church.You wonder where they’re coming from. Except for the stone footprint of an old frontier fort, the horizon is unencumbered by any signs of human habitation. The scene is virtually unchanged from what the first ranchers, settlers and soldiers saw 150 years ago.But arrive they do at their small rock church with a white cross on top, from isolated pockets across the empty landscape, in vans, SUVs and pickup trucks, some caked in caliche dust. There are no sedans or small imports.The vicar, the Rev. Christopher Roque, arrives with wife Tish and their two children, Matthew and Ethan. They chat briefly with church members congregating at the front door before heading inside for the 3 p.m. Communion service.He’s wearing a white straw Stetson, leather vest, Levis cinched up with a big silver belt buckle with a Texas star in the middle, tall leather boots, a beautiful silver crucifix and a clerical collar. From a tooled leather briefcase he dispenses today’s scripture readings.There is no procession or music. Roque walks to the front of the church and starts Rite II.  With his sermon, the entire service is over in 45 minutes.Afterward, Roque is almost apologetic that there were only 9 in attendance today.No need to apologize, Father. This is a story about the smallest parish in the diocese.St. James sits in the crossroads town of Fort McKavett, population 4, some 170 miles west of San Antonio. Besides St. James, the tiny hamlet consists of a post office, fire station and the Fort McKavett State Historical Site.  It’s so remote that you have to drive to Sonora, 41 miles south, for a loaf of bread or tank of gasoline.Church members gather outside after services on a recent Sunday. PHOTO/ Mike PattersonOn Sundays, “Father Chris” as he’s affectionately known to his parishioners, conducts services at St. John’s Episcopal Church in Sonora in the morning, and then treks up to Fort McKavett twice a month for the 3 p.m. Communion at St. James.“If called to Sonora as rector, it’s conditional that you are vicar at St. James,” Roque said.  “The diocese kind of yokes the two churches together.”St. James probably would never have existed if it hadn’t been for the presence of Fort McKavett, a prominent cavalry and infantry base active in the mid-19th century.The fort, which Gen. William T. Sherman called “the prettiest post in Texas,” was established in 1852 to protect settlers and California-bound travellers from Comanches, Kiowas and other nomadic tribes.  All four regiments of the Buffalo Soldiers – the African-American cavalry and infantry units – served at one time or another there.The Episcopal Church’s connection to Fort McKavett and many other frontier outposts is due to the fact that the Army was fond of Episcopal priests serving as chaplains.“The Army liked the regimented liturgy of the Episcopal Church,” Roque said.  Church services were held at the fort’s school house and attracted soldiers and settlers alike.When the fort closed in 1883, the chaplains left, the services at the base ended and the area was left without a church or Episcopal minister. So “the local residents demanded that the bishop give them their own priest,” Roque said. They founded St. James as a mission in 1884 and formally organized the church in 1889.A decade later they built their first church, a wooden structure that was so damaged by a twister that the bishop eventually condemned it and ordered all the furnishings removed for safekeeping. The present rock building was constructed in 1941.“Many prayers have bounced off these walls,” said Bishop’s Warden Jimmy Martin.Some dozen or so parishioners are Sunday regulars, while 30 to 40 might show up at Easter.  Not all of those who attend services are confirmed Episcopalians, either.  Some belong to other denominations but attend St. James because it’s the only church around.“We keep hanging in there,” Martin said.  “We lose some once in a while. It’s kind of dwindled down.  But in the last few years we haven’t dwindled any more. We manage to have enough children to keep going.”Most families, like Martin and his wife Sherry, are long-time ranchers in the area.  Their own three children, now adults, were raised attending St. James.Newcomers arrive now and then as old-time ranchers subdivide their sprawling holdings.  The smaller acreage is snatched up by those who may want a home in the country or a weekend getaway.The congregation is especially pleased to see a young family now attends St. James with their three children.Martin himself grew up a “chicken eating Methodist and my wife grew up a Baptist.  She wouldn’t give and I wouldn’t give so we ended up Episcopalians,” he said. “There was something that grabbed us about the Episcopal Church and we’ve been here ever since.”In an ironic twist, one of the Martin’s children is now a Methodist, one a Baptist and one an Episcopalian.St. James was served by supply priests until the minister at St. John’s in Sonora began going up to St. James, leading to the tradition of yoking the two parishes together under the same minister. Roque has served at St. James and St. John’s since 2008.If parishioners want to attend Sunday school, they drive down to St. John’s in Sonora.  That’s because St. James doesn’t have Sunday school, Bible studies or plethora of other activities that play a role at larger churches.“We miss Sunday school and things like that but at the same time we’ve grown up with a strong Sunday worship service,” Martin said.  “That’s what we’ve known and that’s what we’ve gotten used to.  I do miss the Sunday school part, but I have everything else here.”Smallness does have its virtue, Martin believes. When he’s visited larger churches, he wonders “how many of those people does that priest know personally?”“We love each other, we share with each other, we know each other very well,” Martin said. “Father Chris knows us very well.  We know everything about each other.”Martin paused. “For better or for worse.”After church, “we may hang around for an hour just chewing the fat with each other,” Martin said. Or they’ll pull out the folding chairs and tables and have a pot-luck lunch.“You don’t walk outside to a big old parking lot and find your car and you don’t know anyone’s name,” Martin said. “Gosh, we’re all old friends.”Over the years, “the chemistry of the church has changed,” he said. “When we pass the peace, we hug each other. In the old days, you’d just nod.”“Now we also have a priest,” he said.  “If we need him, we can call him.”Roque has taken to the area’s rich ranching culture and probably has the distinction of being the only priest in the diocese who helps his parishioners round up cattle.  “It also gives him a chance to meditate and pray,” Martin said.Members of the congregation have gone on mission trips to Costa Rica and Nicaragua and have sent veterinary and medical teams to Honduras.  One family has been actively involved in Cursillo and helped host an Ultreya at Fort McKavett.They are also involved with the diocese’s Good Samaritan Community Services and Martin himself volunteers with prison ministries.But they only had to look at the neighboring fort to come up with a novel idea for a new outreach program – star parties.Every quarter, amateur astronomers from Houston set up a dozen or so telescopes at Fort McKavett for visitors to gaze at distant plants, stars and galaxies.“We’re on top of a hill and you can see forever,” Martin said. “It’s one of the darkest places in North America.”Star gazers arrive in the late afternoon and stay until around 10 p.m.“There’s nothing out there to eat,” Roque said. “You can’t buy a Coke, you can’t buy a bag of chips. You get hungry.”“So we provided dinner for the star party,” Martin said.They cooked brisket, set out buns and all the trimmings and asked for donations to cover the meal.  They took in $300 and are “all hopped up to do it again,” Martin said.Roque’s attraction to Fort McKavett is rooted in his childhood. A native of New Braunfels, he was “born, raised, baptized and confirmed in the diocese.”He majored in history and attended seminary at Sewanee: The University of the South.When he was a youngster, his Boy Scout troop camped at Fort McKavett. Later, he joined Civil War and cavalry re-enactment groups that gathered at McKavett.“I’ve had a lot of ties and connections out here,” he said.  And in a twist of fate, “My favorite high school teacher is from here, she moved back home and now she attends church here.”His involvement in military re-enactments has morphed into another outreach at the fort. He volunteers as the post’s chaplain, sporting an historical accurate replica of an Army chaplain’s frock coat.Last summer, Fort McKavett held a summer camp that attracted about 40 children from across Texas. He held prayer services and talked about what the Army chaplain did on the frontier.During heritage days at McKavett, Roque conducts a Eucharist using the 1789 Book of Common Prayer, the version seen on the 1870s Texas frontier.“It’s a neat experience being able to be out here,” he said. “I realized that this is the type of ministry that I’m good at.  I go out on ranches, I work cattle with some of the ranchers, I still do my hospital visits and my pastoral care.”He’s also been a part-time police officer for more than 16 years.“I tease St. John’s in Sonora all the time,” Roque said. “I wouldn’t have come out here to St. John’s if it weren’t also for the call to St. James. They laugh because they knew how much I love St. James.”West Texans have always been known as a self-reliant and independent lot, a trait reflected at St. James.“St. James is a staunchly independent and self-reliant church,” Roque said.  If the diocese asks “if there is anything we can do for you, our members will say we’ve been around for over a hundred years.  Just give us a priest and we’ll be all right.”Martin echoed those sentiments: “As long as there’s a parish in Sonora, we’re on cloud nine. And as long as Father Chris is there, we’re on cloud nine.”— Mike Patterson is a member of St. Michael and All Saints Episcopal Church in Blanco, Texas. He writes regularly for The Church News, the newsletter of the Diocese of West Texas. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York michael Neal says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Patsy Barham+ says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Robin Rhyand says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Benjer McVeigh says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Tlhe Rev. Robert A. Terrill says: Rector Smithfield, NC January 30, 2012 at 9:59 am This is the church that I was raised in and it holds a very special place in my heart. Harold and I were married there July 23,1960 and had the pleasure of renewing our vows with Fr. Roque 50 years later. St. James will always be home no matter how far we are away. Thanks for the excellent article and thanks to the people of Ft. McKavett and the area for keeping the church in operation. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Collierville, TN Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books St. James, the smallest parish in the Diocese of West Texas Roots extend to U.S. Cavalry Fort Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Press Release January 26, 2012 at 9:22 pm Beautiful church building. Curate Diocese of Nebraska January 27, 2012 at 11:44 am Fr. Roque reminds us that ministry in farm and ranch country is great fun. 50 years ago my bishop assigned me to a small mission close to the tallgrass prairie in Kansas. Armed with prayerbook, a VW bug, I ventured forth to save the world. I strapped on a western belt that smelled like a new saddle, pulled on my spur ready cowboy boots, ordered a stetson from St. Joe, and togeher with my VW with a Blaupunkt radio, I looked like a combination of urban chic and John Wayne with a collar. I did my job; riding to tractors, bucking hay bales, sitting on a fence with ranchers spitting out tobacco like The Marlboro Man. I preached sermons that were too long and forced weekly Holy Communion down their throats (Morning Prayer was then the customary). Ah for the good old days. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Press Release Service Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Shreveport, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Martinsville, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit an Event Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Mary Louise Flutsch-Tucker says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Bath, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rev. Thom Lewis says: Mary Louise Flutsch-Tucker says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group January 28, 2012 at 8:54 am Enjoyed the article – thank you. Rector Belleville, IL Comments are closed. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab February 23, 2014 at 3:11 pm I was baptized, confirmed and married at St. James. All from 1939-1960. We even came back to St. James for our reaffirmation ceremony in 2010. Father Roque did the honors and we were so very blessed. The memories of St. James are so very important to me. My Grandparents – Bob and Mary Flutsch attended St. James for many years before I came into the picture. Thanks to the community for keeping this icon of history active today. We attend St. Peter and St. Paul in Mission, Tx. Father Roque has ties to the Valley too. Love to each of you. Mary Louise Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET January 25, 2012 at 2:37 pm I loved reading this article. It makes me want to go on a road trip this summer to visit St. James. Submit a Job Listing Comments (9) Featured Events July 13, 2016 at 12:05 am I really enjoyed the above article, it made me feel like was back in the “old west”…except for the mention of people arriving in vans, SUVs and pickup trucks; but you never know, someone just may come riding up on horseback…what a pleasant surprise that would be. Also, it sounds like I’ll have mighty big boots (and spurs) to fill this coming Sunday because I will be serving the congregation of St. James, no matter how small they may be. But after hearing about Fr. Roque, I’m almost afraid to show up. I’m Thom Lewis from San Angelo, TX, retired priest of the Episcopal Church, Diocese of NW Texas. I don’t ride and I don’t know nothin’ ’bout cattle round-ups. The little rock church looks charming and the people…well…welcoming. Rather like when I was a little boy dreaming about growing up out west, with my favorite western stars on the silver screen, instead of back east in the Furniture Capitol of the World, High Point, NC. As I grew older, I became disillusioned when I realized my “old west” heroes were a product of Hollywood; a place a little too far west to be real. However, I think that this Sunday will renew my delight in my western heroes meeting and celebrating the Holy Communion in the little stone church with real “old west” folk…thankful for who they are and how they came to be. Folks…looking forward to it. Oh…do you folks sing? Thom By Mike PattersonPosted Jan 23, 2012 February 2, 2012 at 5:12 pm Thank you, Michael, for writing such a great portrait of the small Episcopal Church-thriving and contributing in making a difference where planted. God bless you, my friend, Jimmy Martin and his family. God bless St. James Church, of West Texas, small in number, large in heart. In Christ Jesus.The Reverend Patsy G. BarhamPriest-in-chargeSt. Matthew’s Episcopal ChurchHenderson, Texas Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Dana Juett says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZlast_img read more

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New Director of Membership, Compliance and Professional Development at IoF

first_imgNew Director of Membership, Compliance and Professional Development at IoF  224 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis6 The Institute of Fundraising has a new Director of Membership, Compliance and Professional Development. Alex Xavier took up his new role at the professional body for fundraisers last week.He will be responsible for leading the Institute’s Academy, Compliance and Individual Membership teams. As well as increasing the body’s individual membership and developing its Academy training and development programme, he will also lead on embedding compliance and professional standards within the culture of the fundraising community in the UK.His appointment is part of the Institute’s efforts to achieving Chartered status.Xavier brings experience of leadership in both membership services and a professional body. He worked for the Chartered Institute for Securities & Investment, a global professional body of over 40,000 members, and Assistant Director of Member Services.Xavier said: “Joining the IoF’s senior leadership team is a fantastic opportunity for me, and I am looking forward to working with my new colleagues at the IoF to continuously improve and enhance our Academy and Compliance services, as well as drive the retention and acquisition of individual members.” AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis6 Howard Lake | 19 February 2018 | News Tagged with: compliance Institute of Fundraising Membership Recruitment / people  223 total views,  1 views today Advertisement About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Government criticised over Inishowen – Letterkenny bus service

first_img Twitter There are urgent calls on the Government to properly fund the Inishowen to Letterkenny bus service.As of today, a new operator is taking over most the route after North West Busways announced that it was to cease its operation; however some gaps in the service remain.People who regularly use the service are reportedly finding it difficult to access the service because the changes don’t cater to some areas.Donegal Senator Padraig MacLochlainn says public transport is virtually non existent on the peninsula and communities deserve better:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/padgfhgfhgfhgfbusweb.wav00:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. WhatsApp Google+ Pinterest RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR DL Debate – 24/05/21 WhatsApp Government criticised over Inishowen – Letterkenny bus service Facebook FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 Pinterestcenter_img AudioHomepage BannerNews Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic By News Highland – October 14, 2019 Google+ Harps come back to win in Waterford Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction Twitter Facebook Previous articleEmergency services attending crash on Donegal town by-passNext articleUpdate: Woman sustains minor injuries in Donegal crash News Highland News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th last_img read more

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Relay for Life campaign heads into stretch

first_imgLatest Stories Email the author Next Up“The theme for this year’s Relay for Life campaign is ‘Give Cancer the Boot,’” Brigham said. “In an effort to bring greater awareness to the ACS’ programs and services related to cancer prevention, we will have several informational/educational tents set up at Relay night May 1. To encourage people to stop and learn more about cancer prevention, cards will be available to be signed and stamped at each tent visited. Those cards will be entered into a drawing for two Southwest Airline tickets. The drawing for the free airline tickets will be held at Relay.”Ken Cox Ford in Troy is sponsoring a 50-50 raffle and tickets are available at Ken Cox Ford. The drawing for the raffle will be on April 23. Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson By Jaine Treadwell Print Article Relay for Life campaign heads into stretch Book Nook to reopen Published 4:00 am Thursday, April 9, 2015 Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day “There will be a telethon on the Mike Amos’ show, Today in LA, on April 27 and that should attract a lot of interest and be a lot of fun,” Brigham said.The annual Survivors’ Dinner will be at 6:30 p.m. April 28 in the Park Memorial United Methodist Church Family Life Center. All cancer survivors are invited to attend along with their caregiver. Reservations for the dinner may be made by calling Ashton Cravens at 334-482-4499.center_img By Secrets Revealed The countdown to the 2015 Pike County Relay for Life campaign has begun. The Relay for Life culminating event will be May 1 at the Troy Sportsplex with all Relay teams participating.Joy Brigham, community manager, Relay for Life Mid-South Division, American Cancer Society, said the Relay for Life teams are shifting into high gear for the final month of fundraising activities and events. April 24 has been designated as Paint the Town Purple Day and all businesses and homeowners are encouraged to purchase purple ribbons to be display on that day. Purple is the official color of the ACS Relay for Life campaign. Ribbons may be purchased by calling 334-790-0372. This Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s… Sponsored Content Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthRemember Them? I’m Sure Their New Net Worth Will Leave You SpeechlessbradofoThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel You Might Like Student serves Ivey as page Meredith Gramley thought she would like to have a career that placed her in a leadership role. After serving as… read more Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kitslast_img read more

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Cleveland Browns trade running back Carlos Hyde to Jacksonville Jaguars

first_imgOctober 19, 2018 /Sports News – National Cleveland Browns trade running back Carlos Hyde to Jacksonville Jaguars Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPhoto by Jason Miller/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — The Cleveland Browns are trading running back Carlos Hyde to the Jacksonville Jaguars, a source tells ESPN’s Adam Schefter.Hyde has rushed for 382 yards and five touchdown through Cleveland’s first six games. He will now help fill a hole for a Jacksonville team that has been without its star running back Leonard Fournette for much of the season.Fournette has already been ruled out for Sunday’s game against the Houston Texans. It will be the third consecutive game Fournette will not play.The move will give Browns rookie running back Nick Chubb more opportunities to show his talent. Chubb has tallied 173 yards and two touchdowns on just 16 carries this season. Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.center_img Beau Lundlast_img read more

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Top speakers for BSB event

first_imgBakery industry leaders are to address the British Society of Baking’s two-day Autumn Conference, from 8-9 October at Coombe Abbey Park Hotel, Coventry.Speakers at the event include Nigel Doughty, MD of bakery chain Paul UK, Tesco category manager Neil Franklin, Mathiesons Bakeries MD George Stevenson and food writer Tom Bridge, who will talk about Christmas sandwiches.Crumb Structure Formation in Burger Buns and Soft Rolls will be looked at by John Cottrell, technical manager of ADM Milling, and Bakels’ product development manager Gary Gibbs will look at healthy bakery products.The event starts with a medieval banquet on 8 October, with the conference held on 9 October.Peter Jones, MD of Speedibake, and Paul Molyneux, technical director at British Bakeries will be chairing the morning and afternoon sessions at the conference.The organisers are hoping for a record attendence. For bookings, call Sharon Byrne at Bakels on 01869 247098 by 1 October.last_img read more

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Bakers in 20% pasty tax Downing Street demonstration

first_imgMore than 500 bakers protested at Downing Street yesterday over the proposed 20% pasty tax and a petition with more than half a million signatures was handed to the government.The rally – which was organised by Greggs and the National Association of Master Bakers – heard Ken McMeikan, chief executive of Greggs, accuse the government of being out of touch on the matter.And, a delegation from Greggs and the NAMB visited parliament following the demonstration to voice their concerns with MPs.Addressing the crowd, McMeikan said: “My fellow bakers, I wish we were standing here together on Richmond Terrace in happier circumstances. The gravity of the situation that faces our industry must not, and can not, be underestimated. For generations those bakers that went before us have toiled to create a bakery industry that has been loved by customers for the craft bakery skills, affordability and delicious tasting food that only true bakers with real skill can create.“We come here today with peaceful intentions but resolute determination to fight to the bitter end this proposed tax that will have a devastating impact on ordinary people who simply can not afford to pay 20% more for every day food. This government are showing themselves to be out of touch; out of touch with ordinary hard working people; out of touch with the challenges facing High streets; out of touch with the poorest in this country that need higher aspiration and hope not higher prices.”NAMB director Christopher Beaney said: “They’ve changed the rules so that if someone comes into our shop and a tray of sausage rolls comes out of the oven, we’re not allowed to sell those sausage rolls unless we put VAT on them, or we say to them ‘hang on 10 minutes and you can have it without VAT. It’s going to be completely impossible to police.”And referring to a decisions by former Chancellor Nigel Lawson to not tax pies, McMeikan added: “What did he understand that George Osborne and The Treasury struggle to accept or choose to simply ignore? George Osborne and the Treasury claim they are trying to create a level playing field by introducing this VAT. But let me be clear, and I mean crystal clear, the playing field is already level. In fact it’s flat, completely horizontal. Why do I say this with confidence and certainty? I say it because where others, such as chip shops keep food hot they charge VAT. When we keep products hot we charge VAT, it’s a level playing field.”• See British Baker next week for a full report on the demonstration and for an update on where the campaign goes next. And you can sign the petition online here: http://epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/32044last_img read more

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Eric Church Cancels 25,000 Tickets Purchased By Scalpers

first_imgCountry music star Eric Church has been staunchly fighting against ticket scalping for years, but he’s made his biggest stride against them yet. In a bold move, Church voided 25,000 tickets that were purchased by scalpers, and will be reselling those tickets directly to his fans.In an AP interview, Church shows his passion for the issue. “They buy thousands of tickets across the U.S., not just mine, and they end up making a fortune,” Church said. “They use fake credit cards, fake IDs. All of this is fraud.”He’s particularly adamant about getting his tickets into the hands of his fans, and has tried numerous tactics over the years to do so. Everything from paperless tickets to fan clubs and more have certainly helped, but scalpers still find their way in.Meanwhile, Church has one of the top grossing tours in the country according to Pollstar, with an average ticket price of $60.67. His performances are marathon affairs, as he explains. “We’re doing 39-40 songs,” Church said. “I played three hours and forty minutes in Atlanta. I want the fans who are, by the last hour of the show, pulling me to the end.”Church also shows his disappointment over the lack of enforcement for the BOTS Act, which was signed into law by President Obama and criminalizes the use of ticket bot software. “They are not really backing it up with prosecuting these people,” Church said. “I don’t believe they will anytime soon.”Ticket scalping is particularly hard to enforce, and requires action on a case-by-case level in order to prove effective. If other artists take strides like Church, there may be room for reform after all.[H/T Billboard]last_img read more

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Orientation introduces transfer students to ND community

first_imgHearing “I have always wanted to go to Notre Dame” is not unusual on campus, but for senior Liz Hynes, who transferred to Notre Dame the fall of her sophomore year, this phrase has an entirely new meaning.“Coming to campus as a student for the first time is completely surreal,” Hynes said. “Among transfers, you’ve got a lot of lifelong dreamers who’ve had to wait for a second chance, so we’re doubly grateful.”Hynes said unlike typical undergraduate students, transfer students do not have the luxury of enjoying a full four years at Notre Dame. “Get out of bed every day. There will be days when you’re sick or exhausted, and you’ll be tempted to stay in bed for 12 to 24 hours,” she said. “Don’t do it.”Instead, Hynes said, she would advise new transfers to make the most of their time on campus.“We will never be this rich in time and opportunity again, where we can write for a newspaper and join student government and create art with our friends and study things we’ve always been curious about,” she said. “Life won’t always let us do all of these things at once. Life will make us choose. Don’t do that one second before you have to. Do everything. Get out of bed.”Junior Emily Schneider transferred last fall from Kansas State University, a school she said “could not have been more different than Notre Dame.”“I did not know what to expect from such a transition, but I immediately felt as if I belonged at Notre Dame and felt like a member of the Notre Dame family,” Schneider said.This year, Schneider, along with 24 other transfer students from previous years, will be leading the new transfers through their orientation process. “Transfer orientation helps so much and really helped me to feel like a second year student, instead of like a freshman again,” Schneider said. “It really helps students make strong friendships and bonds with other transfers in the same situation. I met some of my best friends during transfer orientation and could not be more grateful for the experience.”Instead of going through orientation with their respective dorms, transfers are divided up into small groups called “transfer families,” according to junior and transfer orientation leader Nick Olmanson. “The thing that I am most excited about is meeting all the new students in my transfer family. Leaders are grouped in twos and are combined with about six or seven new students to create a family,” Olmanson said. Olmanson said he hopes to be a good resource to his transfer family, even beyond orientation.“Last year my transfer family was pretty close. We organized dinners throughout the year and I hope to be able to build friendships like those,” he said. Transfer families tend to stay close, and Olmanson said several students from his transfer family went on to be co-rec flag football champions that year. “My transfer family was very influential for me and everyone I met got along great,” he said. “I remained close friends with them as the year went on. The leaders last year did a great job and my transfer parents specifically made me want to be a leader to give that great experience to the next transfer class.”Olmanson also said he encourages transfers to reach out to people in their dorms. “I am lucky to have a bunch of great guys living in my dorm as well.  I was able to meet them pretty early on in the year, so that made the transition easy,” Olmanson said. Hynes said the separation between the incoming freshmen and the transfer class is key. “While some other schools lump transfers in with incoming freshmen, Notre Dame keeps in mind that these students have already spent time in college and don’t need to start from square one,” Hynes said. “They’re already aces at college, otherwise they wouldn’t have been accepted as transfers. So we make sure they get an experience that assists specifically with their transition to Notre Dame.”Hynes described the welcome luncheon of transfer orientation as “the happiest room in the world.” “The energy that everyone’s sharing — the excitement, the anxiety, the relief at finally being here — it’s incredibly special,” Hynes said. Senior Jake Wagner, who transferred to Notre Dame for the 2014-2015 academic year, said he advises new transfer students not to get overwhelmed by the process. “I know I was very overwhelmed, and thought I wasn’t cut out for Notre Dame,” Wagner said. “Transferring to Notre Dame can be a very difficult transition for a lot of people, but things get better. Don’t forget that you have the transfer network here to help you.”Tags: Transfer, transfer orientation, Transfer-Olast_img read more

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