Omnicane Limited (MTMD.mu) HY2020 Interim Report

first_imgOmnicane Limited (MTMD.mu) listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius under the Food sector has released it’s 2020 interim results for the half year.For more information about Omnicane Limited (MTMD.mu) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Omnicane Limited (MTMD.mu) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Omnicane Limited (MTMD.mu)  2020 interim results for the half year.Company ProfileOmnicane Limited is a company headquartered in Mauritius and specialises in sugar milling and electricity production services. The company engages in the production and processing of sugar cane, electricity production, food crop, flower and venison production, vegetable, palm heart and fresh shrimp production. Omnicane ltd operates through its subsidiaries, Omnicane Milling Holdings (Mon Tresor) Limited, Omnicane Milling Holdings (Britannia Highlands) Limited, Floreal Limited, FAW Investment Limited, Exotic Exports Limited, Omnicane Logistic Operations Limited, Omnicane Thermal Energy Holdings (St Aubin) Limited, Omnicane Holdings (La Baraque) Thermal Energy Limited, Omnicane Milling Operations Limited and Omnicane Agricultural Operations Limited; all arranged under  sugar, energy, hospitality, and property segments. Omnicane Limited is listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius.last_img read more

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The AMC share price is flying: should I buy?

first_img Roland Head | Wednesday, 2nd June, 2021 | More on: AMC Looking for new share ideas?Grab this FREE report now.Inside, you discover one FTSE company with a runaway snowball of profits.From 2015-2019…Revenues increased 38.6%.Its net income went up 19.7 times!Since 2012, revenues from regular users have almost DOUBLEDThe opportunity here really is astounding.In fact, one of its own board members recently snapped up 25,000 shares using their own money… So why sit on the side lines a minute longer?You could have the full details on this company right now. Image source: Getty Images. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Roland Head has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Grab your free report – while it’s online. One FTSE “Snowball Stock” With Runaway Revenues The AMC share price is flying: should I buy?center_img Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. US cinema chain AMC Entertainment (NYSE: AMC) has seen its share price rise by 130% since 26 May. As this is a volatile, fast-moving stock, the picture may have changed by the time you read this. But as I write, AMC’s share price is up by a staggering 633% over the last year.On Tuesday, AMC raised $230m by selling new shares. The company plans to “go on the offence”, using the cash to buy small cinema chains that are in difficulties due to the pandemic. Does this optimistic outlook mean that there’s still time for me to consider buying AMC stock?5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…A quick flipBuying up smaller cinema operators could be a good way for AMC to boost its market share. The big chain will probably be able to operate the new cinemas at a lower cost than their previous owners.I think the outlook for AMC is probably better than I would have predicted a year ago. However, I do still have some concerns.In this week’s fundraising, hedge fund Mudrick Capital bought $230m of new shares from AMC at a share price of $27.12.News of the deal helped push the stock higher, as retail traders piled in. According to press reports, Mudrick had sold all of the new shares within a few hours, flipping the stock for a quick profit.Of course, there’s nothing wrong with this. But it does suggest to me that Mudrick Capital’s founder, Jason Mudrick, may not expect AMC shares to keep rising.Who owns AMC?Mudrick isn’t the only big investor who has been selling AMC stock. The cinema group’s top shareholder since its 2013 IPO has been China’s Wanda Group. But Wanda sold its remaining shares during the week ending 21 May.As far as I can tell, AMC doesn’t have any really big shareholders, except index tracker funds run by Vanguard and Blackrock’s iShares business. Index trackers can’t choose what to buy — they have to buy the stocks in the index they track.My analysis suggests that the vast majority of AMC shares, including those sold by Mudrick Capital, are now owned by private investors.AMC share price: buy, sell, or hold?To estimate a ‘back to normal’ valuation for entertainment businesses, I’m looking at companies’ earnings for the years before Covid-19. In this case, it looks like AMC may already have had problems before 2020.In 2018, the company reported a net profit of $110m. In 2019, costs rose, and AMC reported a loss of $149m.Assuming that AMC can return to 2018 levels of profitability, then at current levels the AMC share price values this business at around 92 times earnings.For me, that’s just too much. AMC’s tickets sales were flat from 2017 to 2019. I can’t see any reason to expect cinemas to return to rapid growth. In addition, AMC still has net debts of around $5bn, which cost $311m in interest last year.The latest broker forecasts also look downbeat — analysts expect the company to report further losses in 2021, 2022, and 2023.I could be wrong about this business. But in my view, AMC shares are overvalued. I won’t buy the shares and if I held them, I’d think about selling. See all posts by Roland Head Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Enter Your Email Addresslast_img read more

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5 years after Charleston massacre, killings of George Floyd, other…

first_img Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Liz Alston, church historian of Mother Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina, sits in the front row of the sanctuary after a Sunday morning service in October 2018. Photo: Reuters[Episcopal News Service] It’s been nearly four years since Grace Church Cathedral in Charleston, South Carolina, and its next-door neighbor, Mount Zion African Methodist Episcopal Church, first came together for a racial justice book study, but the chosen reading for the group’s June 2 meeting took a back seat to participants’ lived experiences.It was the study group’s first meeting since vast protests erupted in Charleston and around the country following the May 25 killing of George Floyd by white police officers in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Those events were still unfolding as the 60 or so participants joined the online meeting hosted by the two churches.“It’s been an emotionally tough week. Living under the burden of racism is tough,” Tonnia Switzer told the group.Grace, a mostly white Episcopal congregation, began the book study group in response to the June 17, 2015, massacre by a white supremacist of nine members of Mother Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church during a Bible study at the Charleston church. Two months earlier, a North Charleston police officer had shot and killed Walter Scott, an unarmed black motorist. The killings sent shockwaves through Charleston and ignited a national conversation about the legacy of slavery and the Confederacy and the systemic racism built into American institutions from the nation’s founding.With the city approaching five years since the massacre, Charleston was among the locations where violent unrest marred otherwise peaceful protests the weekend after Floyd’s killing. Graphic cellphone video footage of the killing fueled national outrage. The video showed Minneapolis police pinning Floyd, an unarmed black man, to the ground for nearly nine minutes, with one officer’s knee pressed against Floyd’s neck as he pleaded, “I can’t breathe.”The killing thrust discussions of race and policing to the forefront of America’s consciousness, though people of color have long been victims of police brutality and white vigilantism, even before Floyd’s death. “It certainly reminded me and haunted me afresh,” the Rev. Kylon Middleton, senior pastor of the historically black Mount Zion, told the book study group on June 2.This meeting, like others in recent weeks, convened online because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Middleton and the Ven. Callie Walpole, the cathedral’s vicar and subdean, allowed Episcopal News Service to observe the June 2 Zoom session.Since forming in September 2016, as Charleston gunman Dylann Roof’s federal trial was about to get underway, the group has read and discussed together more than two dozen race-related books. After recent discussions of Ta-Nehisi Coates’ “Between the World and Me,” the group on June 2 broke from its normal format to allow participants to share their thoughts on systemic racism and recent events.Abe Jenkins participates by cellphone video in the June 2 book study discussion on Zoom.“I think this topic is something that all, throughout the world, people have on their minds,” said Abe Jenkins, grandson of civil rights activist Esau Jenkins. “Before we can ever reconcile racial relations, we’ve got to first acknowledge that the problem exists and have a conversation about it.”After 400 years of oppression, those are difficult conversations for African Americans to initiate with their white neighbors, Middleton said. Some in the white community resist calls for change by saying instead the descendants of slaves should simply get over it, an attitude that Middleton suggested is driven by fear rather than facts.Middleton was a close friend of the Rev. Clementa Pinckney, pastor of Mother Emanuel, who was gunned down by Roof along with the eight others from the congregation. In January 2017, a federal jury sentenced an unrepentant Roof to death for the rampage.In May 2017, Michael Slager, the former North Charleston police officer, pleaded guilty to fatally shooting Scott in the back during a traffic stop for a broken taillight. A judge later sentenced Slager to 20 years in prison.Three years later, a series of incidents in Georgia, Kentucky and Minnesota have become flashpoints for a new wave of protests against racial injustice. In addition to Floyd’s killing, they include the February killing of Ahmaud Arbery, a black jogger by a white father and son in Georgia, and the March killing of Breonna Taylor, a black woman fatally shot by police during a raid of her home in Kentucky.“Just being black, period – it’s almost like living while black – you have [white] individuals who are automatically afraid,” Middleton said. He told the story of visiting a parishioner in a hospital. While riding the elevator up, his mind was on finding the patient’s room, until he noticed a white woman next to him, cowering and clutching her purse.“You never really forget it. You never really get over it,” he said.The Rev. Kylon Middleton, senior pastor of Mount Zion African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina, speaks during the June 2 Zoom session of the book study he co-leads.Switzer, echoing other black participants in the meeting, said white acquaintances in recent days had expressed sympathy to her, saying they’ve followed news of the protests after Floyd’s killing and didn’t realize how seriously black Americans still feel the sting of racism – “we didn’t know it was that bad.”To that, Switzer didn’t hide her disbelief: “Are you living under a rock?”Amid racial justice protests, reading group pauses to share reactionsIn the days leading up to the June 2 book study, daily peaceful protests had given way overnight to rioting and looting in Charleston. “We had protests, we had curfews, we had riots, we had vandalism, and it was just awful,” Middleton told ENS. He and other faith leaders had been working long hours to promote peace and prayer during the protests and to help to clean up their neighborhoods afterward.Since that first weekend, violence in Charleston has subsided, according to the Post and Courier, as demonstrators continue to call for criminal justice reforms and greater police accountability. That spirit of engagement enlivened the churches’ book study.“I’m not surprised that we have a large group tonight,” Walpole said as she and Middleton welcomed participants.White participants outnumbered black participants by about three to one, but at one point, Walpole, who also serves as archdeacon of the Diocese of South Carolina, urged those white participants to hold off speaking so they could listen to others’ perspectives on what had been happening in their community and around the country after Floyd’s killing.“It reminded me so much of Emmett Till, whistling or whatever to a white woman,” Jenkins told the group. That was Mississippi in 1955, and the 14-year-old Till met the same fate. “They killed him.”He added that this younger generation of black activists is different, not afraid of police, not afraid of talking back, not even afraid of dying while fighting for change. “People are just fed up,” Jenkins said. He doesn’t want rioting to distract from what the peaceful protests are really about. “The core problem is the injustice.”What can white people of faith do to help? Get the facts about what is going on in the country, Switzer said. She usually tries not to make waves on Facebook, but she has begun posting links for white friends about how to become an anti-racist.“I need you to do the work,” she said. “I need you to get up and speak.”Defensive reactions like “I’m not a racist” aren’t helpful, said Gail DeCosta, a black Episcopalian who serves on the vestry at Grace. “That’s just too easy to say. People have got to be made to be aware they’re doing racist things, whether they think they’re racist or not.”Liz Alston, a member of Mother Emanuel, suggested that white neighbors who aren’t sure how best to support racial healing shouldn’t feel discouraged from the work. “Start slow, but do something,” she said. Write a letter to the editor. Start a conversation in the neighborhood. Confront a relative who has expressed racist views.“I’m not saying it’s easy,” she said, “but black life isn’t easy either and we have stood up.”After massacre, growing momentum for reexamining America’s racial historyIn 2015, Charleston was the flashpoint. The massacre at Mother Emanuel dominated national news. Walpole said some members of her congregation and other nearby Episcopal churches began opening their eyes to the prevalence and nature of racism that still existed in their community and the country.“The way I describe it is, any veneer that might have existed was stripped away by the massacre, and we realized we had to be in relationship with one another and in conversation with one another,” Walpole said in an interview with ENS before the June 2 session.But up to that point, there had been little relationship or conversation between Grace and Mount Zion, Middleton told ENS. With their churches separated only by a chest-high white wall and Grace’s parking lot, the congregations mostly kept to themselves. In the 1970s and 1980s, “I definitely couldn’t go into Grace Church when I was a boy growing up,” said Middleton, now 48. In the ensuing years, the congregations made occasional attempts to come together, such as at joint Pentecost services, but those efforts didn’t go much further.Conditions slowly began to change in 2015. After Roof’s arrest, details of his fondness for the Confederate flag prompted some Southern leaders to order an end to displaying the flag at statehouses and other public places, a sudden and dramatic reversal after years of resistance to calls for the flag’s removal. Five years later, American institutions still face pressure to curtail public display of the flag and other Confederate symbols.The massacre also inspired action by The Episcopal Church’s General Convention. Meeting a month after the attack, bishops and deputies passed a resolution condemning the Confederate battle flag as “at odds with a faithful witness to the reconciling love of Jesus Christ.” That month, General Convention also elected the church’s first black presiding bishop, the Most Rev. Michael Curry, and it established racial reconciliation as one of the church’s top priorities, along with evangelism and creation care. Two years later, the church would introduce its cornerstone initiative on race, Becoming Beloved Community.At Grace, founded in 1846, work toward racial healing was just getting off the ground in September 2016. Walpole said some members of her congregation expressed interest in probing difficult issues of race and the history of slavery, by reading and discussing books on the topic. The aim wasn’t to guilt white members for the sins of their ancestors, “but simply to allow our eyes to be opened and see where we might have been blind before,” she said.They started with Michelle Alexander’s influential “The New Jim Crow,” which makes the case that oppression of black Americans, far from ending with slavery and segregation, has evolved into a new racial caste system centered around mass incarceration. A 2015 General Convention resolution recommended the book by name.Since then, the book study group has read and discussed Toni Morrison’s “The Origin of Others,” Jon Meacham’s “The Soul of America,” Henry Louis Gates’ “Stony the Road” and C. Vann Woodward’s “The Strange Career of Jim Crow,” among other books, as well as Paul’s letter to Philemon, for a biblical reading on slavery.“We take our time with these books,” Walpole said, sometimes analyzing just a chapter at a time. Every Tuesday at 5 p.m. year-round, all are invited to the cathedral for the hourlong discussion, even if they haven’t read the week’s assignment.Walpole, who grew up just outside Charleston on Johns Island, initially thought the book study would only draw five or six people, but it has grown to a regular turnout of 40 to 60 participants, with an even larger crowd when visited by a guest speaker, such as the mayor or police chief. On those occasions, the group often bonds over a dinner of okra soup, a Southern dish that Walpole says is “what you serve your family.”Many of the participants are from Grace and Mount Zion, but it also draws people from other congregations, a mix of local Episcopal churches, as well as AME churches and other historically black congregations.“What has occurred is more than we ever imagined,” Walpole said, and even more important now, with the country intensely focused on racial justice issues. “I feel there are people across the church and the country that are maybe ready to have these conversations.”The Ven. Callie Walpole, vicar and subdean of Grace Church Cathedral in Charleston, South Carolina, is a co-leader of the book study group that meets Tuesday evenings at the cathedral. Its gatherings have been held online during the coronavirus pandemic.Middleton, a Charleston native, has been senior pastor at Mount Zion since November 2015. He wasn’t involved in the book study from the start, but a white member of Mount Zion who had begun attending asked Middleton to come along in fall 2016. At the time, he felt exhausted after long days at the federal court with relatives of Roof’s victims observing his monthslong jury selection, trial and sentencing. “The last thing I wanted to do was come to a book study talking about race relations,” he said.But one Tuesday evening, he dropped by Grace Church Cathedral. The group was still discussing “The New Jim Crow.” Middleton came and sat in a seat along the wall. He kept silent.“They’re reading this book, but they don’t really have the context,” Middleton recalled thinking. The black perspective was missing, he said, and the difference between white and black experiences left him bewildered.After the hour, he went home. “And I never intended to come back,” he said.Middleton returned anyway and now leads the group with Walpole. He told ENS that he was compelled by a desire to help the group of white Christians expand its perspective, to think differently about the black experience and “the stain that continues to penetrate every area and facet of society because we have never fully dealt with the institution of slavery and the aftermath thereof.”He had read “The New Jim Crow” but had not studied it in an academic way, like the group was. He went back and read the book again so he would be prepared to discuss it with them.“I have lived this,” he said. “I didn’t need to study it. But I do need to study your perspective.”Difficult conversations, but ‘we have to keep talking about it’In June 2015, Middleton was serving as pastor of a different AME congregation about 60 miles away in Georgetown when he got word of the massacre in Charleston. The call came from the wife of Pinckney, the Mother Emanuel pastor. She told Middleton he should come to Charleston immediately. He arrived that evening.Pinckney and Middleton grew up together. They didn’t live in the same community – Pinckney was originally from Ridgeland – but they became close while attending AME youth group events together. As adults, each served as godfather to the other’s children. Pinckney “was like a brother to me,” Middleton said.The killings left a wound of grief that has yet to heal fully, and Middleton is surrounded by reminders. “It never goes away,” Middleton said. “There’s always a story that comes back up. … It’s more than just a story in the news. It’s personal.”Middleton said he and other black participants also sometimes feel ambivalence and weariness toward talking about racism with their white counterparts.“It’s a hard thing to keep talking about,” Middleton told ENS. “Sometimes, my members become extremely exhausted because you’re living this every day, so you don’t want to keep talking about it every day.”But Middleton, who initially thought he’d never return, now has the 5 p.m. hour on Tuesdays blocked off every week in his calendar. He’s always there, even though the discussion may prove frustrating or bring up painful memories.“We have to keep talking about it,” he said, particularly with white listeners “who are willing to talk about it and be moved into a position of empathy and understanding and awareness.” Even when someone in the book study mentions the nine people killed at Mother Emanuel, “I don’t like hearing about it, but every time I hear about it, it makes me want to do something else to make sure their lives were not lost in vain.”Like Grace Church Cathedral, The Episcopal Church’s membership is overwhelmingly white – 90 percent white, according to the Pew Research Center. But among the subset of cathedral parishioners and other white participants who choose to attend the book study, Middleton and Walpole can challenge them to reconsider their assumptions on matters of race.The sessions can be “grueling” but still worthwhile, Walpole said. Middleton, too, is dedicated to this work, even when he doesn’t enjoy it.A few months ago, a white member of the group stood up and declared herself to be a racist, a moment of public confession and self-examination that Middleton likened to a scene from an Alcoholics Anonymous meeting. The woman later asked Middleton how he felt attending the book study.“It feels like, when I come here for one hour, it’s almost like being waterboarded,” Middleton said. “For me, it’s torture.”It was not until Floyd’s killing that he fully understood why. His epiphany, he said, was embedded in a metaphor used by the Rev. Al Sharpton in his June 4 eulogy for Floyd to describe black Americans’ centuries of struggle within a dominant white culture.It can feel like you’re drowning, Middleton told ENS. It can feel like you’re trying to come up for air, trying to affirm your own experience, to explain so others will understand. The body is present, but it can feel like the emotional dynamic is somehow divorced from the physical. It can feel like to survive each moment requires compartmentalizing thoughts and feelings, constantly attentive to what is said and left unsaid.And it can feel like someone is pressing his knee into your neck.“When George Floyd was on the ground … that’s exactly the black experience,” Middleton said, echoing Sharpton. “The proverbial knee has been on our neck in so many ways, to oppress, repress, restrict and just marginalize us forever in this country.“So, I get it. I cannot breathe.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Racial Justice & Reconciliation Rector Bath, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Press Release Service Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Belleville, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Jobs & Calls Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem center_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Tampa, FL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET By David PaulsenPosted Jun 10, 2020 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY 5 years after Charleston massacre, killings of George Floyd, other black victims resound in churches’ multiracial book study Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Albany, NY Submit a Press Release George Floyd, Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit an Event Listing Tags Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TNlast_img read more

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Mortgage Rates Remain Above 4%

first_img* The above mortgage loan information is provided to, or obtained by, Bankrate. The rate is based on 30 year fixed rate mortgage and a loan of $300,000. Pinnacle National Bank4.147% UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 BankRate Community First Bank4.153% Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter TAGSMortgage Previous articleApopka residents ask for answers on wastewater facilityNext articleA guide to Inauguration Day Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Fifth Third4.275% Please enter your name here At the beginning of 2017, there was good news in regards to mortgage rates. After 9 consecutive weeks of rising mortgage rates, the rate finally fell. However, at 4.2%, the rate is still higher than economists would like to see.Sean Becketti, chief economist with Freddie Mac, said that this was the first time since 2014 that mortgage rates opened the year above 4% (Source).The current rate is somewhere between 4.125% and 4.25%, reports mortgagenewsdaily.com. The mortgage website goes on to explain that rates have risen .125% this week. Although .125% doesn’t seem like a big number, the biggest issue is the closing costs for borrowers wishing to lock in the lower rates from earlier in the week. ” On average, you’d need to pay an extra $650-750 (per $100k financed) upfront to lower your rate by .125%.  In that sense, if you opted not to lock a $300k loan on Wednesday, the past 2 days cost $1950-$2250,” writes Matthew Graham with mortgagenewsdaily.com.Here’s a look at the mortgage rates from July 30, 2016 through mid-January 2017.Here’s a look at local mortgage rates: Regions Bank4.277% …But finally drop after 9 weeks of increases Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Please enter your comment! Citizens Bank4.278% You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

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SEPTA riders launch free fare campaign in Philly

first_imgHanding out hundreds of “SEPTA Inconvenience Passes” (SIP) to passersby at a Nov. 7 press conference outside SEPTA headquarters, community activists called on the company to compensate riders for lost access to transportation during the six-day transit strike. SEPTA is the public transportation agency for 3.9 million people in and around PhiladelphiaThe Transit Riders Initiative demanded SEPTA honor the SIP passes with free rides for the strike days and refunds on monthly transit cards. In front of a giant SIP pass, spokesperson Erica Mines told the media, “If formal steps are not made to negotiate with riders and provide free rides, these passes will be used in lieu of fares once service is restored.”The newly formed group wants SEPTA management held accountable for neglecting to address worker needs in a timely manner, failing to negotiate in good faith with workers and forcing the strike.“The responsibility of accepting this cost falls on the administration, not the workers,” Mines stated. “SEPTA management intentionally stalled negotiations to intentionally use public inconvenience from the strike to force workers into sacrificing vital demands.”The SEPTA drivers, clerks and maintenance workers of Transportation Workers Union Local 234 struck Nov. 1 after trying for two years to get a fair contract from management. Key sticking points were worker pensions, health benefits and healthier working conditions.A Transit Riders Initiative press release noted: “The transit workers’ demands are basic rights that all workers should be entitled to. Sacrificing these demands lowers the minimum expectations for employers across the board, from city workers to nonunion workers.”At the press conference, community activist Deandra Jefferson called out SEPTA for putting “capitalist greed” ahead of workers’ need and communities relying on public transit. Around 800,000 riders, including 52,000 students, use SEPTA’s buses, trains and trolleys every weekday. Jefferson pointed out that if these riders had refused to go to work or school in support of the TWU strike, SEPTA would have settled on day one.On Nov. 4, SEPTA officials sought an injunction to force workers back to work. Management’s smokescreen for gouging workers was to pit them against riders by claiming concern about the “health, safety and welfare of the public” who ride SEPTA.It’s unlikely those riders include many of the fifteen SEPTA board members. Only four are from Philadelphia, including Pennsylvania state Rep. Dwight Evans, whose benefits include a state vehicle. The makeup of the board is controlled by the state legislature.Spokesperson Erica Mines stated: “Like all workers, SEPTA drivers and support staff have a right to decent wages, benefits and safety. The people also have a right to safe, efficient and affordable public transit. We ask SEPTA to authorize use of the free Inconvenience Passes and for drivers to accept the passes out of respect for community sacrifices during the strike.”The press conference was covered by three television stations and newspaper reporters, including the Philadelphia Daily News and Inquirer. As the event wound down, SEPTA management again demonstrated “concern” for riders by sending out uniformed transit police to harass the protesters.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Free expression and anti-corruption groups hold London vigil for murdered journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia

first_img RSF_en News October 23, 2017 Find out more November 2, 2017 Free expression and anti-corruption groups hold London vigil for murdered journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia United KingdomMaltaEurope – Central Asia Protecting journalists Organized crimeCorruptionImpunityPredatorsViolenceFreedom of expression November 2, 2017 Find out more United KingdomMaltaEurope – Central Asia Protecting journalists Organized crimeCorruptionImpunityPredatorsViolenceFreedom of expression to go further London, 2 November 2017. Today, on the International Day to End Impunity for Crimes Against Journalists, around 60 free expression advocates, anti-corruption activists, and other supporters gathered in London to honour the courage of investigative journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia, and call for justice in her case. “For decades, leading investigative journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia fought courageously to uncover corruption in her native Malta, in spite of ongoing intimidation, threats, lawsuits and attacks on her family home. Following her brutal murder, it is crucial that we come together to pay tribute to her bravery, to call for a full and impartial investigation, and to continue her legacy”, said Cat Lucas, Writers at Risk Programme Manager for English PEN. “Daphne Caruana Galizia embodied the courage and commitment of independent journalists everywhere to bring us the news and illuminate inconvenient truths at great risk. Her cowardly murder must not go unpunished. Today we stand with Caruana Galizia’s family, friends, and colleagues, in the pledge to seek justice for her and for all journalists who have paid the ultimate price simply for doing their job”, said Nina Ognianova, Europe and Central Asia Programme Coordinator for the Committee to Protect Journalists. In Malta, RSF urges EU to back campaign for journalists’ safety Organisation Co-sponsors of the London vigil included ARTICLE 19, the Committee to Protect Journalists, English PEN, Frontline Club, Index on Censorship, PEN International, Reporters Without Borders, and Transparency International. Malta is ranked 47th out of 180 countries in Reporters Without Borders’ 2017 World Press Freedom Index, and 47th out of 176 countries in Transparency International’s Corruption Perception Index 2016. “We are shocked and saddened at the death of Daphne Caruana Galizia. It’s important and necessary that we acknowledge her today and moving forward to pay tribute to her bravery in fighting corruption in her country. Her tragic death will serve as a stark reminder of the dangers journalists around the world face every day in doing their important work”, said Laura Gane, Editorial Director of the Frontline Club.center_img News News Help by sharing this information Follow the news on Europe – Central Asia Caruana Galizia was tragically killed on 16 October when a bomb placed under her car exploded as she drove away from her home in Bidnija, in the north of the island of Malta. A specialist in investigating corruption, her work included exposés of the shady secret deals, uncovered in the Panama Papers, that show how politicians and others hide illicit wealth behind secret companies. Her allegations about government corruption led to early elections in the country last June. News Investigative journalism’s uncertain future in Malta “The murder of a prominent investigative journalist in broad daylight in an EU Member State underscores the seriousness of this crime. Daphne Caruana Galizia’s work as a journalist to hold power to account and shine a light on corruption is vital to maintaining our democratic institutions. Her killing is a loss for her country and for Europe”, said Hannah Machlin, Project Manager for Index on Censorship’s Mapping Media Freedom programme. Receive email alerts “Daphne Caruana Galizia showed remarkable courage in relentlessly pursuing investigations into official corruption and publishing stories that some clearly wanted to keep hidden, for which she paid the ultimate price. We call for justice for Daphne, and for an end to the vicious cycle of violence against journalists and impunity for their attackers everywhere it occurs. An attack on a journalist anywhere is an attack on journalism itself”, said Rebecca Vincent, UK Bureau Director for Reporters Without Borders. “Daphne Caruana Galizia was a lone but important voice, and her death leaves a void in a country that urgently needs to address the growing widespread perception that it is failing in its efforts to end corruption”, said Patricia Moreira, Managing Director of Transparency International. Malta: Call for full investigation into Maltese blogger’s murder Press contacts: Rebecca Vincent, Reporters Without Borders at 07583 137751 or [email protected]; Katie Morris, ARTICLE 19 at 020 7324 2525 or [email protected]; Cat Lucas, English PEN at [email protected]; Hannah Machlin, Index on Censorship at 07447 579882 or [email protected]; and Dominic Kavakeb, Transparency International at 020 3096 7695, 07964 560340, or [email protected] October 17, 2017 Find out morelast_img read more

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IMRO in court bid to stop Limerick bar playing music

first_imgEmail Linkedin Advertisement TAGScopyrightCourtfeaturedfull-imageIMROinjunctionLimerick barroyalties No vaccines in Limerick yet Man charged with assault causing harm to shop worker after arrest on suspicion of coughing on victim Walk in Covid testing available in Limerick from Saturday 10th April NewsIMRO in court bid to stop Limerick bar playing musicBy Staff Reporter – December 18, 2013 1220 27 month delay in justice at Limerick courts Twittercenter_img Previous articleRegeneron to overhaul former Dell site and create 300 Limerick jobsNext articleCity council backing for historic commercial rate Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Print WhatsApp Andrew CareySign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up [email protected], the Irish Music Rights Organisation, is seeking a court injunction against the owners of a Limerick bar from playing any kind of music at its premises, recorded or live, for alleged breaches of music copyright and the non payment of royalties.Bourkes Bar and its named operator, Lorcan Bourke, was granted a music licence in March 2011 where the bar is permitted to play music at its venue.However, as IMRO sought an injunction at Limerick Circuit Court this week to prevent the owners playing music, the court was told that the licence was revoked on May 1st last for alleged non payment of royalties and breach of copyright act.According to papers filed to support the injunction application, IMRO claim that Bourkes Bar defaulted on the payment of royalties to the tune of over €4,100.IMRO is a national organisation that administers the performing right in copyright music in Ireland on behalf of its members (who are songwriters, composers and music publishers) and on behalf of the songwriters, composers and music publishers of the international overseas societies that are affiliated to it.Under the copyright legislation, royalties must be paid to the copyright holders for all all public performances of theri work be it live or recorded.Counsel for IMRO, Faye Revington BL, told the court that the licence was granted in March 2011 and thus granted the owners the right to play music. Royalty fees would be paid in lieu.Ms Revington outlined to Judge Moran that demands for payment were made in January and February of this year before the licence was revoked.In July, a civil equity bill was furnished to the owners of Bourkes seeking further demand for the monies and Ms Revington added that in October, notice was also served that proceedings were being initiated.Andrew Darcy, for the respondents, told the court that he would need until the end of next January to collate the defence. He said that his client had a defence to the amount of money alleged to be owed.Ms Revington claimed that music was still being played at the venue despite the absence of a licence and said that she was instructed to immediately seek the injunction from them continuing to do so.Judge Moran said that he would grant Mr Darcy time to gather the defence but said that the matter would be heard in full on the next date. The motion was adjourned until January 28 next. Rape Crisis welcomes publication of O’Malley report Facebook Man arrested after suspected gun and ammunition found following pursuit of car in Limericklast_img read more

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‘Portrayal Of Conflicts Between Communities Not An Offence’ : Journalist Patricia Mukhim Seeks Quashing Of FIR; SC Reserves Judgment

first_imgTop Stories’Portrayal Of Conflicts Between Communities Not An Offence’ : Journalist Patricia Mukhim Seeks Quashing Of FIR; SC Reserves Judgment Srishti Ojha16 Feb 2021 6:45 AMShare This – xThe Supreme Court on Tuesday reserved its judgement in the petition filed by Shillong Times Editor Patricia Mukhim challenging the refusal of the Meghalaya High Court to quash criminal proceedings against her over a Facebook post on violence against non-tribal people in State. A division Bench of Justice Nageswara Rao and Justice Ravindra Bhat heard arguments advanced by…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Supreme Court on Tuesday reserved its judgement in the petition filed by Shillong Times Editor Patricia Mukhim challenging the refusal of the Meghalaya High Court to quash criminal proceedings against her over a Facebook post on violence against non-tribal people in State. A division Bench of Justice Nageswara Rao and Justice Ravindra Bhat heard arguments advanced by the Petitioner and the state. During the hearing today, Advocate Vrinda Grover appearing on behalf of the petitioner narrated the background of the case. A complaint was made against the post by Dorbor Shnong, a community in the East Khasi Hills, on 6th July and FIR was filed on 7th July. However, Grover alleged that the contents of her post were edited and words were replaced placed before the police. One extract was selectively placed before the police instead of the entire post. With regards to the Mukhim’s facebook post, Grover submitted that the intention of the post was not to create any disharmony, but was in fact precisely the opposite. The post did not call upon two communities or groups, but called upon the Chief Minister and Director General of Police instead, while condemning the atrocities committed on the minority. “The Facebook post is only making a comment that non tribal boys have been targeted violently and State must ensure that it doesn’t happen. Why do i call on the Dorbor Shnong? Because communities have a social influence and i wanted that the black sheep of the community are called out. ” Mukhim’s Counsel stated.According to Grover, the portrayal of skirmish between two groups is not prohibited and is permitted. Therefore if there is any a controversy between two groups, any journalist would write about that. Senior Advocate Vrinda Grover relied on several judgements of the Supreme Court including the case of Manzoor Sayyed Khan vs State of Maharashtra, and how the law related to Section 153 A was interpreted by the Court. She stated that in the case of Ramesh vs Union of India, that dealt with the issue around TV serial Tamas, it was held that TV serial Tamas did not depict communal violence and therefore would not fall under section 153 A. Even in the recent judgement in the case of Amish Devgan judgement the threshold and bar as to what speech would not be protected was clarified. Relying on these judgements, petitioner’s Counsel submitted that what needs to be seen is what was said in the post and what was the intent and purpose of purpose of saying that. She clarified that in the impugned post, attention of the Stature Authorities including the CM and DGP was drawn by the petitioner to ensure that violence and attacks on community came to an end. The petitioner was fulfilling her responsibility as a Senior Journalist and as a responsible citizen “I’m exhorting everyone to rise beyond their caste and communities. I am not talking about any 2 communities here! I am fulfilling my responsibility as a senior journalist and as a responsible citizen.” Vrinda Grover statedAdvocate Avijit Mani Tripathi appearing on behalf of the State submitted that the fact that the petitioner is a well know journalist is relevant as in that case the possible and probable effect of her actions would be high. With respect to the incident that Mukhim’s post had discussed, Mr Tripathi added that action was being taken and everything was being done. FIRs were being filed. Advocate Tripathi submitted that it id expected of a journalist of that repute to ascertain the facts before writing something, that too when she has so many followers. A communal colour was given to an incident which was a small scuffle between two guys, which the police was already investigating. “Mr Tripathi please don’t go all over the place. Just tell us why ingredients of 153A are not made out. We know we have limited jurisdiction in the case ” – the Bench stated.The Bench observed that for quashing of FIR, the test adopted by the Court is to take allegations of complaint as they are without seeing defence of the accused. If the allegations don’t make an offence under the section then the FIR is quashed. “We know we cannot interfere in matters of FIR but you should atleast make a case, and not just read out judgement. We understand your point that she has to be more responsible, but you need to make a case as to how Section 153A would apply” the Bench stated.A three- Judge Bench of the Apex Court comprising of Justices L. Nageswara Rao, Indu Malhotra and Vineet Saran had on January 13,2021 issued notice in on a Special Leave Petition filed by Patricia Mukhim, Editor of Shillong Times, against the judgement of Meghalaya High Court which had refused to quash criminal proceedings under Sections 153A, 500 and 505(c) of the Indian Penal Code against her. The plea had contended that the Meghalaya High Court had passed an erroneous order wherein it had ignored settled precedent and declined to exercise powers vested in in under Section 482 Cr.PC.. The High Court allegedly allowed “victimisation, persecution, abuse of process of law and also stifling of the fundamental rights of the Petitioner under Articles 19(1)(a) and 21 of the Constitution of India by dismissing Mukhim’s challenge to the FIR. According to the Petitioner, she is facing a persecution for speaking the truth and seeking enforcement of rule of law against perpetrators of hate crime, in exercise of her fundamental right as guaranteed under Article 19(1)(a) of the Constitution of India. A plain reading of the her Facebook post makes it clear that the intent and purpose of this post is to appeal for impartial enforcement of rule of law; equal treatment before the law of all citizens; condemnation of targeted violence against members of a minority group; an end to impunity for violence and thereby ensure peace and harmony between communities and groups.The plea was filed through Advocate Prasanna S. and drafted by Advocate Soutik Banerjee.Click Here To Download Order[Read Order]Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

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Brood reduction in the Blue-eyed Shag Phalacrocorax atriceps

first_imgBrood reduction is common in a population of Blue‐eyed Shags on Signy Island, South Orkney Islands. This paper describes possible adaptations which may reduce the brood. In clutches of three, the last egg was smaller, and hatched 2.4 days later than its siblings. Whilst 78–84% of first and second (‘A’ & ‘B’) chicks fledged, only 11 % of ‘C’ chicks did. In a sample of artificially synchronized broods chick survival was as high as in normal asynchronously hatching broods, but there were more cases of total brood loss. The age at which the C chick died was related inversely to the length of the A‐C hatching interval. Relative differences in sibling weights were highest during the first 12 days, when most of the C chick deaths occurred. At this age the daily food requirements of each brood of three was one‐tenth that of each brood of two just prior to fledging. It is suggested that C chicks were unable to compete effectively for a food supply which was limited by the parents, rather than by the environment. The asymptotic weight attained by A chicks was inversely related to brood size, and was greater than that of B or C chicks. Normal asynchronous broods produced at least one heavy (A) chick and one medium weight (B) chick, whilst in synchronized broods the asymptotic weight attained was similar to that of B chicks in normal broods.last_img read more

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London Rental Standard faces Khan ‘review’

first_imgBoris Johnson’s flagship London Rental Standard (LRS) scheme has a less certain future after Sadiq Khan’s team confirmed to The Negotiator that it is now ‘under review’ with a decision on its future likely ‘very soon’.The LRS is already on shaky ground. Soon after coming to office Khan released papers revealing that City Hall officials warned Boris Johnson back in 2013 that the scheme’s target to sign up 100,000 landlords was “unrealistic and unachievable”.Launched in May 2014 it is supposed to enable tenants to ‘rent with confidence’ and give landlords ‘peace of mind’ and has the strong support of the industry including the Association of Residential Letting Agents, whose parent organisation NFoPP runs the accreditation programme for ARLA agents wanting to join.The LRS originally brought seven landlord accreditation schemes across London under one roof but was a voluntary scheme for letting agents and so far, only 338 have signed up to it via their membership of either ARLA, the National Approved Letting Scheme or the UK Association of Letting Agents.It’s invisible on the main portals and for example Zoopla doesn’t use the logo on the details pages for LRS members such as Foxtons, and agents are left to promote their membership of the LRS within their ‘free text’ areas on the site, many of whom – including Foxtons – don’t.The landlord accreditation schemes that existed prior to the LRS brought 13,300 landlords with them, so of the 15,369 landlords signed up to the scheme at the moment, 2,069 new ones have joined since 2014. The scheme is growing, albeit slowly and a further 224 landlords have been signed up since May this year.But barriers to entry for agents are relatively high, which may explain the limited enthusiasm for the project. The London Rental Standard requires at least one member of staff in each agent’s branch to have attained the required standard of training, among other things. High profile agents who have signed up include JLL, the Kings Group, Martin & Co, Ludlow Thompson, Ellis & Co and Foxtons.London Rental Standard Mayor of London Sadiq Khan October 18, 2016Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Home » News » London Rental Standard faces Khan ‘review’ previous nextRegulation & LawLondon Rental Standard faces Khan ‘review’Sceptical new Mayor of London set to make decision ‘very soon’Nigel Lewis18th October 20160677 Viewslast_img read more

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