Wind-Farm Giant Dong Energy Sees More Investors Taking Equity Positions in Offshore Assets

first_imgWind-Farm Giant Dong Energy Sees More Investors Taking Equity Positions in Offshore Assets FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Bloomberg New Energy Finance:Dong Energy said it is confident that financial investors will be prepared to buy equity stakes in the 480MW of German offshore wind farms, which the company won the rights to build thanks to record-breaking zero-subsidy bids in an auction in April.Martin Neubert, chief strategy officer at the wind power division of the Danish company, told BNEF that the three offshore wind projects in the German North Sea would be suitable for Dong’s ‘farm-down’ approach, in which it sells equity stakes pre-construction to outside investors in order to free up its own capital for further projects.Investors have previously shown they are willing to take on a certain degree of merchant price risk when committing capital to German renewable energy projects, “which typically only had a very short feed-in tariff period compared with the full lifetime of the asset,” he said. And Dong Energy has also shown that asset rotation works with U.K. projects built using Renewables Obligation Certificates that “have a very significant merchant price element”, he added.The farm-down model, otherwise known as asset rotation or build-sell-operate, involves utilities selling stakes in green power assets to institutional investors seeking long-term, stable yield. In the case of renewable energy, revenues for such projects have, until now, been underpinned by guaranteed subsidies.By bidding to build two 240MW offshore wind projects with no subsidy on top of the wholesale power price, Dong Energy has demonstrated the vastly improved economics of the technology.More: Dong Energy’s Zero-Subsidy Offshore Wind Farms Are Ripe for ‘Farm-Downs’last_img read more

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80% of power generation growth in Texas seen as coming from wind or solar

first_img80% of power generation growth in Texas seen as coming from wind or solar FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence:More than 80% of the new power generation capacity expected to come into service in 2019 in the Electric Reliability Council of Texas region will be either wind- or solar-driven, according to an S&P Global Market Intelligence analysis.Overall, the region, which encompasses most of the state of Texas including major load centers such as Houston and Dallas/Fort Worth, is expected to see 10,440 MW of new capacity go online in 2019, with 6,934 MW, or 66.4%, from wind and another 1,706 MW, or 16.3%, from solar. Gas-fired capacity using combined-cycle and gas-turbine technologies totals 1,770 MW and accounts for 17.0% of the scheduled additions.Unlike in 2018, when more than 4,000 MW of coal-fired capacity was retired, no retirements are scheduled for the year. One coal-fired plant, however, is being mothballed indefinitely.More: ($) S&P Global Market Intelligencelast_img read more

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Washington state moves step closer to adopting coal-free legislation with 2025 deadline

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Seattle Post-Intelligencer:The state House of Representatives, on a largely partisan 56-42 vote, passed a bill Thursday that moves Washington’s electrical utilities off coal by 2025, and to a complete “clean energy” grid by 2045.The bill goes back to the Senate to clear up small changes, and then on to Gov. Jay Inslee for signature. Already, supporters are celebrating what they predict will be a “fossil free future” for the state.The legislation is a likely stake through the heart of Montana’s big, coal-fired Colstrip power plant, about 100 miles southeast of Billings. Two of Colstrip’s four units are scheduled for closure, the other two are on the ropes. Puget Sound Energy is a major owner of the project.The bill includes resources for workers to assist in the transition to a clean energy economy.“I know in my heart and soul this will be one of the most important moves I will ever take,” said State Rep. Gael Tarleton, D-Seattle, a backer of the bill. It will be, she added, “the chance to build a 21st century economy beyond coal.”More: Legislature’s energy plan: A coal-free Washington by 2025 Washington state moves step closer to adopting coal-free legislation with 2025 deadlinelast_img read more

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Renewables supplied 55.8% of Germany’s electricity generation in the first half of 2020

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Renew Economy:Renewable energy accounted for 55.8 per cent of Germany’s net electricity generation across the first half of 2020, according to new figures published Wednesday by the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems (ISE). The record first half of 2020 included a new monthly high record of 61.8% renewables, set in February.Across the first six months of 2020, renewable energy dominated. Solar and wind electricity generation fed a total of 102.9TWh into Germany’s public electricity grid – up 11.5% on the same six months a year earlier. Wind energy was particularly dominant in Germany’s electricity grid, generating 30.6% of the total net generated electricity.In contrast, coal-fired power generation fell dramatically across the same period, with the share of electricity generated by lignite falling to 13.7% and hard coal down to only 6%.Germany’s new electricity generation paradigm was definitely affected by the global COVID-19 pandemic, with “noticeably lower demand for electricity” beginning in the second quarter “due to the decline in industrial production”, according to Fraunhofer ISE.Collectively, electricity consumption for the first six months of 2020 was only 234.2TWh, a dramatic 5% drop from 245.7TWh recorded during the first six months of 2019. Electricity production across the same period fell by 8% from 265.5TWh across the first six months of 2019 down 21.7TWh to 243.8TWh across the first six months of 2020.Despite such dramatic falls in both consumption and production, renewable electricity generation nevertheless grew, resulting in fossil fuel generation bearing the brunt of the decline. Together, renewable energy sources of wind, solar, hydro, and biomass, generated approximately 136.1TWh of electricity across the first half of 2020 as compared to 125.6TWh a year earlier.[Joshua Hill]More: German renewables surge to 55.8% of net generation for first half 2020 Renewables supplied 55.8% of Germany’s electricity generation in the first half of 2020last_img read more

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GO OUTSIDE BEFORE IT IS TOO LATE

first_imgRecently, I have had family from Florida come visit my husband and me here in the Blue Ridge Mountains.In August, we made my twin brother and his girlfriend go to our favorite overlook for a quick but scenic Sunday morning hike.As we approached the overlook we realized the entire ridge-line was covered in thick clouds. Within moments of reaching the top however, the clouds cleared and we had an amazing view of the valley below.Last week, we took my Dad on the exact same hike. Red and yellow leaves dropped on the trail before us as a light breeze kept many leaves in flight.We recalled a trip my family took when I was a child to Skyline Drive in the Shenandoah Mountains with my Dad’s parents. Picnic, small kids, bright and beautiful fall day, a bear cub, family… and even now, 20 some years later, we recall the majesty of it all.This weekend will be peak foliage for most of the Blue Ridge near my home in Roanoke. Although the higher elevations may have lost their luster, many valleys will be bright and bold with color.And my question on a  Friday morning, to all of us, is what are you going to do this weekend? Are you going to stay in and watch football on TV? Maybe clean the house (my usual Saturday activity) or are you going to create new memories worth talking about in 20 years?Fall is such a special reminder that life does not always stay the same. Sometimes it is dark and cold, and other days are bright and brilliant. This weekend will be the later and I don’t want any to miss the opportunity to enjoy it, explore it, or be filled by it.So here is my short but simple Fall weekend bucket list. Please listen to someone who knows. Cleaning can wait. You can tape that football game. You can visit the mall later. But if you waste this special season on the ordinary, you will regret it. So I hope to see you outside, before it is too late and winter removes the color for another year.Outdoor Yoga class Run a 4 mile race in the darkVisit people you love outside and create new memoriesGo on a Ghost TourSpend the day at a pumpkin festivalBuild a bonfire in your back yard and have friends overGo for a bike ride down by the riverPack a picnic and enjoy the Blue Ridge Parkway  Dust off your Mountain bike and find a local trailPick apples and make apple butter for the first timeCollect leaves with a small child and name them – Maple, Oak, etc.Turn off your computer, turn your phone on vibrate, and enjoy this special season. Perhaps this weekend will be one worth talking about in 20 years.last_img read more

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Run happy

first_imgRecently I went for a run while visiting a college town in the Southeast. I won’t name names, but let’s just say that most of the runners I encountered exhibited a somewhat cavalier attitude. I was disappointed by the lack of hellos, waves, smiles, even eye contact. I don’t think I detected a single friendly gesture from any of the dozens of runners who passed by me. Ironically, I was greeted repeatedly and enthusiastically by street cleaners, people waiting for the bus, and even an old man sitting on his porch in the seedy section of town.Now I know that people run for a variety of reasons, and are in different mindsets when they are out for a workout. But, gosh, these folks all looked like they were either being tortured or were training for the Olympics and couldn’t be bothered to acknowledge a schmuck like me.Maybe some of the runners I passed were in the middle of a tough tempo workout, and to look up would’ve taken more energy than they could muster. Maybe some had just had an argument with a loved one and had gone for a run to clear their heads. Maybe some simply were not morning people, and the mere thought of smiling at that hour was unbearable.Perhaps they were worried that I was going to stop and ask them for directions, or attempt to engage them in conversation, or even challenge them to a race. Many people view their morning runs as their only opportunity for solitude during the day, and they just don’t want to be disturbed. I get that. I also understand what it’s like to be tired, hot and cranky from the humidity or a long hill. The thing is, we’re all in this together. I’m proud to be among the minority of folks who drag our butts out of bed before sunrise in order to hit the road or trail. I feel a certain kinship with the other brave souls who are out there putting in the miles while others rest cozily in their beds. For me, a smile or wave sends the message that, yeah, I might be feeling pretty tired right now, but overall, I’m psyched to be out here pushing myself – and I’m glad to see you doing the same. It’s also a reminder that, even though some miles are harder than others, running is essentially meant to be a joyous activity.So next time you pass another runner on the sidewalk, please don’t pretend you don’t see him, even though you’re squeezing by one another on a narrow strip of asphalt. Take a moment to look him or her in the eye and give a wave or word of encouragement. It won’t slow you down, I promise – and the smile you’ll get in return might even put an extra spring in your step.last_img read more

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F3T: Fly Fishing Film Tour

first_imgTU 5 Rivers Program Coordinator Max Guggenheimer raffles prizes during intermission at the Fly Fishing Film Tour.When it comes to fly fishing videos we are living in some heady times. Over the past couple years, films focused on fly fishing have virtually exploded the internet gaining as much traction as on the media side as other action sports like skiing and mountain biking. Fly fishing has become more popular for sure, but with the market being flooded with high quality, inexpensive (and waterproof) HD video cameras, producing a compelling video on any subject is now as easy as ordering a pizza, then taking that pizza to the river. Retailers and manufacturers are also getting involved, sponsoring pros and amateurs alike in there visual pursuits. All this adds up to a robust and ever growing and evolving fly fishing film scene that is exploding right before our eyes. We’ll be telling our grandkids we were there at the beginning. All this output has culminated in the pros putting together a couple of film tours that select the best of the best.The Fly Fishing Film Tour, or F3T, is one of those tours. We caught the tour as it swung through the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, Va., sponsored by the Virginia Council of Trout Unlimited, 5 Rivers Program and shown for free. This is a special occasion as most stops on the tour charge $10-15 bucks a pop to attend. The first half of the show includes some great fishing action, and features a film called Urban Lines that focuses on fly fishing the tidal waters of the Potomac River in downtown Washington, D.C. The second half features films focused more on conservation issues in North America and worldwide. Also, Hank Patterson is prevalent throughout, adding a bit of levity to the whole thing.Like most showings, the Lexington stop was attended by a large crowd of anglers and a healthy dose of vendors and advocacy groups including Cheeky Reels, Trout Unlimited, Albemarle Angler, South River Fly Shop, and our old friend Matt Miles, who you may remember from our story on musky fishing. A good time was had by all and Max Guggenhiem used the venue to raise awareness of the VCTU’s 5 Rivers program aimed at promoting Trout Unlimited’s mission of conservation and stewardship on college and university campuses. With two universities in Lexington, VMI and Washington and Lee, it seemed like the perfect venue especially given the two schools have recently struck up a friendly competition between their respective fly fishing clubs. This year’s tournament will take place at Escatawba Farms on March 23.The F3T will make a couple more stops in the region this spring:February 25, 2013 – Nashville, TNFebruary 28, 2013 – Atlanta, GAMarch 8, 2013 – Knoxville, TNMarch 13, 2013 – Charlotte, NCMarch 16, 2013 – Baltimore, MDMarch 28, 2013 – Arlington, VAApril 4, 2013 – Asheville, NCApril 11, 2013 – Cartersville, GAMay 17, 2013 – Cullowhee, NCClick here for a full schedule and map.Check out the trailers to some of our favorite films from the festival:last_img read more

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Mountain Mama: Training While Traveling

first_img Connect: Before visiting a new destination, research running groups and stores online. See if they have runs or even local races during the dates of your visit. If you’re attending a conference, consider tweeting your running plans with the conferences’ hashtag to see if other attendees want to join. There’s no better way to network than sharing a good run.Road Warrior, share your own running-while-traveling stories when you get a chance. I’d love to hear about your own experiences running on the road.Trotting Along,Mountain Mama Dear Mountain Mama,Work takes me on the road a lot. Any tips on how to stick to my training schedule when out of town?Thanks,Road WarriorDear Road Warrior,A colleague recently told me about her best run ever. One morning before the temperatures settled in the triple digits, she ran out of her grandma’s front door two miles to the cemetery where she buried her mom, who was in her in early 40s when she passed. She’s a 30-something working mom who drove 16 hours with two children under ten to visit her grandma in the Midwest.My friend touched her mom’s tombstone before trotting back to her grandma and daughters. Endorphins mixed with tears. For the first time instead of feeling sad about visiting the cemetery, she felt grateful to be connected to her mom, to share one of the routine aspects of her life like running. She’s missed that the most, being able to pick up the phone and call her mom to tell her about her daughter’s first day of kindergarten or to relay how her race training was going. That day on the run to the cemetery where her mom is buried, she felt like her mom knew about it all.When my colleague told me about her cemetery run, it changed the way I thought about running on my then upcoming trip to Santa Cruz. Sometimes I can be the kind of person I don’t like to be – I see the hole instead of the donut. I was thinking about jet lag and all the friends I wanted to visit and the all-day sailing classes. My mental to-do list had me exhausted before even stepping off the plane. Fitting in training runs seemed daunting. But after hearing her story, I thought about all the times my friends and I had sea kayaked, surfed, and swam along the same stretch of the Pacific where I planned to run. Each step would connect me to half marathons I’d run along the very same road, and closer to the person I’d been back in my carefree days before becoming a working single mom living on the east coast.And that’s exactly what happened. Running by all those surfers made me smile as an impossibly blue sky shone down not on me, but through me, until I become as bright as the California sun. And that’s why I run, at home or on the road, to remember the person I have been and to pave the way to the person I’m becoming.For those of you looking for a little motivation during the next family vacation or work trip, here are three tips that have helped me look forward to running on the road:Attitude: Attitude makes or breaks a run. Remembering the reasons why we run in the first place makes it easy to lace up our shoes and head out the door. When we view running as a treat instead of a task, we are open to the endorphins, seeing new sites, making new friends, processing thoughts, and unwinding. Each stride because something positive, and that reinforces our motivation, bolstering our energy run after run. Prepare: Always carry wipes, baby or otherwise and a few of your favorite bars. Too often I find myself making the excuse that I don’t have enough time to go for a run because I have to go somewhere and look presentable. But it’s amazing what a good cool down and a few wipes will do for my redness. Or I let myself get too hungry to run – amazing how a few energy bars eliminates that excuse. Being prepared helps me use breaks during conferences efficiently and I hit the pavement instead of holing up behind my laptop. Not only do I log my miles, but I feel more energized to tackle the rest of the conference.last_img read more

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The Act of Rediscovery

first_imgI’m often asked, “Where’s your favorite place you’ve been so far?”That’s an incredibly difficult question to answer, and if you catch me on an off day, I may respond in some sarcastic tone and completely dismiss your inquiry.But it’s understandable why people ask. When I attended the Adventure Photography Workshop in Jackson Hole, Wyo., last fall, I suddenly found myself sitting in front of a number of my biggest idols (namely Tim Kemple, Corey Rich, Lucas Gilman, and Chris Burkard). The best part? These guys were willing to answer any and all questions I had for them. These adventure photographers have visited nearly every corner of the world, from the highest peaks to the deepest seas, and so of course, my first question went something along the lines of, “Where’s your favorite place you’ve been?”But if there’s anything these past six (oh my goodness – SIX?!) months of living on the road have taught me, it’s that the real pleasures of life lie in the act of rediscovery. While discovering a new place is certainly an exciting, novel means of diving headfirst into the unknown, some of my greatest memories from the road have been in rediscovering an area I consider familiar.Allow me to explain.This past weekend, I found myself back in a town I fondly refer to as “home” – Damascus, Va. Damascus was my home away from home in college. When I wasn’t in class or studying for tests, I was running on the Appalachian Trail, drinking coffee at Mojoe’s, or paddling on the number of class II-III creeks and rivers that converge in the heart of town. I loved this little mountain oasis so much so, that my senior year in college, I decided to live just outside of town on a little hill in a little white house and commute 20 minutes to school every day.I must have run that same 8-mile stretch of trail dozens of times. And the rivers? Surely the number of trips I’ve taken down the South Fork of the Holston River alone rank in the triple digits. Until this past weekend, I thought I knew everything that Damascus had to offer.As is tradition within the paddling “fam” in Damascus, Sunday is church day. When the local river is running, we paddle. The South Fork of the Holston is a quiet little class II run most of the year. It’s our stomping grounds, the river that taught us to read water and catch eddies and ferry across current. I remember being scared, standing on the banks of the put-in at Drowning Ford (the name certainly didn’t help those first-timer-nerves) and decked from head-to-toe in borrowed gear. Back then, the South Fork was a raging monster of a river, unnavigable at best. I and my little kayak were just along for the ride, powerless to the fickle whims of the river.But as time went on, the South Fork became less of a beast and more of a nurturing momma bear. We’d do full moon and new moon paddles, group floatillas with 30+ people and every assortment of craft you can imagine. We’d do laps or connect sections of river further upstream or park and play all day at the surf hole. Heck, we’d even booze cruise the damn thing in the dead of winter (there’s nothing a little Peppermint Schnapps can’t handle). Eventually though, especially after I’d spent a couple seasons guiding in the New River Gorge and paddling elsewhere throughout the Southeast, the South Fork became a little boring, and I began to lose sight of the true beauty and magic of that river.And then this past Sunday, I rediscovered that feeling of awe I experienced all those years ago. As our group floated downstream toward the confluence of Laurel Creek and the South Fork of the Holston, we pulled off on river right to check out a rock feature that starts to resemble a cave at lower water levels. As I explored deep back into the crevasses, I realized I’d never done this before. All of those years I’d spent paddling this same stretch of river and not once had I ever veered off the main flow to prod beneath the cliff face.The river glimmered in the sunlight, bouncing a mirage of watery illusions on the rock above. In that moment, it didn’t feel like I was back on my home turf, paddling with the people that taught me to kayak. It felt strangely surreal, exotic, like the river was entirely foreign yet faintly familiar all in one go.DCIM102GOPRODCIM102GOPROWe peeled out and continued floating downstream. As the current lapped at my boat, so too did those images of watery reflections on stone cold sandstone. The sun was shining. The water, frigid but surprisingly clear given its long journey down the mountain. Our group of five chattered quietly as we paddled along. There was no sense of urgency in our strokes, no need for checking the clock. We were on river time. I thought to myself how simple and how beautiful it all was, this day on the water.And then, all at once, our group chattering fell quiet. The faint flapping of wings overhead made us all turn our chins to the sky. The shadow of a bald eagle slowly came into view as it carved across the river, settling on a branch just downstream of us. When we caught up to him, he peered questioningly at us from his perch, as if to say, “What the hell are you looking at?” He didn’t fly away though, seemingly unperturbed by our floating posse of plastic boats. Instead, he lazily drifted downstream and landed on another branch, like a guide showing a trip down the river.DCIM102GOPRO DCIM102GOPRONo one spoke as we continued floating, heads craned back and eyes squinting to see the fading silhouette of our escort against the afternoon sun. I’ve seen herons and osprey on this river before, but never a bald eagle, and never so intimately. We eventually lost sight of our river guide, and about the only words I could summon were “dude” and “whoa.”Even after our paddle as I was driving north to my parents’ home in northern Virginia, the magic of those two little moments lingered in my mind. Sure, perhaps the South Fork of the Holston isn’t on the bucket list of must-paddle rivers in the Southeast, but that doesn’t make it any less of a gem.###The next time you find yourself somewhere you’ve been a million times before, take the time to stop and look at it with a fresh pair of eyes. You might be surprised with what you find.last_img read more

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VIDEO: “Aegir” is Showing Eastern Paddling in a New Light

first_imgDavid-Fusilli-Tygart-RiverPhoto by Ramon DomporFrom the underrated but premier whitewater rapids of West Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania now comes a first-hand look at paddling life on the East coast.Eastern rivers sometimes go unnoticed in the shadow of many world-class runs, but the film Aegir seeks to give underdogs like Deckers Creek, Bull Run, the Youghiogheny River, and the Tygart River the attention they deserve.We sat down with paddler and producer Adam Nawrot to get more information on the project. “I contacted Dave Fusilli and Jared Seiler of the infamous kayaking collective Demshitz last year about shooting a project here on the East Coast,” he explains. “These guys are no strangers to paddling all over the globe but have a big soft spot for the local runs they grew up on.”The filming process brought with it an inspiring energy for both the paddlers and producers themselves, as well as the surrounding paddling community. “Shooting with the Demshitz gang is a wild time,” Nawrot says of his adventures along the way. “When Demshitz is filming, people want to be involved and that’s awesome because everyone is so stoked to be out there and the vibe is really great! That positive energy goes a long way when the film crew is hauling camera cranes through rhododendron thickets and loosing members in chest high snow drifts.”Nawrot remembers the most exciting part of the whole project, when the group decided to light up Swallow Falls on the Youghiogheny River and capture the river under the stars. “That ended up being the launching point for the main section of the short film. It was really special to be capturing something that not only looked amazing and other-otherworldly on camera but that also had the athletes stoked to be interacting and experiencing the river in a new and abstract way. The biggest thing we learned during this project, however, is that law enforcement does not appreciate how rad it is to be filming sick kayaking footage at night.”Despite any struggles with the police, though, Aegir has successfully put East coast back in the spotlight. Here is Nawrot’s final entry into 2014’s Kayak Session Short Film of the Year Awards.last_img read more

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