Group discusses voting

first_imgVoter registration and education on local political issues will create positive channels between Notre Dame students and the surrounding area, student body president Catherine Soler told Campus Life Council (CLC) Monday. Social Concerns chair Pat McCormick said the Center for Social Concerns and student government teamed up to get students involved in the election. CLC members supported the campaign to vote in local elections and learn more about important issues in the South Bend community. “We have put a lot of time and energy into this issue,” Soler said. “Voter registration gives us some of the best opportunities for community involvement.” Recent negative energy between Notre Dame students and South Bend Police created tensions that could be helped if members of the community see the student body reaching them through  the elections, Soler said. “We are encouraging students to take full membership in the community,” McCormick said. Finding the best way for each student to participate in the local community is the most important part of this project, Soler said. “What we are doing is essentially a three-tier process,” McCormick said. The campaign broke into components of education, registration of Indiana voters and involvement of out-of-state students in local elections, he said. “First, we are encouraging all students regardless of their state of residency to learn about the issues that affect us most,” McCormick said. “Education for voters is a huge part of this idea.” Second, students who are Indiana residents are strongly encouraged to register to vote and learn about dominant issues in their home state, he said. Third, out-of-state students can legally switch their permanent residence to Indiana in order to vote in local elections, McCormick said, but this change might cause problems post-graduation based on state policies. Some students might find the transition back to their home state more difficult after switching their permanent residency to Indiana, he said. “Students who are interested in that route should get advice from someone trained in legal issues to find out what that change would look like for them,” McCormick said.last_img read more

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Members support textbook rental

first_imgStudent Senate passed a resolution that encouraged professors to help students rent, rather than purchase, textbooks from the Hammes Notre Dame Bookstore for their classes. Academic Affairs chair AJ McGauley said the resolution will encourage professors to embrace the Rent-A-Text program, which was established this semester. “The idea of this resolution is to use it as a starting point for talking with professors and deans about using rentals,” McGauley said. Student government created Rent-A-Text so students could save money by renting textbooks from the Bookstore rather than buying them. “On average a student would save about 50 percent on the rental price of the buying price,” McGauley said. The Hammes Notre Dame Bookstore can only provide books for Rent-A-Text that appear a national list sponsored by the Follett’s or a local Follett’s list begun by the University. To add a textbook to a local list for Notre Dame, a professor must commit to use the textbook for four semesters. Professors must add textbooks to the local list and notify the Bookstore for final approval, McGauley said. McGauley said the program was successful during its inaugural semester, and student government hopes to expand the program. In the resolution, the senators resolved to encourage “that professors consider the Rent-A-Text program and the texts currently included in the national and local lists when selecting future material.” Nearly half of students surveyed about Rent-A-Text indicated they would rent more texts if more titles were available, the resolution said. Community Relations chair Claire Sokas said the resolution could help make more textbooks available to rent. “I am a science major,” Sokas said. “I could not rent a lot of my textbooks this year.” Lewis Hall senator Marina Seminatore said committing to a textbook for multiple semesters might restrict professors. “If they have to commit to four terms of use professors could still find another book they like better,” Seminatore said. “Committing to use the first might not be beneficial to their class.” The senators acknowledged not all professors could make Rent-A-Text work for their courses but said they hoped to see some expansion. The Senate passed the resolution unanimously.last_img read more

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New minor looks at Constitution

first_imgUndergraduates will have the chance to delve deeper into the nuances of government when the new David Potenziani Program in Constitutional Studies, a part of the political science department, launches as a minor program this fall. “For our undergraduates, we hope to offer a course of study that invites them to think deeply and broadly from a variety of perspectives and disciplines about the most fundamental questions of life and law,” Vincent Muñoz, a professor in the program, said. Muñoz said some of these questions include, “What is the proper relationship between government and civil society, between law and moral principles?” and “What are the philosophical foundations of human rights and constitutional democracy?” The minor has been in development for several years, but was proposed and accepted to the College of Arts and Letters this semester, Muñoz said. The minor will be open to all undergraduates, regardless of their college or career aspirations. “We hope that the minor will be particularly useful to those students who might have a vocation to careers in politics, law and public policy, but we hope that we serve all students interested in fundamental questions of justice, citizenship and the common good,” he said. Muñoz said the minor will be interdisciplinary in nature. Courses will come from the political science, philosophy, theology and history departments and even the law school, he said. Students are required to take five courses from four different components to complete the minor, Muñoz said. These components are, “Constitutionalism: History and Philosophy,” “The American Founding and American Constitutional History,” “Constitutional Government and Public Policy” and “Comparative Constitutionalism and International Law.” “These general categories will focus on the great political and constitutional debates in American and world history and on the underlying principles of constitutional government — for example, natural and civil rights, social contract theory, the market economy, voluntary associations, separation of powers, popular sovereignty and the rule of law,” Muñoz said. Muñoz said the gateway course for the minor will be Constitutionalism, Law and Politics, which he taught for the first time last semester. Sophomore Lizzie Helpling, who is considering the constitutional studies minor, took the course last semester and said it shaped her interest in the field. “I think the class itself really helped me develop a deeper understanding of constitutional thought and interpretation, especially in the American tradition,” Helpling said. In addition to the minor, Muñoz said the David Potenziani Program in Constitutional Studies will sponsor constitutional studies lectures. For starters, the program is sponsoring a lecture from Professor Jeffrey Tulis of the University of Texas titled “The Possibility of Constitutional Statesmanship.” The lecture will take place Feb. 6 in DeBartolo Hall 131 at 4:30 p.m., he said. “Once the minor begins, constitutional studies minors will be invited to meet with such visiting faculty members over lunch or dinner or perhaps at a faculty member’s house,” Muñoz said.last_img read more

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Alumnus shares design career trajectory

first_imgRyan Meinerding, the Head of Visual Development at Marvel Studios and 1999 Notre Dame graduate, spoke Monday night in West Lake Hall about his career in design and his work on various movies including Iron Man 2, Captain America and The Avengers.“I head up a team of artists that actually do all the character design for all of the marvel studios movies,” Meinerding said. “We also do key frame illustrations, which is going through the script and figuring out what the key moments are and how to visualize them. We illustrate and design things as early as possible in production so the director and producers can understand what the movie is going to look like before it’s made.”Meinerding said he dabbled in website and video game character design before working for Marvel Studios.“I began trying to do animation style work, but I learned very quickly that across all of the companies that do animation: Pixar, DreamWorks, Sony, there are basically three guys that do all of the animation,” he said. “The jobs that are design jobs for the other people are designing all the doors or all the tables in the films and I decided pretty quickly I wasn’t going to do animation, which is sad because I really enjoy it.“That’s when I started to do more realistic work, like live action film design.”Meinerding said he and his team focus on whatever story the filmmakers are trying to tell and align the spirit of the characters with the Marvel Universe.“The visuals of the movie define the tone, however dramatic or comedic, and that’s the driving force for the storytelling,” he said. “Behind that, we aim to be true to the comics. Other comic book movies that are being done not by Marvel Studios aren’t always using that as the basis for their films, but at Marvel we try to be true to the story of the film and true to the source material.”“We have a faith in the character and in the brand that’s been around forever,” he said. “Captain America has been around for over 70 years. We try to find what’s fantastic about that character and bring it to life, as opposed to reinterpreting or changing it.”One of the biggest challenges as a designer in the film industry is maintaining a sense of integrity and pride in your work, Meinerding said, while still putting out pieces at the demanding pace required by the industry.“It’s very easy to get beaten down by deadlines and say I can’t do something good,” he said. “That’s a constant challenge with concept art because things have gotten to the point where people are just using photocopying and using pictures as their bases and not taking pride in their work, they just want to get something done that looks realistic.”Meinerding said it can be challenging when his work is not selected as the final design, but that he has learned to step back as a manager and realize that the design that is chosen will be quality.“Our job is to present the best options that we are capable of preventing,” he said. “If I get to draw Captain America and it doesn’t get picked I’m still okay with that because I got to draw Captain America. It can get disheartening in some context like when politics are involved and they actively aren’t picking the best design, but because we’re in a place where I have hired a lot of people that I know are doing great stuff. If my stuff doesn’t get picked, I still know it’s going to be a good design.”Tags: Marvellast_img read more

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Orientation introduces transfer students to ND community

first_imgHearing “I have always wanted to go to Notre Dame” is not unusual on campus, but for senior Liz Hynes, who transferred to Notre Dame the fall of her sophomore year, this phrase has an entirely new meaning.“Coming to campus as a student for the first time is completely surreal,” Hynes said. “Among transfers, you’ve got a lot of lifelong dreamers who’ve had to wait for a second chance, so we’re doubly grateful.”Hynes said unlike typical undergraduate students, transfer students do not have the luxury of enjoying a full four years at Notre Dame. “Get out of bed every day. There will be days when you’re sick or exhausted, and you’ll be tempted to stay in bed for 12 to 24 hours,” she said. “Don’t do it.”Instead, Hynes said, she would advise new transfers to make the most of their time on campus.“We will never be this rich in time and opportunity again, where we can write for a newspaper and join student government and create art with our friends and study things we’ve always been curious about,” she said. “Life won’t always let us do all of these things at once. Life will make us choose. Don’t do that one second before you have to. Do everything. Get out of bed.”Junior Emily Schneider transferred last fall from Kansas State University, a school she said “could not have been more different than Notre Dame.”“I did not know what to expect from such a transition, but I immediately felt as if I belonged at Notre Dame and felt like a member of the Notre Dame family,” Schneider said.This year, Schneider, along with 24 other transfer students from previous years, will be leading the new transfers through their orientation process. “Transfer orientation helps so much and really helped me to feel like a second year student, instead of like a freshman again,” Schneider said. “It really helps students make strong friendships and bonds with other transfers in the same situation. I met some of my best friends during transfer orientation and could not be more grateful for the experience.”Instead of going through orientation with their respective dorms, transfers are divided up into small groups called “transfer families,” according to junior and transfer orientation leader Nick Olmanson. “The thing that I am most excited about is meeting all the new students in my transfer family. Leaders are grouped in twos and are combined with about six or seven new students to create a family,” Olmanson said. Olmanson said he hopes to be a good resource to his transfer family, even beyond orientation.“Last year my transfer family was pretty close. We organized dinners throughout the year and I hope to be able to build friendships like those,” he said. Transfer families tend to stay close, and Olmanson said several students from his transfer family went on to be co-rec flag football champions that year. “My transfer family was very influential for me and everyone I met got along great,” he said. “I remained close friends with them as the year went on. The leaders last year did a great job and my transfer parents specifically made me want to be a leader to give that great experience to the next transfer class.”Olmanson also said he encourages transfers to reach out to people in their dorms. “I am lucky to have a bunch of great guys living in my dorm as well.  I was able to meet them pretty early on in the year, so that made the transition easy,” Olmanson said. Hynes said the separation between the incoming freshmen and the transfer class is key. “While some other schools lump transfers in with incoming freshmen, Notre Dame keeps in mind that these students have already spent time in college and don’t need to start from square one,” Hynes said. “They’re already aces at college, otherwise they wouldn’t have been accepted as transfers. So we make sure they get an experience that assists specifically with their transition to Notre Dame.”Hynes described the welcome luncheon of transfer orientation as “the happiest room in the world.” “The energy that everyone’s sharing — the excitement, the anxiety, the relief at finally being here — it’s incredibly special,” Hynes said. Senior Jake Wagner, who transferred to Notre Dame for the 2014-2015 academic year, said he advises new transfer students not to get overwhelmed by the process. “I know I was very overwhelmed, and thought I wasn’t cut out for Notre Dame,” Wagner said. “Transferring to Notre Dame can be a very difficult transition for a lot of people, but things get better. Don’t forget that you have the transfer network here to help you.”Tags: Transfer, transfer orientation, Transfer-Olast_img read more

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Founder of #MeToo Movement speaks at Notre Dame

first_imgTarana Burke, the founder of the #MeToo movement, spoke to the Notre Dame community Monday evening about her leadership in activism against sexual violence in society. The lecture kicked off “Sex and the Soul Week,” an event week that seeks to promote dialogue about sexuality and faith on campus.The talk, moderated by Maria McKenna, professor of education and Africana Studies, was sponsored by Multicultural Student Programs and Services and cosponsored by the Gender Relations Center, Campus Ministry, the McDonald Center for Student Well-being and student government.During the talk, Burke described her early work as a camp youth leader and its large impact on her decision to pursue activism against injustice in society.“I started doing work around sexual violence almost by accident,” she said. “I was an organizer at a very young age. I started working when I was 14. Once I discovered what that was, and that I had the power to change things, I became very obsessed with [activism].”Anne Elizabeth Barr | The Observer A sexual assault survivor herself, Burke described her realization of the pervasiveness of sexual assault and violence — especially in communities of women of color — early on in her life.“Nobody in my world talked about sexual violence although many of us were survivors. We would find out by happenstance,” she said. “We sort of lived with this reality. As I was dealing with my own healing, as a part of that journey, I was also dealing with young people, young black girls in particular, who were carrying the same burdens. I was just a couple of steps ahead of them in recognizing what it was.”Burke founded the #MeToo movement in 2006 to create a community of women of color, particularly black women, who are survivors of sexual harassment and assault in need of a place for healing. This soon became a platform for activism against such a societal injustice.“#MeToo came from my inability to say, ‘Me, too,’ to a young person in a time I think she really needed to hear it and struggling with, ‘Why can’t I say this?’, ‘Why can’t I share my own story?’ and also, ‘Why are there so many people with such stories?’” Burke said. “It was a marriage of my sense of looking for where injustice is and where we can do something different and also seeing this as a community problem that no one was addressing.”It was not until October of 2017, however, that the #MeToo Movement took Twitter by storm after celebrity actresses came forward with sexual abuse accusations against film mogul Harvey Weinstein.Later that year, Burke was named one of the Silence Breakers on Time’s Person of the Year edition for her role as the founder of the movement.Burke discussed her reactions to the movement’s viral attention and momentum, describing the importance of not letting its growth get in the way of its original purpose — creating systemic change and healing for sexual assault victims, particularly for women of color.“It is not sustainable to build a movement over simply naming wrong-doers and not looking at the systems that they come out of and not looking at ways to dismantle those systems,” she said.Burke is currently the senior director of Brooklyn-based Girls for Gender Equity, “an intergenerational organization committed to the physical, psychological, social and economic development of girls and women,” according to the group’s site. Burke said she is working to direct the #MeToo movement back towards its roots of healing and activism.“Part of my job now is to talk about the movement and the vision of #MeToo,” Burke said. “Our vision is to make sure that survivors of sexual violence are able to craft a healing journey, and it’s also to inspire leadership amongst survivors and activate survivors as advocates in this work to end sexual violence.”Tags: #MeToo, Sex and the Soul Week, Tarana Burkelast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s to host literacy night at local elementary school

first_imgWhen asked about the Saint Mary’s annual Literacy Night event, senior Sam Schickel summarized the event in just four words — “reading, math, science, food.”“Literacy Night is an annual event that Saint Mary’s College hosts at an area elementary school,” Rebekah DeLine, head of the Office for Civil and Social Engagement (OCSE), said in an email. “It’s an event wherein children and their families can participate in activities that focus on reading and arithmetic, have some fun and also take home a book or two for their home library.”Literacy Night is organized by the OCSE, Coquillard Elementary School in South Bend and Saint Mary’s students. “This event started as a celebration of the late Dr. Seuss and has transformed into a general promotion of reading,” DeLine said.DeLine said that the event has been a good way for Saint Mary’s students to interact with the local South Bend community.“Literacy Night has brought together a diverse group of individuals both from the community and the College,” DeLine said. “For Saint Mary’s students, it provides a hands-on opportunity to serve with a low barrier to entry. For the community and particularly the young people who attend, it has provided an opportunity to enjoy an evening at the school with college women who the kids really seem to look up to. Attendance at Literacy Night also allows the families who attend to take a few free books home to add to the resources that their kids can access every day.”Not only is the event open for the elementary school students of Coquillard, but to their siblings as well. Schickel, who also works as a teaching assistant at Coquillard, said volunteers can expect to see attendees ranging in age from babies to high schoolers.“The students at Coquillard really look up to the Saint Mary’s students and since we do other activities there other various volunteer programs in Coquillard. … They love to introduce us to their families,” Schickel said. “It’s good for them to have a positive role model, like the women that are going to volunteer. For us, I think it’s a great way to connect with our community. I think it’s easy to be stuck in our little Saint Mary’s community. It’s just an opportunity to get out and have some fun with the kids.” It is not necessary to be an education major to participate. Of the nine volunteers signed up so far, Schickel said none of them were education majors.“[Volunteers] will be working one of our ten stations,” Schickel said. “Those range from teaching them how to read a clock and a little game about that, and shooting spider man webs to catch spiders. We got a little ocean in a bottle like Aquaman.”Literacy Night will take place Tuesday, March 26, from 5-6 p.m. OSCE will provide transportation to Coquillard Elementary for any and all volunteers. More volunteers are welcomed and appreciated, Schickel said, and students who wish to help can email [email protected] “[The goal is] to have fun,” DeLine said. “The time goes by super quickly and depending on which activity the students are helping with it can even get a little messy. But overall, everyone should expect to have a blast with families in the Coquillard School community.”Tags: literacy night, Office of Civic and Social Engagementlast_img read more

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Orientation Steering Committee strives for inclusivity through hall programming

first_imgTom Naatz | The Observer Welcome Weekend kicks off Friday for incoming Notre Dame students. Designed to orient the new class, the weekend is comprised of an annual line-up of events.Senior Megan Holzgrefe, a member of the Orientation Steering Committee, said the role of the committee members is intermediary.“Part of being on the committee is [overseeing] two to three different dorms and working with their captains to help coordinate events,” Holzgrefe said. “We are kind of like liaisons between the dorm captains and then Notre Dame administrative side of Welcome Weekend.”Holzgrefe said no committee members serve as liaisons to their own dorms. For example, Holzgrefe lives in Cavanaugh Hall but overlooks Dillon Hall and Lewis Hall. Junior Aaron Benavides is also a member of the committee. Benavides, who serves as the student government press secretary, said student government isn’t too involved with Welcome Weekend this year, with a few exceptions. (Editor’s Note: Aaron Benavides is a former news writer for The Observer.)“Notably, [student body president] Elizabeth [Boyle] and [vice president] Pat [McGuire] will be at the University Welcome on Friday and will also be involved with the first back-to-school Mass,” he said.Benavides said the general rundown of Welcome Weekend looks similar to last year’s Welcome Weekend, including the first Moreau class for first years, the class photo in the stadium and DomerFest, among other events. Benavides also noted this year’s Multicultural Student Programs and Services (MSPS) Saturday night programming theme is “Inclusive Voices for Excellence and Equity.”Both Benavides and Holzgrefe said the committee has implemented some new requirements and suggestions this year based on data collected from previous Welcome Weekends. “This year, in an attempt to make sure that we are getting everyone actively involved [and to make sure] that every member of the Notre Dame family feels included and welcome, we implemented a few new things in terms of dorm programming,” Benavides said. Each year, new students are asked to complete a reflection concerning their Welcome Weekend experience which includes questions about in-hall programming. It is from these surveys that data is collected to measure the popularity of Welcome Weekend events among students. Lauren Donahue, program director of New Student Engagement and advisor to the Orientation Steering Committee, analyzed the data over the months leading up to this year’s Welcome Weekend and then presented it to the committee. “What we learned from last year’s survey is that halls that hosted most of their events with halls of the opposite sex wanted to spend more time with only their community or with halls of the same sex. Halls that spent most of their time with only other halls also requested more time with just their community,” Donahue said in an email. “This year, I have encouraged students to strive for a 1:1 ratio with their in-hall programming to create a more even balance between the time students spend with male and female halls.”Donahue also said hall captains have been asked to host one event each solely with their own hall community. The goal, she said, is to be more intentional with programming for the enjoyment of all students. “[We found that] just a requirement to have an event just within your own [dorm] community on both nights of programming is really important,” Benavides said. Benavides used his own dorm, Duncan Hall, as an example.“On Saturday night, you need to have an event with your own community, so Duncan has to have an event just with itself. Let’s say if [Duncan] has an event with Badin Hall, then it also needs to have an event with a men’s dorm like Alumni or Dillon,” Benavides said. Holzgrefe said she thought many dorms had a skewed ratio of events with fellow men’s and women’s halls. According to the data, students wanted more of a combination of events that wasn’t skewed one way or another, she said.“It’s hard to make it absolutely perfect,” Holzgrefe said. ” … Trying to make it as equal as logistically possible is our goal this year.”Benavides said the Orientation Steering Committee is striving for events that are inclusive and welcoming for all types of students. “[We are] being really mindful about students with disabilities, international students, multicultural students, first generation students and really we just want to make sure everyone has a great time during Welcome Weekend,” he said. “That’s our focus.”Holzgrefe said the feeling of being welcomed and included was a large part of her own Welcome Weekend as a first year. “I really want to make sure that all of the first year students feel that and that their parents feel comfortable leaving their kids here,” Holzgrefe said. Tags: Orientation Steering Committee, Welcome Weekend Notre Dame will welcome the class of 2023 and transfer students this weekend with an annual line-up of events known as Welcome Weekend. Designed to orient new students to Notre Dame before school starts, the events are coordinated and planned by the Orientation Steering Committee and Welcome Weekend teams within all dorms. Spanning Friday through Sunday, about 2000 new students will arrive on campus early to participate in the events.last_img read more

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New marketing major introduced for SMC business students

first_imgProspective Saint Mary’s students will be able to pursue a new major in marketing within the Department of Business and Economics, the College announced Friday.James Rogers, senior lecturer in the department and business marketing coordinator, said conversations about developing a marketing major began in fall of 2018.“The impetus for the marketing major was initially the large number of students enrolled as marketing concentration students, students indicating an interest in marketing among recently declared business majors and a similarly high interest in marketing among business intended students,” Rogers said.Before the addition of the new marketing major, a concentration in marketing within the business major was the most specialized option available to students interested in the field. While the concentration will continue to be offered, the major provides a more comprehensive education in the methods and practices of the industry, Rogers said. “Developing new courses in proper sequencing with existing courses was necessary to offer appropriate depth and breadth to meet the high requirements of the industry and post-graduate study,” Rogers said. “Creating a course rotation able to serve students and address the resources required to be successful had to be achieved.”Rogers said the major consists of 12 core credits and 12 upper-level elective credits in addition to general business classes. New course offerings include “Digital and Social Media Marketing” and “Brand Management” to prepare graduates for work in an increasingly digital age in a field that values creativity and innovation. “The marketing major now also offers a host of newer or entirely new cutting edge and market-savvy courses,” Rogers said. “[Primarily] among our new classes is ‘Service Marketing’ which focuses on the strongest growing sector of the global economy. At the very leading edge of courses offered by any curriculum will be ‘Artificial Intelligence Marketing’ first being offered in spring 2021.”Additional perks of the new marketing major includes eligibility for membership in the College’s marketing honor society, Mu Kappa Tau. While the major officially goes into effect this fall, members of the class of 2021 can complete the marketing major provided they have stayed on track with their business courses. “Students are showing a great deal of interest in the marketing major,” Rogers said. “Many rising sophomores have asked to declare marketing as their major a full year in advance of formal major declarations. It is our expectation this enthusiasm will accelerate as a comprehensive description of the major is rolled out in full detail.” Rogers said the coordination and collaboration that have been expended to achieve this initiative will be rewarded by the knowledge that graduates will be better prepared to meet the demands of constantly evolving market conditions and be equipped with the skills necessary for success as business leaders of the future.“[The major] offers students the opportunity to add vital knowledge, skills and abilities to prepare them for the fastest growing and well-compensated careers in the marketing field while delivering truly avant-garde materials and subject matter for market changes on the horizon,” said Rogers. “The marketing major benefits everyone associated with it. Students will learn more and be better prepared.”With the addition of this new major, Rogers said employers will seek out Saint Mary’s as an even deeper source for recruiting marketing team members and the marketing faculty will focus more intently on keeping the major at the very forefront of their discipline. Tags: Marketing, new major offered, saint mary’s department of businesslast_img read more

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New service club at Saint Mary’s seeks to assist communities on campus, in South Bend during COVID-19

first_imgA core value of a Saint Mary’s education is justice through service and compassion towards others. This year, a group of Belles have chosen to live out this part of the College’s mission by creating Sisterhood of Service, a new club designed for those who want to participate in service opportunities.Saint Mary’s junior and president of the club Megan Anderson explained her motivation for creating the service organization.“I started the club over the summer with a group of girls from Saint Mary’s who I thought shared my interest in developing a club that focused on volunteer and service projects within South Bend and tri-campus communities,” she said in an email.Anderson described the objectives of the club, citing the group’s desire to help the surrounding community and empower students to positively use their talents.“[Sisterhood of Service] aims to provide assistance to the surrounding South Bend community while focusing on ways to serve the tri-campus community,” she said. “It was created to encourage women to use the skills and talents they were given to help others in creative and exciting ways.”Saint Mary’s senior and social media chair Molly Cutter said she welcomes any students who want to join the club to participate in service opportunities.“We wanted anyone at Saint Mary’s to have an opportunity to join us in serving the local community in our free time,” she said.Cutter said she hopes that members of Sisterhood of Service will be united by their common interest to serve others.“We are hoping to gain membership through exciting activities and volunteer opportunities,” she added. “We hope to provide underclassmen who may be seeking out opportunities to serve and gain fellowship [by being] a part of an exciting club.”Anderson and the club’s leadership board are planning a variety of on-campus events for students to participate in.“We are planning on having events with the Sisters of the Holy Cross, making tie blankets, creating health kits, hosting school supply drives and contacting outside organizations to see how we can provide assistance to them during this time,” Anderson said.Cutter said the club’s events will remain socially distanced for the time being due to COVID-19 restrictions.“We will have to start the year off serving while following social distancing guidelines,” Cutter said. “This means that we will be engaging in activities on campus such as providing members with tie blanket materials that they can bring back to their rooms and then send back to us to be delivered to a hospice center or a hospital.”Anderson said she is optimistic about the club’s impact in the community, despite the continuing pandemic.“Our plans have changed due to the coronavirus, but that will not prevent us from helping those in the community,” she said. “We are focusing on doing service projects that we can drop off at local organizations until the coronavirus restrictions are lifted. Once they are lifted, we look forward to venturing out into the community, partnering with organizations and creating personal relations with others.”Tags: Community Service, COVID-19, Saint Mary’s College, Sisterhood of Servicelast_img read more

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