News story: Derailment at Stonehaven, Aberdeenshire

first_imgAt about 17:03 hrs on Wednesday 10 October, the empty carriages that had formed a ScotRail service from Aberdeen to Stonehaven were being shunted from one line to the other over a crossover immediately south of Stonehaven station. The train was travelling at between 12 and 14 mph (19 – 22 km/h), when two of the three carriages became derailed on the crossover points, and the train stopped. The driver and guard, who were the only people on board the train, were unhurt. There was some damage to the track, and minor damage to the train.The RAIB sent two inspectors to the scene, to determine the cause of the derailment. The evidence which they collected shows that the points had been set, and the relevant signal had been cleared, for the train to move from one line to the other. After the cab of the train had passed it, the signal reverted to danger and the points moved under the train, causing two carriages to derail.The RAIB’s preliminary examination has eliminated the condition of the train itself, the way it was being driven, and the condition of the track and signalling infrastructure as possible factors in the cause of the accident. The crossover is only used by empty trains travelling at low speed and, in common with many similar crossovers that are only used for shunt moves, the points are not locked by the presence of the train. For this reason, and given that all other railway equipment appears to have operated as designed, the RAIB has concluded that the potential for safety learning is insufficient to justify further investigation. The RAIB will share evidence with the railway industry parties involved, to assist them with their own investigations into this accident.last_img read more

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Cloud Goes Mainstream in Brazil Financial Market

first_imgBrazil, the B in BRIC, is regularly in the media. An emerging economy going through deep social transformations, Brazil is facing serious infrastructure challenges. With millions rising from the lower to middle classes, urban mobility and transport are under discussion. Roads, ports, airports, communication, and energy management are also challenged. In the middle of this revolution, the finance industry organized CIAB, the largest financial and technology sector event in Latin America.The finance industry in Brazil has always been a leader in technology adoption. Brazil’s unified compensation system was among the first in the world to interconnect multiple banks in real time, under modern and innovative regulation. With this spirit still in mind, the theme of the show was very appropriate: New Challenges of the Financial Sector.New consumers, modern banking models, mobile payment, social interaction, and advanced security threats are all trends driving the need to change and achieve more efficiency with technology so it was no surprise that the biggest message at the event was the financial industry’s dependence on IT. Now, more than ever, financial services organizations need technology to succeed.EMC was a Diamond Sponsor at this year’s event, with former CIO Sanjay Mirchandani on stage discussing IT Transformation and IT Efficiency. EMC’s positioning on Cloud, Big Data, and Trusted IT was perfectly aligned to the event.While there, I had the opportunity to meet with customers and partners at EMC’s booth, speak with journalists who wanted to better understand EMC’s cloud solutions for the finance sector, and present on the Cloud Computing industry panel.The panel was very interesting. With representatives from IBM, Capgemini, and Brasilcap (a national credit operations company), we discussed the vision, roadmap, evolution, and state of IT around Cloud Computing in the finance industry.There are three important aspects that I would like to call out.First, we are on the verge of a new digital platform called “the third platform” as coined by IDC. The scale of users and new applications puts pressure on existing infrastructure, and the old ways just won’t work anymore. In order to remain relevant, IT organizations will need to be prepared to be elastic and flexible like never before.Second, Cloud transforms IT, and the early adopters are already taking advantage. Organizations need to accelerate Cloud adoption and stop asking “when” and start asking “how.”Lastly, the Software Defined Data Center will be the new way to deploy infrastructure that is elastic and flexible, and can meet efficiency demands through built-in automation and virtualization. EMC’s Converged Infrastructure Vblock offering with VCE and new Software Defined Storage platform, ViPR, demonstrate how we’re helping transform infrastructure management for the Cloud Data Center.These three messages were reinforced during the Q&A session that took place after the presentations. It was a great interactive discussion that called for specific industry examples. Fortunately, I came prepared with the NYSE Euronext Capital Markets Community Platform story.This example shows how a finance organization not only took advantage of its own IT efficiency for enabling the business, but also leveraged these new strengths to seize opportunities that were born from a new world of interconnected financial services.CIAB started many conversations on the linkages between the finance sector and IT, and I hope EMC can continue to make strides in helping these companies lead their own IT transformations.last_img read more

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Anfernee Simons shows Lakers he’s ready for NBA after unusual route to pre-draft workout

first_imgEL SEGUNDO — Anfernee Simons’ route to his pre-draft workout Tuesday with the Lakers was an unusual one.Then again, what was so different about it?Simons’ journey could become commonplace sooner rather than later, as more NBA hopefuls forgo the well-worn path from high school to college to the pros. Simons, an 18-year-old guard, skipped college in favor of a fifth year of high school before declaring for the June 21 draft.After attending Edgewater High in Orlando, Fla., Simons planned to play at the University of Louisville. But when Louisville became a target of an FBI investigation into corruption in college basketball, Simons decommitted and enrolled at IMG Academy in Bradenton, Fla. Lakers practice early hoping to answer all questions Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersSimons averaged 22.4 points, 6.7 rebounds and 3.1 assists in 2017-18 at IMG, a prep school and sports academy founded by renowned tennis coach Nick Bollettieri, who tutored and mentored Andre Agassi, Jim Courier, Mary Pierce and Monica Seles, among many others.Sign up for Home Turf and get 3 exclusive stories every SoCal sports fan must read, sent daily. Subscribe here.Simons’ athleticism and versatility caught the attention of scouts at the NBA Draft Combine last month in Chicago. Additional pre-draft workouts have taken him from Chicago to Phoenix to Portland and El Segundo in recent days, with more stops to come, including Utah, Orlando and New York.His goal during his workout with the Lakers was simple.“Me being so young, I just wanted to show them I could play with anybody,” he said.He didn’t believe skipping college puts him at a disadvantage. Trail Blazers beat Grizzlies in play-in, earn first-round series with the Lakers How athletes protesting the national anthem has evolved over 17 years “At IMG, it’s kind of like a college year, so I was able to get strong in the weight room, and I feel like that helped me, as well,” said Simons, who entered high school standing only 5-foot-9, but was measured at 6-4 during the draft combine.Asked about his IMG experience, he said, “Everybody plays a sport, so everybody has their goals, their aspirations. It’s more a business side to it. Everybody likes to have fun, but at the same time we know when it’s time to take care of business, it’s time to take care of business.”Simons acknowledged his decision to forgo college was a topic of conversation during interviews with NBA teams during his pre-draft workouts. Only a handful of players have skipped college before entering the draft, with some spending their one-and-done season in Europe instead.He hoped it wouldn’t be a factor in his selection, though.“I just tell them I’m confident I can make the jump,” said Simons, who worked out under the watchful eyes of Lakers executives Magic Johnson and Rob Pelinka. “When I go out there, I feel like I can do everything well. I want to show when I have a ball in my hands, I can do everything.“I can shoot, pass, rebound, play defense.”Simons also said he hoped he’s not the last NBA hopeful to skip college.“I think some will, depending on if they’re confident enough to do it,” he said of others possibly following his path. “I feel like a lot of kids are confident enough, but it takes certain players to do it. I feel like if they’re confident enough they can do it and go ahead and make the jump.”Simons was one of six players who worked out Tuesday for the Lakers, joining Khadeen Carrington of Seton Hall, Gyorgy Goloman of UCLA, William McDowell-White from Australia, Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk of Kansas and William Lee of Alabama-Birmingham.Related Articles Lakers, Clippers schedules set for first round of NBA playoffs Trail Blazers, Grizzlies advance to NBA play-in game; Suns, Spurs see playoff dreams dashed last_img read more

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Update on ARCCO Yield Issue

first_imgThe American Soybean Association (ASA) has worked with several other farm organizations to address discrepancies in county yields and payments under ARC-CO. These differences came to light last October, when payments were made for 2014 crops, the first year under the Agricultural Act of 2014 (AA-14), also known as the farm bill. The number of affected crops and counties may be more significant when payments are made for 2015 crops in October 2016. Continued discrepancies in yields and payments will make the ARC-CO program, in which 97 percent of soybean base acres are enrolled, subject to criticism as debate begins on the next farm bill in 2017.The cause of the discrepancies is the “cascade policy” for determining county yields adopted by FSA after AA-14 was enacted. Currently, FSA requires that a county’s NASS yield be used when at least 30 producer surveys are returned or when returned surveys represent at least 25 percent of a county’s harvested acreage for a crop. If neither of these conditions is met, the county’s RMA yield is used.  Differences between yields in neighboring counties can occur due to weather and agronomic reasons, and are often significant.  However, since reported RMA yields are frequently higher than NASS yields, payments to producers in counties where RMA yields are used can be substantially lower than payments in counties using NASS yields.There is no legislative requirement or guidance for the cascade policy, and FSA could change it if a way can be found that would make yields and payments more consistent between counties. One suggestion would be to use NASS yields in adjacent counties to establish yields in counties that don’t meet either of the requirements for a published NASS yield.  In situations where there are no adjacent counties, the FSA State Committee could use NASS yields in comparable counties. However, after several meetings with ASA and other farm organizations, FSA decided not to change their policy, stating that it could create “winners and losers” or increase the cost of the program. They also expressed concern that making a change in the middle of the current farm bill could bring unwanted attention to differences in yields that producers report to both NASS and RMA.ASA’s Voting Delegates adopted a policy resolution in February 2016 to support using RMA rather than NASS yields under the ARC-CO program. Since FSA has declined to change its current approach, ASA leaders decided at the just-completed July Board meeting to encourage farmers to submit NASS surveys in order to reduce the number of county yield discrepancies and make ARC-CO more defensible in advance of debate on the next farm bill. In addition, Senator Hoeven (R-ND) amended the FY-2017 Agriculture Appropriations bill to establish a pilot program for 2016 crops under which FSA would designate counties for which NASS yields in adjacent or comparable counties would be used to mitigate differences that would otherwise exist.  ASA will support adoption of the Hoeven amendment in Conference later this year if efforts to have FSA change its current policy are not successful.last_img read more

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