Paul McCartney Welcomes Bruce Springsteen & Steven Van Zandt For Double Performance In NYC

first_imgPaul McCartney will perform two nights at Barclays Center in Brooklyn this week.Setlist: Paul McCartney | Madison Square Garden | NYC | 9/16/17A Hard Day’s Night (The Beatles), Junior’s Farm (Wings), Can’t Buy Me Love (The Beatles), Jet (Wings), All My Loving (The Beatles), Let Me Roll It (Wings), I’ve Got A Feeling (The Beatles), My Valentine, Nineteen Hundred and Eighty-Five (Wings), Maybe I’m Amazed, I’ve Just Seen A Face, In Spite of All the Danger (The Quarrymen), You Won’t See Me (The Beatles), Love Me Do (The Beatles), And I Love Her (The Beatles), Blackbird (The Beatles), Here Today, Queenie Eye, New, Lady Madonna (The Beatles), FourFiveSeconds (Rihanna and Kanye West and Paul McCartney), Eleanor Rigby (The Beatles), I Wanna Be Your Man (The Beatles), Something (The Beatles), A Day In The Life (The Beatles)(Give Peace A Chance by Plastic Ono Band chorus singalong Tag), Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da (The Beatles), Band On The Run (Wings), Back in the USSR (The Beatles), Let It Be (The Beatles), Love and Let Die (Wings), Hey Jude (The Beatles)E: Yesterday (The Beatles), Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (The Beatles), Helter Skelter (The Beatles), I Saw Her Sanding There (The Beatles)(Reprise, Full Song)*, I Saw Her Standing There*, Golden Slumbers (The Beatles), Carry That Weight (The Beatles), The End (The Beatles)*w/ Bruce Springstein and Steven Van Zandt[photo courtesy of @TheGarden] Paul McCartney is officially on the road with his One on One tour, with two spectacular nights in New York City this weekend at Madison Square Garden. Friday night kicked off the NYC run with a 40-song setlist, 6 1/2 song encore, and special guest Bruce Springsteen. The setlist featured dozens of classics from the most beloved catalog in popular music, spanning Paul McCartney’s entire career – as a solo artist, member of Wings and of course The Beatles. Paul McCartney Finally Regains Beatles Rights After Near 50-Year-Long BattleDuring the encore, Bruce Springsteen emerged to the stage for a performance of “I Saw Her Standing There” that also featured guitarist of Bruce Springsteen’s E Street Band Steven Van Zandt. The rock-and-roll icons had so much fun together that they performed the same song for a second time. McCartney and Springsteen hadn’t played live together since Paul brought Bruce out back in 2012 at London’s Hyde Park, but the performance fell short when the promoter pulled the plug when it went past curfew–making Friday night’s NYC collaboration even more reason to celebrate.You can watch both performances of “I Saw Her Standing There” below, as taped by Jim Powers:last_img read more

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Cayuga Medical center reopens ‘Kids Care After-Hours’ with COVID-19 precautions

first_imgStaff say the move will be a win-win for the center as well as children who experience non-emergency injuries or illnesses after normal business hours. “It pulls those patients out of the ED so they can focus on more critical patients and our parents don’t have to spend all day or all night waiting in the emergency room to be seen,” said Nicole Allsopp, Director of Maternal & Child Health at Cayuga Medical Center. Parents will be required to pre-register and have to wait in their car until a doctor is available to see them. They stress that if your child’s illness or injury is an emergency or you feel the wait time is becoming too long, you should bring them to the nearest emergency room. center_img ITHACA (WBNG) — Cayuga Medical Center in Ithaca has announced that Monday they reopened ‘Kids Care After Hours’, their after hours pediatric care program. Kids Care hours are Monday through Friday, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Parents can pre-register by calling (607) 274-4356 or by clicking here.last_img read more

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Artists discuss role of holocaust testimonies in art

first_imgSeveral artists showed videos and  performed Tuesday at the Witness and Responsibility conference to explore artists’ responses to Holocaust testimonies and to create new, informative art.Testimony · Stephen Smith, director of the USC Shoah Institute, spoke about art and history at the Association of Jewish Theatres conference. – Emily Tat | Daily TrojanThe event, sponsored by the USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education, was part of the Association for Jewish Theatre’s four-day international conference, Reflecting and Shaping a Shifting World.Shony Braun, a Holocaust survivor, played a violin emphatically in a short video clip.He had previously played the song years before, when a Dachau officer threatened to kill him with a metal rod inches from his head if he did not play a song. He had never played this particular song, but he had pried a violin from the hands of a fallen prisoner and proceeded to play famous classical piece “The Blue Danube.”Braun’s powerful testimony is one of nearly 52,000 acquired and archived by the Shoah Foundation, according to Stephen Smith, director of USC Shoah.“These survivors have a very real, conscious sense of what their story could mean,” Smith said. “The question that lingers is that of history versus story: How do we become tellers?”Stacie Chaiken, an adjunct faculty member at the USC School of Theatre, said she spent months poring over USC Shoah’s 105,000 hours of written and video-taped testimonies from Holocaust survivors before writing her performance piece titled “Next Year in Jerusalem.”“We have the opportunity as artists to help shape perception,” Chaiken said. “We want to process this information and bring forth something that can shed light, can transform perception. Art’s role is to transform history into something that can change someone’s connection to that material.”Comedian Betsy Salkind said humor can play a pivotal role in conveying difficult themes. Though she is aware there is always the potential for upsetting portions of her crowd when she presents delicate material in a lighthearted manner, Salkind said that is one of the purposes of comedy.“I like the comedic approach,” Salkind said. “It allows [artists] to talk about things that must otherwise be really upsetting,” Salkind said. “A comedian’s role is to take problems and show [audiences] these faults.”There is often the misconception that Holocaust survivors have been silent about their experiences during World War II, Smith said.“People commonly believe that these survivors remained silent for 50 years,” Smith said. “But if you look at the mass of unpublished work of people who were told that the world ‘wasn’t interested in World War II,’ you realize these survivors weren’t silent. They were silenced.”Chaiken said the Shoah Foundation’s visual history archives and the Doheny Memorial Library’s and Von KleinSmid Center’s Library’s collections of written and visual Holocaust and genocide testimonies are important resources for students and artists.“[These genocides] are not something from the past because they continue to happen again and again. There are places still in danger,” said Chaiken.Kyungseo Min, a freshman majoring in theatre, said artists play an important role in portraying positive events in Jewish history.“Jewish history is marked by such negative things, and I really want to learn more about the brighter side through the theater aspect,” said Min.last_img read more

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